• Pot Roast Recipe

    At least once a week, I make some variation of this Pot Roast Recipe because it’s comforting, nourishing, and it freezes well.

    This Simple Pot Roast Recipe is slow-cooked so the meat ends up tender, and the root vegetables and bone broth make it even more nutritious. It's Paleo and gluten-free!

    There’s really nothing magic about this other than letting the ingredients cook slowly so the meat becomes so tender and the veggies are soft. In other words, you need a bit of time. (Now, I’m sure you can do this in an Instant Pot – and I admit to just grabbing one from Amazon while it was on sale – but I haven’t tested this in there quite yet. )

    My favorite method of cooking a Pot Roast Recipe like this is browning the outside in a Dutch oven, then braising the meat in broth with some veggies, and throwing the whole thing in the oven to bake low and slow.

    Of course, you can do this in a slow cooker, but I find this gives a better result. If you opt for the slow cooker, opt for low heat for about at least 5 to 6 hours. However, it may need more time if you think it’s too tough.

    I used sirloin tip roast which is usually less tough – though more expensive – than pot roast, a cut which typically comes from the chuck and is less tender. But, use what you have or what’s affordable for you.

    This Simple Pot Roast Recipe is slow-cooked so the meat ends up tender, and the root vegetables and bone broth make it even more nutritious. It's Paleo and gluten-free!

    I rustled up some of my favorite root veggies for this Pot Roast Recipe: fennel, carrot, rutabaga, and onion. You could also add potatoes, turnip, parsnip, or any others that you like.

    This Simple Pot Roast Recipe is slow-cooked so the meat ends up tender, and the root vegetables and bone broth make it even more nutritious. It's Paleo and gluten-free!

    I chopped the pieces pretty large because with 3 hours of cooking time, a dice would result in mushy bits that would’ve disintegrated.

    This Simple Pot Roast Recipe is slow-cooked so the meat ends up tender, and the root vegetables and bone broth make it even more nutritious. It's Paleo and gluten-free!

     
    And I got the idea to put whole parsley in while we were watching the new Michael Pollan documentary series, “Cooked.” (We watched it on Netflix.) Hat-tip to you, Mr. Pollan. I just fished out the parsley before serving.

    Simple Pot Roast Recipe

    Preparation 20 mins 2017-03-29T00:20:00+00:00
    Cook Time 3 hours 2017-03-29T03:00:00+00:00
    Serves Serves 6     adjust servings

    Ingredients

    • 1 tbsp ghee
    • 3 lb (1360 g) pot roast or sirloin tip roast
    • Sea salt & black pepper
    • 3 cups (710 mL) beef broth
    • 1/2 cup (118 mL) dry red wine, optional
    • 1 medium onion, chopped
    • 2 large carrots, chopped
    • 1 small rutabaga, chopped
    • 1 bulb fennel, chopped
    • 1/2 bunch parsley
    • 4 cloves garlic, peeled & left whole
    • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste

    Instructions

    1. Preheat the oven to 300ºF (149ºC).
    2. Place your Dutch oven over high heat and add the ghee. Heat until the pot is very hot and the ghee is shimmering. Pat the meat dry with paper towel and sprinkle the meat liberally with sea salt and pepper.
    3. Add the meat and brown for about 5-7 minutes per side. You want a nice crust to form.
    4. Remove the meat temporarily from the pot and pour in the broth and red wine. If you omit the wine, just use an extra ½ cup of broth. Scrape up any brown bits from the meat at the bottom of the pan.
    5. Add the meat back to the pot.
    6. Add the onion, carrots, rutabaga, and fennel under and around the meat. Nestle the parsley under the meat. Toss in the garlic cloves. If your fennel came with some fronds attached, you can lay those on top of the meat.
    7. Bake covered for about 3 hours.
    8. Discard the parsley. You can slice the meat or shred it into chunks. Serve the some of the broth.

    by

    This Simple Pot Roast Recipe is slow-cooked so the meat ends up tender, and the root vegetables and bone broth make it even more nutritious. It's Paleo and gluten-free!
    Simple Pot Roast Recipe
    Prep time:
    Cook time:
    Total time:
    Serves: Serves 6
    Ingredients
    • 1 tbsp ghee
    • 3 lb (1360 g) pot roast or sirloin tip roast
    • Sea salt & black pepper
    • 3 cups (710 mL) beef broth
    • 1/2 cup (118 mL) dry red wine, optional
    • 1 medium onion, chopped
    • 2 large carrots, chopped
    • 1 small rutabaga, chopped
    • 1 bulb fennel, chopped
    • 1/2 bunch parsley
    • 4 cloves garlic, peeled & left whole
    • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste
    Instructions
    1. Preheat the oven to 300ºF (149ºC).
    2. Place your Dutch oven over high heat and add the ghee. Heat until the pot is very hot and the ghee is shimmering. Pat the meat dry with paper towel and sprinkle the meat liberally with sea salt and pepper.
    3. Add the meat and brown for about 5-7 minutes per side. You want a nice crust to form.
    4. Remove the meat temporarily from the pot and pour in the broth and red wine. If you omit the wine, just use an extra 1/2 cup of broth. Scrape up any brown bits from the meat at the bottom of the pan.
    5. Add the meat back to the pot.
    6. Add the onion, carrots, rutabaga, and fennel under and around the meat. Nestle the parsley under the meat. Toss in the garlic cloves. If your fennel came with some fronds attached, you can lay those on top of the meat.
    7. Bake covered for about 3 hours.
    8. Discard the parsley. You can slice the meat or shred it into chunks. Serve the some of the broth.
    Notes
    The leftovers freeze well for up to 3 months.[br]If you opt for a slow cooker, I still recommend you brown the meat in a skillet – I like cast iron – so that a nice crust forms. Then, toss everything in the slow cooker. For more details about using a slow cooker instead of a Dutch oven, [url href=”http://blog.williams-sonoma.com/slow-cooker-vs-dutch-oven-a-conversion-guide/” target=”_blank”]click here.[/url][br][br]Equipment needed:[br][url href=”http://amzn.to/1cd6Lre” target=”_blank”]Knife[/url][br][url href=”http://amzn.to/17TDFez” target=”_blank”]Cutting Board[/url][br]Pot[br]Paper Towel

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    This Simple Pot Roast Recipe is slow-cooked so the meat ends up tender, and the root vegetables and bone broth make it even more nutritious. It's Paleo and gluten-free!

    Have a question about this Pot Roast Recipe? Leave it in the comments below.

    Steph Gaudreau is a certified holistic nutrition practitioner, weightlifting and mindset coach, and the author of the best-selling Performance Paleo Cookbook. Her recipes and expert advice have been featured in SELF, Outside Magazine, Elle, and Greatist. Steph loves barbells, cats, and anything Lord of the Rings. She lives in San Diego, CA.

    17 thoughts on “Pot Roast Recipe

    1. This was so delicious and flavorful! my picky kids devoured it. I pureed the juice with carrots and celery from the pot (didnt have the other veggies on hand) to make a gravy. So tasty.

      1. I’m not sure if anyone has, Cait. Similar parameters for a tough piece of meat, just be sure to allow the pressure to release naturally so the meat stays tender.

    2. I made this recipe last night in my slow cooker. I converted it per the article and let it cook for 5 hours. The meat was incredibly tough and chewey. I let it cook another 2 hours. Same result. By that time it was time to go to bed… I figured what the heck, and with nothing to lose, let it cook overnight for another 5 hours.

      When I woke up, it was done PERFECTLY. But that is a LONG way from the 3-4 hours promised in the recipe (more like 8-12 hours).

      1. Hey Andy…unfortunately sometimes what’s labeled as pot roast can vary in terms of the cut of meat. I used a sirloin roast and it fell apart, but that could be due to the amount of intramuscular fat, etc or the exact cut you used. 8 to 12 hours is a long time for beef so I’m wondering if there’s something up with your slow cooker (could be taking longer to come up to temp). Admittedly, meat is very tough to gauge recipe-wise sometimes because it can vary based on age, diet (grass- vs grain-fed), and what the exact cut is. And the description gives a range of 5-6 hours minimum, with perhaps more time needed 🙂 In any case, glad there was a happy ending! A

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