Author Archives: Steph

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com This recipe for Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast is easy enough to do on a weeknight, but special enough for a special holiday table.

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com

Traditionally, pork loin is stuffed with bread stuffing, but I’ve kept this Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast super flavorful with a mixture of dried tart cherries, sweet dried apricots, tender walnuts, and earthy sage. With a basic technique, you’ll butterfly the pork loin to flatten the meat and make it perfect for stuffing and rolling. Pounding the meat so it’s uniformly flat after you’ve cut it will make rolling the meat easier.

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com

Since pork loin is a very lean cut of meat, I recommend cooking it with the fat side up to help keep it moist. You could even serve it with a simple Paleo herb gravy (like this one from Nom Nom Paleo) for extra credit points. Remember to ask your butcher for some twine when you buy your roast—most will be happy to give you a small amount on the house.

When I got my four pound roast home, I discovered it was actually two smaller pieces tied together by the butcher (oops!). I just rolled with it and did two roasts that were smaller.

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com

Here’s how to make your Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast…

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: Serves 8
 
Ingredients
  • 4 lb (1814 g) pork loin roast
  • 1 c (100 g) chopped walnuts
  • ½ c (100 g) dried apricots*, chopped
  • ½ c (75 g) tart dried cherries*
  • 15 fresh sage leaves, roughly chopped
  • 2 tsp (14 g) fine sea salt
  • 1 tsp (5 g) ground black pepper
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 375F (191C). Line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper.
  2. Prepare the pork loin roast by butterflying or cutting it in a roll fashion. Here's how to cut it in a roll so the meat looks beautiful and spiraled when you cut into it. You may want to pound the meat so it's uniformly flat. Set it aside and prepare the filling.
  3. In a small bowl, mix the walnuts, dried apricots, dried cherries and sage.
  4. With the meat lying open, sprinkle about half the salt and pepper on the inside. Now, place the filling on the meat in one layer. You'll want to stay away from the edges so the filling won't fall out when you roll it.
  5. Starting with the thinnest end toward you, roll the meat up carefully. Place the rolled edge down and the fat up. Wrap butcher's twine around the roast every few inches so it doesn't open up during roasting.
  6. Roast the pork for approximately 40-50 minutes or until a thermometer inserted into the meat reads 145F (63C). Allow the roast to cool for about 10 minutes, then slice it into rounds with a sharp knife.
Notes
*Look for dried fruit that in unsweetened when possible.

 

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com

What’s your favorite meat for your holiday table? Tell me in the comments below!

Performance Paleo & Frugal Paleo Cookbook Tour

Performance Paleo & Frugal Paleo Cookbook Tour | stupideasypaleo.com

The Performance Paleo & Frugal Paleo Cookbook Tour is coming to a city near you starting this January, 2015!

Ciarra from Popular Paleo (author of The Frugal Paleo Cookbook) and myself (author of the soon-to-be-released The Performance Paleo Cookbook) are hitting the road together, and we’d love to see you!

Click each date for venue / time and to RSVP for free!

About Our Performance Paleo & Frugal Paleo Cookbook Tour

We’re making it all about you: we’re planning a mini-seminar with our best tips for using our books in real life; answering your questions; and leaving plenty of time to chat, sign your books and take some selfies. Because everyone loves selfies.

Details for first eight stops are set up, and we’re currently making plans for the Midwest and East Coast. (We’re holding out for slightly better weather, because last January when I traveled east for The Whole Athlete seminars with Dallas we ran into some gnar gnar conditions.)

If you don’t see your city on our TBD list, please let me know and if you can convince us there’s a strong Paleo community that we mustn’t miss out on, we’ll see if it works into our plans!

It’ll help us tremendously if you RSVP for each event…they’re totally free, but we’d like to give the venues a heads up for seat count. Both The Performance Paleo Cookbook and The Frugal Paleo Cookbook will be available for purchase at the event. Though you may bring books you’ve bought online or in other stores, it’s highly encouraged to purchase one at the store because it helps support our fantastic hosts.

Remember to RSVP now! See you there.

Performance Paleo & Frugal Paleo Cookbook Tour | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo or Whole30: Which Is Better?

Paleo or Whole30: Which is better?

It’s a question I get a lot. I’m answering it for you today so that you can go forward with confidence and select the best nutrition approach for yourself—especially if you’re planning to kick off the New Year with a renewed focus to eat better.

A Bit About Paleo First

Paleo is a way of eating focusing on real, whole, minimally processed foods. Foods that support gut health, hormonal balance, stable energy, and lean body mass. The stars of the show are meat, seafood, and eggs; veggies and fruit; and healthy fats. Most people start with a yes and no list of foods to eat and avoid, respectively.

Yes: Meat, seafood, and eggs; veggies and fruit; and healthy fats.

No: Grains, legumes, dairy, added sugars, processed foods, and salt. (There are others.)

Five years ago when I first started eating this way (on January 10, 2010 to be exact), the list of what was and wasn’t Paleo was pretty fixed across the board. It was easy to find a lot of consistency from book to book or website to website.

My, my…how things have changed.

Now it’s anyone’s guess, especially when every nutrient-poor baked good under the sun and processed / packaged food is now labeled with the “P” word because it’s “technically” Paleo. It’s kind of a mess, especially for newbies.

One site says white potatoes are okay. Another says to avoid them like the plague. One book says never, ever salt your food. The world replies back with, “But some salt makes food taste good.” Confusing, right?

While a yes / no list is a decent way to start your Paleo lifestyle and wrap your brain around it, it’s no way to live the rest of your life.

And, it’s not the smartest idea either. Why? Here’s an example.

Athletes need more carbohydrate than sedentary folks. By adhering to extremely low carbohydrate Paleo approaches and training extremely hard, many athletes have gotten into hot water with their cortisol levels, thyroid health, and poor performance (to name a few). Applying one Paleo protocol across the board where everyone eats the same exact thing—with disregard for life context, goals, health history, etc.—can have negative implications over time.

Another example. My husband’s been Paleo since 2007, but in the last couple years, he’s battled skin irritation like eczema around his eyes and elbows. Trial and error seemed to link it to certain foods like beef and eggs, but after much research, he narrowed it to a histamine intolerance. Eating a lot of fermented veggies, kombucha, leftover meat, bone broth and even certain vegetables—all foods widely lauded and encouraged in a Paleo diet—actually made his symptoms worse.

Long story short, you are an individual and context matters, which is why you need to learn about yourself and your relationship with food. That’s where Whole30 comes in.

Get Your Learn On With Whole30

[Note: I am an Envoy Extraordinaire for Whole30, which means I help educate the community and answer questions about the program.]

Whole30 is a month long elimination plan that’s been described more than once as “squeaky clean Paleo.” Dallas and Melissa Hartwig created this strategy to help people learn about their relationships with potentially problematic foods, then develop a plan for which foods to avoid long-term and which to reintroduce.

You see, we don’t all react to foods in the same ways. Me? I had a really tough time with sugar. Even after 18 months of Paleo eating, I couldn’t shake it. It consumed me. I wanted to stop eating sweets and craving junk food, but I was stuck. Even notoriously “healthy” foods like dried fruit were irresistible to me. I could slam back a whole bag of Trader Joe’s dried mango in about 10 minutes, then go back for more.

In 2011, I did my first Whole30 which required me to cut out all added sugar. (And, I avoided dried fruit because I knew it was a trigger food.) By the end, I had broken the cycle. Something I struggled with my WHOLE LIFE no longer had a grip on me.

Was I allergic to sugar? No. Do I have a sugar sensitivity? Maybe, but it depends on how you define that. Did I have a bad psychological relationship with it? Eff yeah, I did. What you learn about yourself during and after a Whole30 might surprise you.

So, completing a Whole30 will give you valuable, personalized feedback about which foods affect you positively / negatively, then allow you to make informed modifications to a Paleo approach for life. Sounds cool, right? You get to drive your boat based on how foods make you feel, not because of what some yes / no list you read five years ago told you to eat.

To Summarize…

Paleo or Whole30: Which is better? The answer is neither. They’re just different. They both serve their own purposes and have distinct goals.

The simple solution: Do a Whole30 at the start of your Paleo journey so you know how to better eat Paleo for life.

Paleo is a long-term nutrition and lifestyle strategy where nutrient-dense foods are encouraged, but inflammatory, nutrient-poor foods are avoided.

Whole30 is a short-term, very strict program designed to help you learn about which foods may be problematic for you. You can then apply what you learn to a slightly looser, less strict (but very much informed) Paleo approach to eating for life.

Whole30 Resources To Help You Plan for January 1

1: Get a copy of It Starts with Food. It’s really easy to read, and it’ll set clear guidelines for you. (Plus it has a ton of tasty recipes from Mel Joulwan of Well Fed and Well Fed 2.) No time or dinero to get one? You can read about the program on the Whole30 website here. Not sure if you should get the book? Check out my review here: 5 Reasons to Read It Starts with Food.

2: I’ve tagged every recipe from the blog that’s Whole30-friendly (over 100 to date) for easy searching in the Recipe Index. If it says W30, it’s made from Whole30-friendly ingredients. There are hundreds!

3: My Whole30 Pinterest board. Love to pin? You can find all my Whole30 recipe pins (plus other photos and videos) by clicking here: Stupid Easy Paleo Whole30 Pinterest Board.

4: My Whole30 video tips! You can find them on the Stupid Easy Paleo YouTube channel or by clicking the blog posts here: 5 Tips for a Successful Whole30 and 5 More Tips for a Successful Whole30.

5: Other awesome bloggers who’ve written about Whole30: Nom Nom Paleo and The Clothes Make the Girl just to name a couple rockstars! Click on their blog names for kickass Whole30 posts, including recipes. Mel’s got another newly updated post here: 30 Reasons to Whole30 with lots of good stuff AND her Week 1 Meal Plan with yummies like her famous Chocolate Chili and Sunshine Sauce!

6: My Stupid Easy Paleo Guide to Clean-Eating Challenges (It’s free!)

7: The Whole30 forum. A free forum dedicated to all topics Whole30-related. Click here to join.

Still got questions about Paleo or Whole30? Leave them in the comments below, and I’ll get back to you!

Paleo or Whole30: Which is Better? | stupideasypaleo.com

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak: Performance Paleo Cookbook

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak: Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak is the first recipe preview I’m sharing with you from my soon-to-be-released cookbook, The Performance Paleo Cookbook

With less than one month before it comes out on January 6, 2015, I’ve gotten the go-ahead to start posting a few exclusive recipes here on the site to get your taste buds working! I’m starting off with a bang with this uber-tasty and flavor party of a dish, Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak.

I am so, SO excited to be nearly to release day. You’ve supported me through the better part of a year on this cookbook journey, and I know you’ll love the food. Remember to pre-order for the best savings!

From The Performance Paleo Cookbook

Tender-Asian Marinated Flank Steak

Flank steak is a really special piece of meat and when prepared well, its melt-in-your-mouth tender. Because it can be somewhat tough, there are some tricks I use to make it more delicate, like marinating it for several hours to break down the tough fibers, cooking it at really high heat to sear it and lock in the juices and slicing it against the grain. Set it up to go the night before or in the morning before you leave for work, and all youll have to do is cook it when you get home! Serve it on top of a tossed green salad with some avocado for a nourishing, complete meal.

Serves 2

Ingredients for Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak from The Performance Paleo Cookbook

  • 1 lb (454 g) flank steak
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed
  • 1” (2.5 cm) piece ginger, peeled and sliced into thin coins
  • 3 green onions (2 oz [57 g]), white and light green parts, roughly chopped
  • ¼ cup (59 mL) coconut aminos
  • 2 tbsp (30 mL) lime juice
  • 2 tsp (10 mL) dark sesame oil
  • 1 tsp fish sauce
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) coconut oil

Directions for Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak from The Performance Paleo Cookbook

Combine all the ingredients except for the coconut oil in a plastic zip-top bag or a medium bowl. Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours. Longer is definitely better, up to 24 hours. Remove the meat and pat it dry. Discard the marinade.

Heat a skillet to medium-high heat and add the coconut oil. When it shimmers, add the steak, and sear for 3 minutes until a golden brown crust has formed. Flip the steak and sear the other side for 3 minutes. Then turn the heat down to medium-low and cook until it’s to your preference, about 4 more minutes for medium.

Let rest on a cutting board for at least 5 minutes before slicing. Cut into thin strips, against the grain (muscle fibers). It’ll be really tender that way.

Try This: Instead of pan-searing the steak, grill it.

TOTAL RECIPE MACRONUTRIENTS (IN GRAMS PER SERVING)

PROTEIN 45G

FAT 36G

TOTAL CARB 12G

NET CARB 11G

Pre-order now through through AmazonBarnes & NobleiTunesGoogle Play or IndieBound!

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak: Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Just In Time For the Holidays!

Just In Time For the Holidays | stupideasypaleo.com

Just in time for the holidays, our new batch of Stupid Easy Paleo goodies is here! If you’re looking for something fun for someone on your list—or you want to treat yourself—pick up something from the store!

Quantities and sizes are very limited, though, so if there’s something that piques your interest, I highly recommend ordering right away.

Everything is lovingly hand-packed and shipped by me, usually on the same day orders arrive (unless it’s a Sunday), so you’ll be sure to have your gift in hand before the holidays. Domestic shipping is free, and we even ship internationally, too. I’ve sent shirts to Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the UK just to name a few!

I don’t usually post apparel up as a blog post, but there were many people who said they missed the posts I made on social media back in October. I want to make sure that as many folks see it as possible!

Here are some of my favorites:

Metal Campfire Mugs

Stupid Easy Paleo Logo Enamelware Mug | stupideasypaleo.com

Trapzilla Sweatshirts (super-limited supplies)

Women's Trapzilla Sweatshirt | stupideasypaleo.com

Healthy Happy Harder to Kill Shirts (t-shirts and tanks…these are going fast!)

Women's HHHTK Tank Top | stupideasypaleo.com

Quadzilla Shirts (t-shirts and tanks)

Women's Quadzilla Tank Top | stupideasypaleo.com

Hangry Dish Towels

Hangry Flour Sack Towel | stupideasypaleo.com

And there are still a few Quadfather t-shirts left for the guys!

Men's Quadfather T-Shirt | stupideasypaleo.com

Every time an order comes in, it humbles me so much. I just sent a shirt to the Northwest Territories of Canada and one to Australia! I am so incredibly grateful for all the support you give me daily by reading the blog and chatting with me on social media. Without you, this site wouldn’t be here.

Much love,

Steph

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata is one of my favorite post-workout foods because it’s 1) packed with protein and 2) totally portable. In fact, it’s totally representative of the tasty post-workout bites in my upcoming cookbook, The Performance Paleo Cookbook! (It comes out in just a little over a month, and it’s still on pre-order for 25 off!)

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

My pal Jesse from Whitford Foundry came down to the house today to film a video teaser for the cookbook, and I needed to whip something up as my “prep at home, take to the gym” dish. This fit the bill perfectly.

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

Normally, I like to keep post-workout food pretty low in fat—which slows digestion—but eggs are a great tradeoff for busy folks. The lean chicken bumps up the protein content, and I added sweet potato for a good carb boost.

Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients for Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata

  • 9 large eggs, beaten
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) coconut oil or ghee
  • 1 large roasted sweet potato, cooled and roughly chopped*
  • 12 oz (340 g) lean ground chicken
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1 small head broccoli, stem removed, chopped small

Directions for Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F (177°C).
  2. In a large bowl, beat the eggs together with the smoked paprika, salt and pepper. Mix in the chopped sweet potato. Set aside.
  3. In a large cast iron skillet over medium-high heat, add the coconut oil. Then, sauté the chicken until it’s cooked through, about 4 minutes. Remove to a separate bowl.
  4. In the same skillet, add the onion and broccoli and sauté on medium heat until they are softened and slightly tender, about 6 to 8 minutes. Now, add the cooked chicken back to the pan.
  5. Pour the egg mixture into the skillet. Turn off the heat and stir the ingredients to combine.
  6. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until the eggs are set and not runny.
  7. Serve directly from the skillet or slice and store for leftovers.

*My weekly big food prep involves roasting half a dozen sweet potatoes. I line a baking sheet with foil, place the washed and unpeeled sweet potatoes on it, and get that into a 400°F (204°C) oven for about 45 minutes. I cool them, then store them in the fridge. When it’s time to use them, I just peel them! (The peels loosen right up after they cool.)

Remember to check out my cookbook! It comes out on January 6th!

Click here to pin this!

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Pumpkin Sweet Potato Custard Recipe—Dairy-Free & Egg-Free

Paleo Pumpkin Sweet Potato Custard—Dairy-Free & Egg-Free | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Pumpkin Sweet Potato Custard was the finishing touch to our Thanksgiving holiday meal, and it’s incredibly easy to make.

This was my husband’s first Thanksgiving in the US—he’s from Scotland—so I wanted to make a simple but delicious feast for us, including something a bit sweet for dessert. I don’t bake, though, so whatever I made had to be crustless and be mindful of his histamine intolerance; that meant avoiding eggs.

Paleo Pumpkin Sweet Potato Custard—Dairy-Free & Egg-Free | stupideasypaleo.com

So, while this isn’t a true custard which contains milk or a dairy-free milk substitute plus eggs, it’s the closest thing I could replicate. The texture is creamy and soft like a custard, plus it’s got a boost of gut-healing gelatin.

The rest of our meal included a brined and herbed ghee-slathered turkey, Beet and Brussels Sprout Salad, whipped sweet potatoes with sage browned ghee, cranberry orange walnut relish, and Nom Nom Paleo’s Easy Paleo Herb Gravy.

Paleo Pumpkin Sweet Potato Custard—Dairy-Free & Egg-Free | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Pumpkin Sweet Potato Custard—Dairy-Free & Egg-Free | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Pumpkin Sweet Potato Custard—Dairy-Free & Egg-Free | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Pumpkin Sweet Potato Custard—Dairy-Free & Egg-Free | stupideasypaleo.com

I served the Paleo Pumpkin Sweet Potato Custard with some coconut cream whipped with a pinch of cardamom.

Paleo Pumpkin Sweet Potato Custard—Dairy-Free & Egg-Free | stupideasypaleo.com

Serves 5.

Ingredients for Paleo Pumpkin Sweet Potato Custard

Directions for Paleo Pumpkin Sweet Potato Custard

  1. Gather five small jelly jars or ramekins, about 1/4 cup in capacity. You can make these as large or small as you’d like, so use what you have on hand.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk the pumpkin, sweet potato, honey (optional if you’re limiting sugar, though this recipe isn’t very sweet), cinnamon, vanilla, nutmeg, cloves, and ginger until they’re well combined. Set aside.
  3. In a small pot, heat the coconut milk on medium-high heat until it’s warmed through but not boiling. Turn off the heat. Slowly add the gelatin while whisking constantly. Make sure it’s dissolved and there are no lumps.
  4. Now, slowly whisk the coconut milk / gelatin into the pumpkin and sweet potato mixture until well combined. Pour the mixture into the jelly jars or ramekins.
  5. Refrigerate at least 2 hours or until firm. Store covered. Top with coconut whipped cream if you’re feeling sassy!

Change It Up

  • Use all pumpkin or all sweet potato instead of a mixture.
  • Use pumpkin pie spice instead of the individual spices. Start with 2 teaspoons then increase to your desired taste. Click here for my recipe for homemade.

Have a question? Leave it in the comments below.

Click here to pin this!

Paleo Pumpkin Sweet Potato Custard—Dairy-Free & Egg-Free | stupideasypaleo.com

How To Brine a Turkey or Chicken

How To Brine a Turkey or Chicken | stupideasypaleo.com

How to brine a turkey or chicken? I’m covering this simple method in today’s post and giving you my favorite go-to brine ingredients for succulent poultry every time.

I first started brining my chicken back when I got my hands on Mel Joulwan’s ahhhhmazing book Well Fed. Since then, I’ve created lots of different brines, mostly for lean chicken (think white meat) and pork. Letting the meat soak in brine, a salted water sometimes infused with herbs and spices, is sort of like a marinade.

How To Brine a Turkey or Chicken | stupideasypaleo.com

Instead of just imparting flavor though, the brine keeps the meat moist and juicy which is always a challenge with leaner cuts. How does it work? Basically the salt causes the muscle protein to soften and get less tough when cooked. More moisture is retained during the cooking process.

If a little brining time is good, more must be better…right? Actually no. Oversoaking the meat will eventually cause moisture to be drawn out of the meat. The following method works for any lean meat—chicken, turkey, and shellfish like shrimp are great—and you can scale up or down depending on the quantity of protein you’re dealing with.

How To Brine a Turkey or Chicken

  1. Prepare a container to hold the poultry. A stock pot will hold a smaller turkey while a very large bird will have to go in a clean, new bucket or other container lined with food-safe plastic.
  2. Remove any giblets and pat the bird dry with paper towel.
  3. Add the salt and spices to the container, then the appropriate amount of water. Stir well to dissolve the salt. (Recipe is below.)
  4. Carefully add the turkey or chicken to the brine. Place the container in the refrigerator for the correct amount of time. You can’t leave this on the counter.
  5. When the brining process is complete, remove the poultry and rinse off the excess salt and spices. Discard the brine. Pat the poultry dry with paper towels, then proceed with your preferred cooking method.

How To Brine a Turkey or Chicken | stupideasypaleo.com

Basic Brine Recipe for Turkey (for a 10-pound bird)

Follow the directions above, allowing the turkey to brine for about 10 to 12 hours. Tip: Mix your brine ingredients (except the water) in a Mason jar ahead of time and store for when you’re busy. Mark on the lid how much you’ve made…enough for a 5-pound or 10-pound bird, for example.

*For a 5-pound whole chicken, halve the quantities. Brine for 5 hours.

**For a 20-pound turkey, double the quantities. Brine for about 24 hours.

Have a question? Leave it in the comments below, and I’ll get back to you!

Click here to pin this!

How To Brine a Turkey or Chicken | stupideasypaleo.com

Learn Olympic Weightlifting with Diane Fu

Learn Olympic Weightlifting—Diane Fu | stupideasypaleo.com

This week only!

Strength training and building muscle mass is so important for all of us, not just high-level athletes, but what if you don’t have your own personal coach? Meet me at the bar(bell) because I have the perfect thing to help you get started with weightlifting.

Weight training has done incredible things for me: I’ve gotten stronger and leaner, improved my balance and coordination, and—most surprisingly—become so much more confident. Today, I’m introducing you to my friend Diane Fu.

I met Diane a few years ago at the CrossFit Mobility seminar, and it was clear that she was not only an incredibly amazing athlete, she’s also fantastic coach. Diane posts so many helpful tips regularly on her Instagram page, and she teamed up with Cody to create this video-based training program.

Diane’s one of the best Olympic-style weightlifting coaches in the country and this week, I’m sharing this awesome program that she put together. Click here for a free preview!

This bundle is a 4-phase video-based training program to teach you the foundations of Olympic style lifting and ramp you up to lift fast and strong. Whether you are a CrossFitter looking to polish up your form or an Olympic weightlifting enthusiast, this plan will take the unknown out of your training and give you all that you need to add strength, speed, coordination, and flexibility to your lifts and to your performance.

The folks at Cody are offering you a super sweet deal—36% off!—this week only! Now you can get coaching from one of the best out there. Click here to learn more!

Click here to pin this!

Learn Olympic Weightlifting—Diane Fu | stupideasypaleo.com Have a question about weightlifting or strength training? Leave it in the comments below!

Thanksgiving Leftovers Ideas

Thanksgiving Leftovers Ideas | stupideasypaleo.com

Thanksgiving leftovers: Love them or hate them, they seem to be an inevitability…unless your guests are much hungrier than you planned on!

You’ve gathered with family. Eaten enough to warrant loosening your zipper (or maybe you just wore sweatpants…you smarty, you). Watched plenty of football. But now you’re stuck with a fridge full of half-eatens. Here are a few ideas to inspire you to whip yesterday’s dinner into today’s goodies.

Thanksgiving Leftovers Idea #1: Use the turkey carcass / bones to make bone broth.

Bone broth—or stock as it’s sometimes called—is a really great way to use up your leftover turkey bits. Not only does it taste great, it’s also rich in gelatin / collagen which is great for gut health and maintaining your skin, joints and hair. Rad, right?

Now, to make a good-sized batch of bone broth, you’ll probably need more than one turkey carcass, but the leftover bird will get you most of the way to a full pot of stock. To ensure you have enough cartilaginous bones to get really jiggly broth, consider adding in extra chicken backs, feet or even beef knuckle bones.

For a fantastic tutorial on making your own perfect bone broth, click on this guest post from the broth guy Ryan at Bare Bones Broth.

Thanksgiving Leftovers Idea #2: Make a leftovers mashup.

Last year, I made a Paleo Thanksgiving Leftovers “Sandwich” with cranberry sauce, turkey, shaved Brussels sprouts and sweet potato “pancakes” as the “bread.” Needless to say, the idea (which I borrowed from Food52 and made Paleo) was a hit, even making it to BuzzFeed. Guess that means folks liked it!

Thanksgiving Leftovers Ideas | stupideasypaleo.com

Use this idea as a jumping off point for your own reinvention or click here to get the individual recipes for the Paleo Thanksgiving Leftovers “Sandwich” as I posted them last year.

Thanksgiving Leftovers Idea #3: Make a curry.

Probably the hardest part of Thanksgiving leftovers to deal with is the turkey: Unless you drown it in gravy, it just gets so dry. One of my solutions: Make a curry with it.

My recipe for Leftover Turkey Yellow Curry gives you the best of both worlds, combining the win of using up leftovers with the seemingly impossible feat of bringing dry turkey back to life. This mild yellow curry is great served over some cauliflower rice and really changes up the flavors from everyday to exotic.

I’m sure you have your favorite way to use up Thanksgiving leftovers, so be sure to share it in the comments below!

Click here to pin this!

Thanksgiving Leftovers Ideas | stupideasypaleo.com

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Cooking School

Steph’s note: This is the second installment in my recap of the Thai Culinary Adventure I took with Paleo Nick and 18 other fantastic friends. Read Part 1 here and Nick’s recap of our trip here.

When I last left you, our train from Bangkok to Chiang Mai was lumbering through the darkness of the Thai countryside. Daylight broke, and we were greeted with the sight of trees in every conceivable shade of green…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Cat checking out the local sights as we stop to hook up another engine…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Curious little dog…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Jesse without his face behind the camera for once…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Nick reciting his Thai numbers to this guy…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Another couple hours, and we arrived in Chiang Mai (about 48 hours after starting out on our trip). In case you’re wondering if the train option is right for you, here’s my honest opinion: If you don’t mind being mildly uncomfortable for 14 hours, the lack of fancy toilets, the potential for bugs, or want to save some money…go for it. If you want to get to Chiang Mai as fast as possible or want only the best accommodations, take a flight instead.

Welcome to Chiang Mai…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

We lugged our bags out of the train, stuffed ourselves into two vans and drove to our home for the next week, the Eco Resort just east of the Menam Ping river. It’s walking distance to the old city square and the markets. I definitely recommend it! We settled in and took advantage of the free day to get some food and amble around.

Eco Resort loves you…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Famished, some of us opted for lunch as soon as possible which turned out to be directly across the street from Eco Resort at a tiny, family-run restaurant called Inpoo Food Shop. We tucked into perfectly spiced red curry, silky Pad Thai, and other favorites while we recounted the long journey from Bangkok.

I heart this soda water…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

A soft-spoken Thai woman and her husband, Som and Payute, run the eatery and cook outside on three small propane stoves. They’re truly lovely with warm smiles and big hearts. We ate there several times over our trip, and Nick even arranged a special event there. (More on that in future installments.)

Som’s kitchen…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

That evening, we strolled the night bazaar and the following day was our visit to Chiang Mai Thai Cookery School. Chef Thanapon Punya picked us up and took our bunch to the Sam Yaek Market, where we got a lesson in Thai ingredients. Here are some of the sights from the market…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Scrubbing coconut meat before it gets shredded…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

All the rice…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Cutting rice noodles…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Fresh veggies…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Chef Thanapon quizzing us on Thai produce (we did okay)…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

More veg…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Stalls selling all manner of things…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

All the lemongrass…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Smiles from Nick and Noura…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Butchery…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Yes, that’s a fried grub. I ate two…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Cleaning fish…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

We were in Chiang Mai for the Yi Peng Lantern Festival. These are kathrong, offerings floated down the river during the festival. They’re made of banana trunks, palms, flowers, candles, incense and other decorations. We saw them all over the markets in Chiang Mai…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Fishies…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Weigh in…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

So many colors…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Cutting green papaya for Som Tam Thai (Green Papaya Salad)…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

…and cooking school…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Banana leaf cups for Khanom Kluay (Steamed Banana Cake) (gluten-free)…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Wok handles…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Prepping ingredients for Tom Kha Gai (Chicken Coconut Soup)…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Cooking Gaeng Phed Plaa (Red Curry with Fish)…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Plated red curry…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Chrisann helping make sticky rice…

 

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Phad Hed Ruam Khao Pod Orn (Mushrooms with Baby Corn)…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Prepping the banana cakes…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Cooking the soup…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Plated green papaya salad…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

The whole gang!

Thai Culinary Adventure—Chiang Mai Food & Markets | stupideasypaleo.com

Stay tuned for the next installment of our Thai Culinary Adventure!

Non-watermarked photos courtesy of Anderson York.

Questions? Leave them in the comments below!

Best Paleo Recipes of 2014: Are You Hungry?

Best Paleo Recipes of 2014 | stupideasypaleo.com

When I think back to early 2010, when I started eating Paleo, I remember how incredibly different things were. There were a handful of blogs—and it seemed even fewer books—available for inspiration. Fast forward five years and my, how it’s changed.

Now there are hundreds, maybe even thousands, of blogs aligned to Paleo or real food eating. Dozens of cookbooks offer up incredibly creative recipes. It’s totally great, but probably a bit overwhelming. How do you find the very best recipes amongst all the choice out there?

Best Paleo Recipes of 2014 | stupideasypaleo.com

My friends at Primal Palate have gathered together the Best Paleo Recipes of 2014 into one convenient resource just for you. Now you won’t have to comb through hundreds of sites to find the top, mount-watering Paleo recipes out there on the web. (To let you in on a little secret, the Best Paleo Recipes of 2014 ebook is on sale for 20% off until tomorrow—Monday, November 17 at noon! After that, the price goes up.)

Twenty-five top Paleo bloggers and authors (including me!) each contributed 6 recipes to this collaborative ebook for a total of 150 scrumptious dishes! What’s even better: Each contributor added one exclusive, never-before-seen recipe to the mix.

Best Paleo Recipes of 2014 | stupideasypaleo.com

You’ll find 150 recipes for every meal of the day that follow a Paleo template in this ebook. The photos are gorgeous and sure to inspire you to try new recipes.

Click here to see more of the great recipes in the Best Paleo Recipes of 2014 ebook!

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Best Paleo Recipes of 2014 | stupideasypaleo.com

Tuesday Night Chicken

Tuesday Night Chicken—The Frugal Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: This recipe comes to you courtesy of my personal friend and fellow Paleo blogger / author, Ciarra Hannah of Popular Paleo. Her new cookbook, The Frugal Paleo Cookbook—all about eating delicious, flavorful Paleo food without breaking the bank—comes out on December 2, 2014!

She’s giving you a sneak peek with this tasty recipe for Tuesday Night Chicken. If you’re down for saving money while eating Paleo, you need this book. Plus, if you pre-order before December 2, you’ll get a free bonus package chock full of awesome info and coupons. Take it away Ciarra!

Truthfully this could be named after any day of the week. It’s so approachable and affordable that you won’t hesitate to make it after a long day at work or just before payday hits. This recipe highlights my favorite way to cook a rich tomato sauce quickly: red chili flakes and cinnamon. It’s how my Italian grandmother fed our family, so naturally I consider it the right way, as any true Italian would. Enjoy using these straightforward ingredients to create a bold and flavorful classic Italian dinner…any night of the week.

Serves 2 to 4

Ingredients for Tuesday Night Chicken

  • 2 large skinless, boneless chicken breasts (about 1 pound [454 g])
  • 1 tsp (5 g) House Seasoning Blend (see below)
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup (150 g) diced white or yellow onion
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 batch Italian Seasoning Blend (see below)
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 (14.5 oz [411 g]) can fire-roasted tomatoes
  • Fresh basil and/or flat-leaf parsley for garnish

For the House Seasoning Blend

For the Italian Seasoning Blend

Directions for Tuesday Night Chicken

Prepare the chicken breasts first by filleting lengthwise to make 2 thick breasts into 4 thinner ones. Dust both sides with the House Seasoning Blend.

Heat a high-sided skillet over medium-high heat and add a little bit of olive oil to the pan—enough to just coat the bottom. When the oil is hot, lay the seasoned chicken breasts in to sear. Work in batches to avoid overcrowding the pan as overcrowding leads to steaming, not browning. When the chicken has been seared (note, not fully cooked) on both sides, transfer it to a plate and set aside.

Reduce the temperature to medium and replenish the pan with a little more olive oil if it looks dry. Add the onion, garlic, Italian Seasoning Blend, kosher salt and cinnamon and cook, stirring often. If you are not accustomed to building sauces this way, I know it may appear a bit strange, but trust me on this. Applying heat and oil to the dried herbs prior to immersing in liquid revives the oils and creates a deeper flavor. It’s the trick to crafting a rich tomato sauce in such a short amount of time.

Cook until the onion is translucent and the garlic and herbs fragrant. Pour in the fire-roasted tomatoes and mix together. When the sauce bubbles, add the par-cooked chicken back to the pan, nestle it into the spiced-tomato-goodness, cover and reduce the temperature to a simmer.

Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes while chopping the fresh garnishes—use either or both basil or flat-leaf parsley. This final simmer also allows plenty of time to whip up a quick vegetable side like an easy salad, sautéed dark leafy greens or Pan-Roasted Cauliflower & Zucchini, which is available on page 157 of the book or here on www.PopularPaleo.com.

I like to serve this directly from the pan after scattering with the vibrant green fresh herbs.

Love this recipe? Pre-order The Frugal Paleo Cookbook here!

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Have a question about this recipe? Leave it in the comments below, and we’ll get back to you!

Thai Culinary Adventure—Bangkok

Thai Culinary Adventure—Bangkok

A couple months ago, Nick Massie (better known as Paleo Nick) asked me if I wanted to go to Thailand on a culinary adventure. It didn’t take me long to jump at the chance to check another country off my travel bucket list. As type this, I’m lying on my fold out bed on the overnight train to Chiang Mai…my first chance to be horizontal in about 48 hours. It feels fantastic except my body’s trying to decipher which day it really is, but the jet lag sort of fades to the background as the food and sights and sounds of this trip fill my senses.

If you’ve ever seen The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, you’re quite aware—and probably fond—of the scene where the troop of twelve Dwarves tumble through the door at Bag End in pairs and trios. The early part of our journey has been quite the same. My trip started on Sunday night when I left San Diego along with two others from our group. After a quick flight to San Francisco, we were joined by four others, expanding our merry tribe to seven.

Thai Culinary Adventure—Bangkok

We tucked in for a very long flight (all told, 13-1/2 hours I think) to Taiwan, accompanied by some epic turbulence and binge-watching every tv show on the in-flight entertainment. Many hours later, we touched down in Taipei, picked up another member and boarded another flight to Bangkok. That’s a total of twelve, if you’ve been counting!

Once there, we greeted another three folks flying in from all over. Upon exiting customs, my hunger got the best of me so I pulled up to a little booth and snagged some fresh spring rolls and a box of pork sautéed with rice noodles and veggies for about 130 baht (roughly $4).

Now, I’m sure you’re probably wondering what / if / how I’m going to “keep it Paleo” when I’m in a country renowned the world over for it’s culinary delights. How will I know what they put in the sauce? What kind of oil do they cook with? Don’t I know that rice isn’t Paleo?!

My simple answer to this is that on a vacation that will come once in a lifetime—unless the universe has other plans—I’m going to enjoy the noms. Food is such a strong part of any culture, and to deny myself the chance to experience this beautiful country, I’m not staying strict Paleo when I’m here. I know there’s sugar in the sauces, it would be absurd for me to ask a street vendor about cooking oil, and that my body reacts fine to white rice because I’ve tested it. For more on my take on eating Paleo while traveling, click here.

Once we gathered everyone up, we stuffed ourselves into the train from the airport right into the heart of Bangkok and made a quick transfer until we were right out front of CrossFit BKK. Henrik and Nick arranged for us to do a Paleo seminar, so we tumbled in the door, set down our bags and started talking. There were some really great questions posed by the audience, and I really loved how we talked about adapting Paleo based on Thai culture and food availability.

Thai Culinary Adventure—Bangkok

Our answer: Just eat as much whole, unprocessed, nourishing food as possible. This isn’t a quick-fix diet. Instead, it’s a framework for choosing the best food you can a majority of the time for the rest of your life. After the seminar, CrossFit BKK was kind enough to offer our tribe the option to do a workout or to just shower for the first time in about 36 hours which I quickly took advantage of. Their facility is pretty rad with both an indoor and a much larger outdoor rooftop training area. If you’re ever in Bangkok, hit them up!

From there, the afternoon was wearing on so our now-expanded group of fourteen traipsed to the train station via another metro…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Bangkok   Thai Culinary Adventure—Bangkok   Thai Culinary Adventure—Bangkok

…and we happened to have enough time to snag some really tasty food from a couple street vendors…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Bangkok   Thai Culinary Adventure—Bangkok

…like skewered meat…

Thai Culinary Adventure—Bangkok

…and Pad Thai.

Thai Culinary Adventure—Bangkok   Thai Culinary Adventure—Bangkok   Thai Culinary Adventure—Bangkok

With our bellies full, it was finally time to board the overnight train to Chiang Mai. It looks circa 1960s but it’s clean and functional despite it’s age. It wasn’t long after we pulled away from the station that it was impossible to keep my eyes open…for about 6 hours.

Thai Culinary Adventure—Bangkok

True to form when I travel, I’m struggling to adapt to the time change. Appearances tell me everyone else is asleep right now as the shiny striped blue curtains are pulled across virtually every sleeping berth. It’s about 2 am, and we’re not quite halfway there.

As I gaze out the window, I can make out bits and pieces of what’s out there in the darkness: the moonlight glinting off the train tracks and silhouettes of palm trees going for what seems like eternity between towns. Kids sitting three to a motor scooter as they laugh and speed down a side street and people eating at a roadside cafe in the middle of the night. Gorgeous temples with intricate adornments. Roads that look like American freeways complete with green road signs with white lettering. If the writing wasn’t in Thai, I’d think it could be in Miami.

Every station we roll through has its own unique character. Phitsanulok was quite expansive with folks sleeping on hard wooden benches women setting up food stalls in the middle of this ebony dark night. Sila-At was deserted except for one man standing in the middle of the platform with his arms folded across his chest.

The train whistles sounds and fades into the black as we approach yet another town. It lumbers and lurches in what seems like a rhythm and lulls me back to sleep.

Stay tuned for more dispatches as we reach our final destination: Chiang Mai.

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash doubles as a hearty fall dinner or a great game day appetizer. It takes a little advance planning because the pork gets the low and slow treatment in the slow cooker, but the meat can be made a day ahead of time and reheated after the squash is roasted. Or, just make the meat itself! There are tons of options here. If you omit the honey, this recipe is Whole30-friendly and just as tasty.

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com

Delicata squash are cylindrical and generally smaller than a butternut. You’ll recognize them by their yellow skin with long green stripes. The skin is thin and edible, the flesh creamy and a bit sweet. You can even experiment with different types of squash if you can’t find delicata—acorn would work well—but instead of four, you’ll probably only need two. I slice the squash boats in halves or thirds for appetizer portions or keep them whole for dinner. Serve with a side salad or some roasted veggies for a complete meal.

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com

If you’re ever interested in checking out the pastured pork from 5280 Meat in Colorado, my readers get 10% off any order with the code SEPaleo.

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash
Prep time: 
Total time: 
 
Ingredients
  • 3 lb (1361 g) pork shoulder or pork butt
  • 2 tsp (10 g) fine sea salt
  • ¼ cup (60 mL) stone ground mustard, divided in half
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) raw honey (omit for Whole30)
  • ¼ tsp cayenne pepper
  • 4 small delicata squash, halved and seeded
  • 2 tbsp (15 mL) melted fat or oil of choice
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  • Chopped parsley, for garnish
Instructions
  1. You'll make this recipe in two parts. First, make the pulled pork because it needs 8 hours in the slow cooker. Overnight works really well.
  2. Place the pork shoulder in the slow cooker, then rub all over with the salt and half the mustard (about 2 tablespoons / 30 mL). Cover and cook on low for 8 hours. Remove the meat, place in a bowl and shred with two forks. (The cooking liquid can get quite salty which is why I don't shred it in the slow cooker itself.) Mix in the other half of the mustard, the honey and the cayenne pepper.
  3. About 45 minutes before you want to serve the food, get the squash roasting in the oven. This can be done ahead of time, too, and then everything can be reheated.
  4. Preheat the oven to 400F (204C). Line a baking sheet with parchment or foil. Arrange the squash halves on the sheet with the empty boat side facing up, and drizzle with the melted fat or oil. Sprinkle with some salt and pepper, then roast for about 30-40 minutes or until the squash is tender and starting to lightly brown.
Notes
If you're doing Whole30, check labels on the mustard and omit the honey.
Nutrition Information
Serving size: Serves 4 to 6

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Have a question? Leave it in the comments below.

Pomegranate Habanero Shredded Beef—Paleo & Whole30

Pomegranate Habanero Shredded Beef | stupideasypaleo.com

The flavors of fall always inspire me. Roasted root vegetables, soups and stews, and slow-cooked roasts are highlights, meant to warm you up on a cold day. Pomegranates are coming into season now, so I decided to make a beef roast with the juice—for a bit of sweetness—and balanced it out with some heat from the habanero pepper. (I get the juice with no added sugar.) Customize to how spicy you like it. If you want it hotter, leave in the seeds or use jalapeño pepper instead.

Pomegranate Habanero Shredded Beef | stupideasypaleo.com

I used my Dutch oven, but I’m sure you could make it in the slow cooker…I just haven’t tested it yet! Be sure to use a cut of beef roast with enough fat so it turns out tender and not dry. If you’re ever interested in checking out the grass-fed beef from 5280 Meat in Colorado, my readers get 10% off any order with the code SEPaleo.

Pomegranate Habanero Shredded Beef | stupideasypaleo.com

Pomegranate Jalapeño Shredded Beef—Paleo & Whole30
Prep time: 
Total time: 
Serves: Serves 4 to 6
 
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 325F (163C). Pat the roast VERY dry with paper towels and season with the salt. You want the meat to be very dry so that a nice crust will form when you sear it. Otherwise the surface will steam instead of brown.
  2. Heat a Dutch oven over medium-high heat, then add the ghee. (Ghee is great for searing meat because it has such a high smoke point.) Sear all sides for about 4 to 6 minutes each or until a golden brown crust forms.
  3. Turn off the heat, and add the habanero (or jalapeño), beef broth, and pomegranate juice. Put the lid on the Dutch oven and put the pot into the oven.
  4. Bake for about 3 hrs or until the meat is very tender. Shred with two forks. It's great served over roasted sweet potatoes. Bonus points for serving with a drizzle of pomegranate reduction. To make that, pour ½ cup pomegranate juice into a small pot. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer until the juice has reduced by about half and coats the back of a spoon. Just keep an eye on it because it can burn quite easily. If you're on Whole30 I would avoid the reduction because of sugar content.

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Pomegranate Habanero Shredded Beef | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question? Leave it in the comments below!