Category Archives: Seafood

Paleo Coconut Chili Lime Shrimp

DSC_0790 Crunchy paleo coconut shrimp made even more mouth-watering with lime and chili. Serve with lime wedges for another extra punch of flavor. Some heat from a dipping sauce like Chipotle Mayo would make it even better! Use any size shrimp you like.

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. raw shrimp
  • 1/2 cup shredded coconut
  • 1/4 cup coconut flour
  • Zest of 3 limes
  • 1.5 Tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • Coconut oil

Directions:

  1. Clean, shell and devein the shrimp (if needed). DSC_0782
  2. In a medium-sized bowl, combine the shredded coconut, coconut flour, lime zest and chili powder. DSC_0781
  3. Dip the shrimp in the beaten egg.
  4. Coat the shrimp well on all sides with the coconut mixture.  DSC_0784 DSC_0785
  5. In a skillet over medium-high heat, melt some coconut oil until very hot (but not smoking).  DSC_0786
  6. Fry the shrimp for 2-3 minutes on each side without overcrowding the pan. Remove to a plate lined with paper towels to absorb any excess moisture.
  7. Sprinkle the shrimp with a pinch of sea salt and eat while hot. Squeeze lime juice over the top for more lime flavor.

Ahi Tuna Salad

Ahi Tuna Salad Wraps Fresh tuna is sooooo tasty…I’ve you’ve never tried it, give it a whirl. It’ll make canned tuna pale in comparison. This recipe is based on one from the Barefoot Contessa, and is a perfect way to add some kick to your plate. Wasabi powder can be found in the Asian food section of the store, and can be REALLY potent, so I suggest adding just a little at a time and seeing if it’s too hot. Finding one without sugar or anything weird can be really tough…it took me a lot of searching to find one that was Paleo-friendly (“Hime” brand…horseradish, spirulina and turmeric are the only ingredients). Don’t like wasabi? You can totally leave it out.

I served this tuna salad on fresh romaine lettuce boats wrapped up into nori and served sushi style. If you don’t like tuna, you could substitute cooked chicken breast.

Prep time: 20 min     Cook time:  5 min     Makes: 2 servings

Ingredients for the dressing:

Ingredients for the salad:

  • 1 lb. ahi tuna steak
  • 2 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 avocado, diced
  • 1 Tablespoon sesame seeds
  • Romaine or butter lettuce leaves
  • Nori wraps, optional

Directions:

  1. To make the dressing, combine the lime juice, lime zest, coconut aminos, sesame oil, wasabi powder, salt and pepper in a medium bowl. Stir together and set aside.
  2. Pat the fish dry with a paper towel and season with salt and pepper. Grill or pan-fry on high heat for ~2 minutes per side. *Important: you want the fish to be rare inside. If you cook it until well-done it’ll be tough and dry. Allow to cool on a cutting board. Cut into chunks.  Ahi Tuna Salad Wraps Ahi Tuna Salad Wraps
  3. Add the avocado, green onion, sesame seeds and tuna to the bowl with the dressing. Fold the ingredients together to combine. Ahi Tuna Salad Wraps Ahi Tuna Salad Wraps
  4. Serve on lettuce boats / cups or wrap with nori. Or, just serve in a bowl with chopped lettuce. Ahi Tuna Salad Wraps Ahi Tuna Salad Wraps Ahi Tuna Salad Wraps

Paleo Fresh Spring Rolls

DSC_0830 The other day, I wanted fresh spring rolls. Badly. I also happened to be staring at the collard greens in the grocery store and this idea was born. I know you love quick and easy recipes, but I’ll be honest: this one is a bit more labor intensive because there is more cutting / chopping than usual and it depends which sauce(s) you make on the side. I could see these being an awesome weekend treat or something neat to bring to a summer party. All the components can also be prepped ahead of time and refrigerated for a day or two before use.

The really cool part is that the kelp noodles look just like the vermicelli that comes in fresh spring rolls, but if you can’t find them, you could surely leave them out. I served my rolls with Umami Mayo but I think they’d be killer with Melissa Joulwan’s Sunshine Sauce, my Paleo Sweet and Sour Sauce or my Paleo Sweet Chili Dipping Sauce on the side for dipping. Dipping rules.

Prep time: 45 min     Cook time:  10 min    Makes: 6 full rolls

Ingredients:

  • 1 large bunch of collard greens (you need one whole leaf per roll)
  • 6-7 medium-sized raw shrimp (about 1/4 pound)
  • 1 carrot, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 a cucumber, seeds removed and thinly sliced
  • 2 green onions, dark green tops removed and thinly sliced
  • 1 bunch of fresh mint, basil or cilantro leaves
  • 1 package kelp noodles (you’ll use about half), optional
  • 1/4 cup of Umami Mayo for dipping, optional

Directions:

  1. You’ll need to blanch the collard leaves so they become more pliable and lose some of their bitter flavor (this can be done ahead of time). Set up a large bowl with ice water. Bring a very large pot of water to boiling. Dip the WHOLE collard leaves in the boiling water for 1 minute. Immediately place them in the ice water to cool and stop the cooking process. Drain and set aside. DSC_0810
  2. Peel and devein the shrimp, if needed. Into a small skillet over medium heat, place the raw shrimp and 2-3 tablespoons of water. Cover and steam until the shrimp are pink, about 2 minutes. Set aside to cool. Slice in half from head to tail.
  3. Rinse and drain the kelp noodles. Set aside.
  4. Prepare the carrot, cucumber and green onion. How thinly you slice them depends on how much chewing you want to be involved. DSC_0808
  5. Now that the collard leaves are cool, remove the tough stem with a sharp knife by cutting upward toward the top of the leaf in an upside-down V shape. The leaves will roll better. DSC_0821
  6. Now assemble a wrap: Lay the collard leaf on a flat surface. Place two halves of shrimp at the top of the leaf. DSC_0813 Next, put a small amount of kelp noodles (a little less than a 1/4 cup worked for me). DSC_0814 On top of that put a few mint leaves, and two or three slices EACH of carrot, cucumber and green onion. DSC_0815 DSC_0816
  7. Now you’re ready to wrap, burrito-style. Gently but with a bit of pressure, roll from the shrimp end toward the stem end. DSC_0817 DSC_0818 Once you’ve rolled over once, fold in the sides and then finish rolling all way down. DSC_0819
  8. Repeat with the remaining ingredients.
  9. Slice each wrap in half and serve cold with your choice of dipping sauces, if desired. DSC_0832

 

 

Simple Shrimp Ceviche

DSC_0219Can I interest you in a meal that cooks itself?

Yes? I thought so!

It’s not too good to be true, it’s just ceviche – a dish of seafood that’s “cooked” using citrus juices and served up with ingredients like tomato, jalapeño and avocado. YUM. Last year, I posted a recipe for ceviche - along with one of the first videos I ever made…eeeek – and recently, I created a different one with shrimp that came out just as good (if not better).

Since I cook for just one person, I only used 1/2 lb. of shrimp but you can easily double the recipe or more. Plan the day (or morning) ahead so you can give the ceviche enough time to “cook”. If you don’t like shrimp, you can substitute scallops or firm white fish. Rumor has it that the juice from the marinade is a hangover cure though I haven’t tested that theory yet ;)

Prep time: 15-20 min     Cook time: 6+ hours    Makes: ~3 cups

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 lb. (~250 g) raw shrimp
  • 1 large tomato, diced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1/2 a jalapeño pepper, minced (optional)
  • 1/2 an avocado, cubed
  • Juice of 1 orange
  • Juice of 2 lemons
  • Juice of 2 limes
  • 1/4 cup cilantro, chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste

DSC_0217

Directions:

  1. Peel and devein the shrimp, if necessary. Chop the shrimp into small pieces.
  2. Prepare the veggies: dice the tomato, mince the garlic and jalapeño, and cube the avocado. If you want the ceviche to be spicier, you can leave the seeds in or add more jalapeño.
  3. Mix the shrimp, tomato, garlic, jalapeño and avocado in a bowl. Squeeze the citrus juice on top and combine. There should be enough liquid to cover the shrimp.
  4. Refrigerate for at least 6 hours or until the shrimp has turned from translucent to opaque.
  5. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper to taste and top with chopped cilantro.

Thai Coconut Soup (Tom Kha)

Thai Coconut Soup - Tom Kha | stupideasypaleo.comThai Coconut Soup is one of my favorite Asian dishes.

Usually I have recipe writer’s block. The harder I try to think of something to make, the more I can’t. It’s those times when I buy random ingredients and get home to my pantry and fridge that inspiration strikes. What the heck?! My local market had wild-caught shrimp on sale, which I couldn’t resist, and when I got home I suddenly thought: tom kha! This is a common Thai soup that is really easy to make but has so many layers of complex flavor. Wha-bam! That’s the flavor hitting your tongue.

The only problem is that I didn’t have lemongrass or Thai chili paste that most of the recipes I looked at called for, so I thought…I’m going to solutionize (yes, that’s a made up word) this scenario. I omitted the lemongrass but doubled the lime juice and used sriracha instead of red chili paste. In 5 minutes – plus the time it took me to peel and devein the shrimp – I had a hot, yummy bowl of tom kha in my hands! It might not be 100% authentic but it is 1) easy, 2) fast and 3) a damn good recreation.

Prep time: 5 min     Cook time: 10 min    Makes: ~4 cups

Ingredients for Thai Coconut Soup (Tom Kha):

  • 14 ounces (420 ml) can full-fat coconut milk
  • 2 cups (475 ml) chicken stock
  • 1 pound (500 grams) shrimp or chicken breast
  • 1 inch piece of ginger, peeled and sliced into rounds
  • 1 cup sliced mushrooms
  • 2 Tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 Tablespoon fish sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sriracha (or to make homemade, check this out)
  • Chopped cilantro for garnish

Directions for Thai Coconut Soup (Tom Kha):

  1. Prepare the shrimp by peeling and deveining if not already done prior to purchase. If using chicken, clean the chicken of any connective tissue and cut into small chunks.
  2. In a pot over medium heat, combine the coconut milk, chicken stock and ginger. Bring the liquid to a boil then reduce heat to a simmer.
  3. Add the shrimp or chicken, mushrooms, lime juice, fish sauce and sriracha. Simmer until the shrimp (less than 5 min) or the chicken (5-10 minutes) is cooked through.
  4. Top with fresh chopped cilantro for garnish.

Click to Pin!

Thai Coconut Soup - Tom Kha | stupideasypaleo.com

 

Mussels with Bacon in Lemon-Coconut Broth

Photo Mar 28, 6 47 28 PMWant a warm bowl of savory goodness? Make this. Want to impress a new boyfriend or girlfriend? Make this. Having a dinner party at your house? Make this for an appetizer. Holy cow, guys…it’s so tasty. I promise. This may very well be one of my favorite recipes I’ve ever made because it 1) is so easy that it hardly seems possible, 2) it packs a wallop of flavor and 3) you can substitute ingredients based on availability and it’ll be just as good.

You’ll notice I used pancetta (basically Italian ham that is bacon-like in flavor) but you could use regular bacon or even lardons – ooh, fancy French term alert – which is another form of pork belly. Bonus points for the fact that pancetta or lardons usually comes pre-chopped! The bottom line is to use something bacon-esque for a smoky depth of flavor. If you can’t find pre-cooked mussel or clam meat, you can use whole shellfish – just be sure to double the amount – and just steam them in the broth until they open (or try shrimp instead).

Prep time: 5 min     Cook time: 10 min    Makes: 2-3 appetizer servings

Ingredients:

  • 6 oz (180 g) pancetta
  • 8 oz (240 g) cooked mussels or clams
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced finely
  • 1.5 cup (350 mL) coconut milk
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • Handful of fresh flat-leaf parsley, chopped
  • Pepper to taste

 

Directions:

  1. In a large skillet over medium heat, render the pancetta until crispy.
  2. To the same skillet, add the mussels, garlic and coconut milk. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer 6-8 minutes or until the coconut milk begins to reduce down just a bit.
  3. Turn off the heat and add the lemon juice, parsley and pepper.
  4. Done. Eat. Receive compliments.

 

Shrimp with Garlic and Artichokes

IMG_3920I absolutely love shrimp. There. Confession. What I don’t love is cleaning all the icky shells off and taking the vein out, but it’s a small price to pay for these delicious little morsels. I usually look for wild-caught shrimp when it’s on sale and try to avoid farmed when I can, but that’s just personal preference. This would be pretty tasty served with roasted spaghetti squash!

Prep time: 10 min     Cook time: 5 min    Makes: 1 pound

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound (500 g) shrimp, any size, shelled and deveined
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup canned artichoke hearts, chopped
  • 1-2 Tbsp capers
  • Black pepper to taste
  • Coconut oil or fat of choice

Directions:

  1. Shell and devein the shrimp. Set aside.
  2. Mince the garlic and chop up the artichoke hearts.
  3. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat and add a spoonful of coconut oil or your fat of choice. Saute the shrimp until it begins to turn opaque.
  4. Add the garlic, artichokes and capers and continue cooking until the shrimp is cooked through.
  5. Season with pepper to taste.
  6. Eat!

Paleo Noodle Bowl

noodles After a brief hiatus – traveling back to the States and returning to reality – I’m back with a tasty new recipe. This meal was inspired by 1) Patton Oswalt’s stand up comedy routine on KFC’s “eating my lunch in a single bowl”  and 2) every noodle dish that you miss when you eat Paleo. Zucchini noodles form the base of the bowl…wait, what’s that? No julienne peeler? Try kelp noodles, use a spiralizer or test your patience at julienne by hand instead (or honestly, just make the veggie / shrimp combo and eat that because it’s TASTY).

Almond butter, coconut aminos and fish sauce combine to make the creamy, umami-powered sauce in this comfort dish. For my friends living abroad: I just spent 3 weeks in the UK and realize that ingredients like coconut aminos are harder to find than Nessie or a prancing unicorn. You could substitute something like gluten-free tamari instead. Also, if shrimp isn’t your thing, substitute any cooked protein. The quantities listed below made about 6 cups of veggies + shrimp and another 2-3 cups of zucchini noodles.

Ingredients:

  • 4 medium-sized zucchini
  • Sea salt
  • 1 lb (500 g) raw shrimp
  • 1/2 of a small green cabbage
  • 1/2 of a white onion
  • 1 carrot
  • 3 green onions
  • 4 oz. mushrooms (I used shiitake)
  • 1/2 cup snow peas, optional if you are strict Paleo…to me, they are almost entirely pod so I eat them
  • 1/4 cup smooth almond butter
  • 3 Tablespoons coconut aminos
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce
  • Coconut oil
  • Cilantro for garnish, optional

Directions:

1. Make the zucchini noodles by using a julienne peeler or spiralizer. Put noodles into a strainer and sprinkle generously with salt. Let the noodles sit for at least 20 minutes until they soften and water drains out. [Science nerd alert: you've created a hypertonic environment with the salt which pulls water out of the plant cells via osmosis.] Rinse the noodles well and squeeze gently to remove the excess moisture. Set aside.

2. Meanwhile, peel and devein the shrimp if needed.

3. Prep the veggies: slice all the veggies into pieces of roughly the same thickness.

4. In a large skillet over medium-high heat: add the coconut oil and when it’s hot, sauté all the veggies until softened but still a bit crisp, about 5 minutes.

5. Add the shrimp and cook until pink, about 2 minutes.

6. Add the almond butter, coconut aminos and fish sauce to the pan. Stir until the almond butter is well incorporated.

7. Plate the zucchini noodles on the bottom (I like them uncooked but you could heat them through) and the shrimp / veggies on top. Garnish with cilantro.

8. Delight in the fact that you’re eating your lunch from a single bowl. Yeah!

Jalapeño Crab Dip

IMG_3564

Holiday time means parties, and parties mean tables full of non-Paleo treats. Today a bunch of the gals from the gym got together for brunch, and I kept trying to think of something interesting to make. My mind kept gravitating toward a dip of some sort but how to make it Paleo would be the catch since most dips have some sort of dairy like sour cream or cheese. The mayo in this dip is homemade–egg, olive oil and a few other ingredients–which is the hardest part of making the whole dish. I followed the recipe in “It Starts with Food” by Dallas & Melissa Hartwig which is based on this one from The Clothes Make the Girl. I made the whole batch and used 1/2 cup for this recipe. To substitute for the Parmesan, I pulsed Brazil nuts into a cheese-like texture with garlic and salt. Instead of crumbs on top, I used almond meal that was toasted with ghee and salt on the stove top. The jalapeños are quite mild and give a nice tanginess.

Nothing like a captive audience to get feedback on a new recipe, and the girls all said they LOVED the dip. It was served warm with sliced mini bell peppers, but any crudite would work well. Now you have another dish up your sleeve for holiday parties (and nobody will even know it’s missing the gluten and dairy).

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup Brazil nuts + 1 clove garlic + pinch of salt
  • 16 oz (500 grams) high-quality canned crabmeat (I used Chicken of the SEa)
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup pickled jalapeño rings, chopped
  • 1/2 cup homemade mayo
  • 1 tsp hot sauce (read labels…mine has water, chilis, vinegar and salt)
  • 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce (Lea & Perrins is gluten free)
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/3 cup almond meal + 1 tbsp ghee or coconut oil + pinch of salt

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175C).

2. Make the Parmesan substitute: pulse the Brazil nuts, 1 clove of garlic and a pinch of salt in a food processor until fluffy, fine bits form.

3. In an oven-proof glass bowl or small casserole dish, combine the crab, chopped garlic, chopped jalapeño, mayo, hot sauce, Worcestershire sauce, salt, and Parmesan substitute. Stir until well combined.

4. Heat a small skillet over medium heat. Add 1 tbsp ghee or coconut oil, almond meal and a pinch of salt. Stir constantly until the almond meal turns golden brown and toasty. Be careful…resist the temptation to walk away because it will go from yummy and brown to burned in seconds.

5. Top the crab mixture with the almond meal crumbs. Bake for 30 minutes until bubbly and hot.

6. Dive in!

Shrimp and Greens

The idea for this recipe came from the back of a Trader Joe’s bag of mixed cooking greens…I modified it by cutting back on the amount of olives called for as well as the addition of the shrimp and sun dried tomatoes. This meal has everything I like: it’s fast, can be made in one pot, and has tons of flavor. You could easily double the recipe and have leftovers for a couple of days. If you don’t like shrimp, you could add in your meat of choice after the greens have cooked down.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 1 lb of chopped greens (kale, mustard greens, collards…mix and match or use what’s on hand)
  • 1/2 can of olives, chopped
  • 1 cup sundried tomatoes (I like them dried instead of packed in oil)
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth
  • 8 oz raw shrimp
  • Black pepper and salt to taste

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Directions:

1. Chop garlic and olives.

2. Heat a large skillet to medium heat. Add a spoonful of coconut oil and sauté the garlic for about 30 seconds.

3. Add the chopped olives, sun dried tomatoes and black pepper. Saute for a couple of minutes.

4. Add the chopped greens and chicken broth. Cover and reduce heat to medium-low, allowing the greens to soften and cook down, about 15 minutes. Add more broth if the pan starts to dry out.

5. After the greens are cooked, add raw shrimp on top, replace the cover and cook for about 5 more minutes until the shrimp is pink.

6. Serve with a drizzle of good quality extra virgin olive oil.

Breakfast of Titans

Do you have 5 minutes? Literally 5 minutes, including time to heat up the pan (okay…5:02)? Then you have enough time to cook up a nutritious dish instead of deferring to something processed or pre-made. Contained within is a solid dose of protein, healthy fats and some good carbs. Breakfast of Titans is one of the easiest things to make. Why Titans you ask? They were gods of unmatched strength, and plus Craig Zielinski of @bamfathletics named it so…and I’m not one to argue with that. If you don’t like smoked salmon, you could substitute in any leftover meat of choice. Another suggestion to make this breakfast even simpler is to roast a bunch of sweet potatoes (375 degrees for about 45 minutes) in the oven once or twice a week to always have them on hand.

Ingredients:

  • 4 oz wild smoked salmon
  • 3-4 eggs
  • Big handful of spinach
  • Coconut oil or fat of choice

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Directions:

1. Heat a medium-sized skillet on medium heat. Add a spoonful of coconut oil, butter, bacon fat, etc.

2. Add smoked salmon, break up into chunks and cook for about a minute.

3. Crack eggs directly into the pan and scramble.

4. When the eggs are almost completely cooked through, add spinach on top and stir around until wilted.

5. Serve with sweet potato on the side.

Shrimp in Coconut Broth

Man, I love the Twitters! So many interesting people with lots to share. In fact, my most recent follow is Gordon Ramsay (@GordonRamsay01)…I bloody love him, especially on Hell’s Kitchen where he curses and kicks people out of the kitchen! Today he posted a delish-looking recipe for “Mussels in an Aromatic Coconut Broth”, to which I immediately started salivating. I headed to the market to pick up my shellfish, took one look at the sad, mostly wide-open mussels and asked the fish guy when they were delivered. When he stared blankly at me, I became worried. He left to ask the boss, came back and said, “Tuesday.” Folks, it’s Friday here. Not to mention, when I pressed my face to the glass and looked at the tag buried deep among the shells it said, “Harvested 6/4″!!! It’s the 15th. In true Ramsay style, I wanted to tell the guy to piss off, but instead I bought shrimp and went to town on modifying the recipe.

This recipe varies in technique from the original and also substitutes a couple key ingredients. Since shrimp meat on its own is not super flavorful, I used the shells to infuse the broth with shrimpy goodness. Later, I strained the liquid and used that to create the base for the dish. When I plunked the bowl down in front of the Mister, he took a few bites, then launched into a very long story about his shrimp-eating past. The point of the story: he said it was the best shrimp he had ever tasted. Ever.

finished dish

Ingredients:

  • 2 lb. raw shrimp
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and cut in half
  • 3 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 1/4 c. dry white wine (or chicken broth if doing Whole30)
  • 1 can (16 oz.) full fat coconut milk
  • 1 lemongrass stalk, sliced down the middle
  • 1 red chili pepper (I used Thai), sliced
  • 3 green onions, sliced thinly
  • Sea salt and pepper
  • 1 Tbsp ghee
  • Cilantro, as garnish

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Directions:

1. Set aside a large skillet. Peel the shrimp of their shells and put the shells into the skillet (do not throw them out…yet). Save the peeled shrimp in a bowl for later use.

2. Add the can of coconut milk, white wine, thyme and garlic to the shrimp shells. Put the pan on medium heat and let it simmer for ~10 minutes until the shells turn pink and the broth is infused with flavor.

3. Strain the shells and herbs out by pouring the mixture through a strainer. Save the broth!!! Discard the shells.

4. Return the broth to the skillet. Add the shrimp, lemongrass, chili pepper, green onion and salt/pepper to taste. Cook over medium-high heat until the shrimp is pink and the broth has thickened just a bit.

5. Add the ghee (clarified butter) and stir so it melts into the broth. Be sure to remove the lemongrass prior to serving as it’s very tough…nobody wants to eat that!

6. Sprinkle with cilantro leaves and serve.

Ceviche

I’m not sure how authentic this ceviche is, and frankly all that matters to me is that it’s delicious and simple to make. With warmer weather coming up soon, this cool seafood-based dish is a nice addition to those spring-summer favorites that you may already keep on hand.

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