Category Archives: The Paleo Athlete

Performance Paleo Book Tour: Part 1 Recap

Performance Paleo Book Tour: Part 1 Recap | stupideasypaleo.com

The first leg of the Performance Paleo Cookbook book tour wrapped up on Sunday, and it was an amazing experience! (Another cool thing: The cookbook was ranked in the Top 100 Adult Non-Fiction books during its first week!

Ciarra from Popular Paleo—she wrote The Frugal Paleo Cookbook—and I hit the road on January 8 for the first half of our tour. In all eight cities, we chatted about our books and how to use them, and met the most wonderful people. It was really a whirlwind: We had only a day (or less!) in each city, so there wasn’t much time to sightsee, though we did hit up a couple key spots along the way.

We also left signed copies of Performance Paleo and Frugal Paleo in each store we visited, so if you weren’t able to make it out to the events, you still may be able to snag an autographed one if you act fast. (Check below for specific store links / locations.)

The best part of the book tour was meeting you. So much of this job requires sitting behind a computer screen and chatting to you over social media. And while that keeps us connected, it’s nothing like seeing your faces and hearing your stories. Stories about how Paleo has fueled your sport; helped you reverse your diabetes; restored your weight to healthy levels; and given you a new lease on life.

I walked away from each event newly inspired by you. Thank you.

We started with an enthusiastic crowd in Seattle at the Barnes & Noble—Northgate.

Performance Paleo Book Tour: Part 1 Recap | stupideasypaleo.com

We stopped next in Portland. Here, we got the star treatment with a fantastic Paleo dinner at Departure, and had a sold out, standing-room-only signing at the Cultured Caveman restaurant!

Performance Paleo Book Tour: Part 1 Recap | stupideasypaleo.com

Next it was on to San Francisco for a signing at Book Passage in the Ferry Building, along with friends like Fat Face Skincare, ZenbellyLiving Loving Paleo and Yes Design Shop stopping by.

Performance Paleo Book Tour: Part 1 Recap | stupideasypaleo.com

We rounded out our first weekend with a stop in Salt Lake City where we visited our friends Whole30 and signed books at the Barnes & Noble—Sugarhouse.

Performance Paleo Book Tour: Part 1 Recap | stupideasypaleo.com

Whew!

On a side note, we had amazing support from some of our favorite companies to keep us fueled up and happy during our journey. We had snacks from Barefoot Provisions, Epic Bar and RxBar; handy fish oil and vitamin D packets from PurePharma; skincare solutions from Fat Face Skincare and essential oils from doTERRA. These are all brands we love, trust and personally use, so check them out!

Performance Paleo Book Tour: Part 1 Recap | stupideasypaleo.com

I flew back to SoCal for a few days and Ciarra went back to the PacNW, then we regrouped in Texas for our second weekend.

We started in Dallas where we signed books at Barnes & Noble—Lincoln Park, then made our way to Austin.

Performance Paleo Book Tour: Part 1 Recap | stupideasypaleo.com

No trip to ATX would be complete without a visit to our absolute favorite coffee spot, Picnik! A huge crowd greeted us at Barnes & Noble—Arboretum, and we had a quick dinner at 24 Diner with Fed+Fit. Super good!

Performance Paleo Book Tour: Part 1 Recap | stupideasypaleo.com

The next day we flew to sunny Phoenix, where we got to meet everyone—including my girl Weed ‘Em & Reap—at the Barnes & Noble—Desert Ridge.

Performance Paleo Book Tour: Part 1 Recap | stupideasypaleo.com

From there we traveled to my home city, San Diego. We had another sold out crowd at Barnes & Noble—Mira Mesa, and I finally got to see Paleo CupboardClean Eating With a Dirty Mind and meet friends like Da-Le Ranch and Just Love Your Guts in person for the first time. We rounded it out with a really special dinner at Sausage & Meat, complete with their Bacon Fat Deviled Eggs!

Performance Paleo Book Tour: Part 1 Recap | stupideasypaleo.com

If we didn’t come to your city yet, don’t fret. I’ll be hitting up Orange County, CA on my own soon. Ciarra and I will be back out on the road this spring in the Midwest and on the East Coast. We’re letting the weather get a bit better so we don’t miss any flights or potential connections. Stay tuned for dates! I’ll be posting them here on the blog and updating my Facebook page and Instagram as soon as I know more.

I can’t say it enough: Thank you for supporting this cookbook! It really means so much to me.

With love,

Steph

Which cities are you hoping we visit next? Leave them in the comments below!

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Performance Paleo Book Tour: Part 1 Recap | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Mango Jalapeño Dressing Recipe

Paleo Mango Jalapeño Dressing Recipe | stupideasypaleo.com

I’m still rolling out teaser recipes from my new cookbook, The Performance Paleo Cookbook, and today it’s Paleo Mango Jalapeño Dressing.

I got quite the awesome surprise when I was told that my little cookbook was in the Top 100 of ALL non-fiction books last week. That’s so crazy! It wouldn’t be possible without your support. So to say thanks, here’s another recipe from the cookbook for you to enjoy. If you’ve enjoyed it, would you do me a huge favor and pop over to Amazon to leave a quick review? Even a sentence or two will be a big help!

If you’d like to see the others I’ve shared, click for Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak, Hasselback Sweet Potatoes with Herb Ghee, and Smoked Salmon Egg Bake.

From The Performance Paleo Cookbook

Sweet, tangy and a little bit spicy

This dressing was a happy coincidence. When I was developing my Crunchy Slaw With Chicken (page 158), I wanted to add some sweet and spice. Instead of adding chopped mango and jalapeño, I threw it all into the blender and came up with this dressing. It’s surprisingly creamy, and you can customize the heat level by keeping more or less of the jalapeño seeds. It’s perfect for dipping chicken into or as a topping for fish tacos.

Creamy Mango Jalapeño Dressing: Performance Paleo Cookbook
Prep time: 
Total time: 

Serves: Serves 4
 

Ingredients
  • 1 cup (92 g) mango, fresh or frozen
  • Zest of 1 lime
  • 6 tbsp (90 mL) lime juice
  • 2 tbsp (30 mL) light-tasting olive oil
  • 1 jalapeño pepper, stem removed
  • 1⁄2 tsp sea salt
  • 1⁄4 tsp fish sauce

Instructions
  1. Combine all the ingredients in a high-powered blender or food processor and blend until smooth.

Notes
If you add the entire jalapeño pepper—seeds and inner white membrane— the dressing will be medium to spicy.

TOTAL RECIPE MACRONUTRIENTS (IN GRAMS PER SERVING)

PROTEIN TRACE

FAT 7G

TOTAL CARB 10G

NET CARB 9G

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Paleo Mango Jalapeño Dressing Recipe | stupideasypaleo.com

What’s your favorite recipe from The Performance Paleo Cookbook so far?

Sore Muscles? Help is Here!

Sore muscles are pretty much a given if you’re athletic or training hard. I used to rely a lot on products like Tiger Balm (hello, people could smell me from a mile away!), but now I use essential oils for relieving minor aches and pains. As a weightlifter, it’s not unusual to be a bit sore after a workout, and the same was true when I was doing CrossFit or racing bikes.

Sore Muscles? Help is Here! | stupideasypaleo.com

Interested in learning more about how you can use essential oils for sore muscles? Keep reading!

Using Essential Oils for Sore Muscles

Knowing which essential oils work best and why is really important when it comes to caring for muscles. Peppermint, for example, not only gives a icy hot effect, it can increase circulation and oxygenation to the muscles. Peppermint has over twelve different active compounds, but it’s largest compound is menthol, which has been known to work as an analgesic as well as to increase circulation. (source) This is why peppermint works so well for muscle dysfunction including cramps, spasms, tension, or stiffness. Getting circulation in there fast can help relieve issues in the muscle tissue.

Synthetic menthol and other “peppermint” look-alikes will never be able to compete with real peppermint oil extracted directly from the plant with no other additives or synthetic materials. The twelve chemical constituents found in real peppermint oil work together in the body to fully metabolize. It’s the same as eating whole food. The nutrients, vitamins and minerals all work together to give your body what it needs. When in doubt, stick with what’s real.

Besides peppermint, there are quite a few other essential oils that can have a dramatic effect on muscles and joints. Thyme oil can “suppress the inflammatory COX-2 enzyme, in a manner similar to resveratrol, the chemical linked with the health benefits of red wine.” (source) Thyme is a fantastic anti-inflammatory.

Marjoram stems from the mint family, but happens to have a special combination of chemical constituents that helps with pain, especially in muscles. Historically, marjoram was used to combat spasms, sprains, stiff joints, bruises, and rheumatism. It was also used before bedtime for peaceful sleep.

This is just a small window into the essential oils that can have positive effects on the body.

Other Essential Oils for Soreness

Muscle Overuse, Tension, or General Aches and Pains: 

  • Marjoram
  • Deep Blue blend (contains wintergreen, camphor, peppermint, blue tansy, German chamomile, helichrysum and osmanthus)
  • AromaTouch blend (contains basil, grapefruit, cypress, marjoram, peppermint, and lavender)

Cartilage or Ligament Injury: 

  • Wintergreen
  • Marjoram
  • Lemongrass

Cramps / Spasms: 

  • Lemongrass
  • Peppermint
  • Cypress
  • Basil

Muscle Fatigue: 

  • Marjoram
  • White Fir

Stiffness or Lactic Acid Build-Up: 

  • Deep Blue blend

How To Apply Them

Many essential oils can be rubbed directly on the skin without dilution, but it’s recommended to first mix with a carrier oil like coconut or olive oil to avoid irritating the skin. Because essential oils are lipophilic in nature, they can mix well with a carrier oil and absorb fully into the skin. It’s always best to use only 1 to 3 drops per use of essential oil. The standard carrier oil to essential oil ratio is about 1 to 3 drops of an essential oil to 1 teaspoon of carrier oil.

For a short time, I’m giving away free samples of Deep Blue blend. Click here to find out more!

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Sore Muscles? Help is Here! | stupideasypaleo.com

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes with Herb Ghee Recipe

 

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes with Compound Herb Ghee Recipe | stupideasypaleo.com

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes with Compound Herb Ghee is another tasty recipe preview I’m sharing from newly released cookbook, The Performance Paleo Cookbook

The cookbook came out last week and already I’m seeing so many of your pictures on Instagram and around social media. It’s an absolute thrill to have so much fantastic support, and I’m really glad you’re loving the recipes!

Right now, I’m on book tour with Ciarra Hannah of Popular Paleo. We’re speaking in Salt Lake City today and next weekend we’ll be in Dallas, Austin, Phoenix and San Diego. Come out and see us!

This recipe may sound fancy of complicated, but it’s totally not. There are six ingredients (not counting the sea salt), and it can be roasting in the oven on your weekly cook up day or while you’re getting the rest of dinner prepared.

From The Performance Paleo Cookbook

Deliciously roasted sweet potatoes with a dollop of healthy fat

Hasselback potatoes originated in Sweden, and they make basic roasted spuds special. When roasted in the oven, the fan-shaped cuts get crispy and delicious. Top these sweet potatoes with a compound butter of ghee and fresh herbs for a sophisticated finish.

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes with Compound Herb Ghee: Performance Paleo Cookbook
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

Serves: Serves 2 to 4
 

Ingredients
  • 1 lb (454 g) white sweet potatoes
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) melted ghee
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 2 tbsp (30 g) ghee
  • 1 small clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp fresh chopped rosemary, about 1 sprig
  • 1 tsp fresh thyme, about 5 sprigs

Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F/204°C and line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper. Scrub the skin of the sweet potatoes thoroughly. Use a very sharp knife to make several vertical cuts from the top of the sweet potatoes most of the way through, stopping about ¼ inch/6 millimeters from the bottom. Place the sweet potatoes on the baking sheet. Brush with the melted ghee and sprinkle the sea salt on top. Roast for 60 to 75 minutes, until the sweet potatoes are soft.
  2. Meanwhile, make the compound ghee. In a small bowl, combine the ghee, garlic, rosemary and thyme. Stir well with a spoon until it forms a soft mixture. Top the hot roasted sweet potatoes with the compound ghee.

Notes
Try white potatoes instead of sweet potatoes if you desire. In this recipe, I make an exception about not eating the skin because it’s so crispy.

TOTAL RECIPE MACRONUTRIENTS (IN GRAMS PER SERVING)

PROTEIN 2G

FAT 10G

TOTAL CARB 21G

NET CARB 19G

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Hasselback Sweet Potatoes with Compound Herb Ghee Recipe | stupideasypaleo.com

 

Do you love sweet potatoes? Have you tried Hasselback potatoes yet?

The Performance Paleo Cookbook is Here! Plus Two New Resources!

The Performance Paleo Cookbook is here!

After so many months of writing, cooking, photographing, editing and waiting, I can proudly say the day has finally arrived. The book I’ve poured my heart into is now in stores and making its way out into the world. Countless folks have posted up pictures of the cookbook in their hands today, and it’s been absolutely surreal.

It’s so hard to sum up what this day has meant to me. You’ve encouraged me and waited patiently as I blogged less to write more in the middle part of 2014. You’ve given me feedback and answered the questions that helped me craft a book that would be a better resource for you. It’s because of you that there even is a Performance Paleo Cookbook. My heart is so full.

In short, thank you.

To show my gratitude, I’ve developed two free printable PDF lists to go along with The Performance Paleo Cookbook. One lists Whole30-friendly recipes and the other AIP-friendly recipes. I know how important it is to have flexibility with food options if you’re on a modified nutrition plan.

Click the images below—or their respective links—to view, download and save these guides for free. Print them out for handy reference!

Whole30 Recipes in The Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Click here to download the Whole30 list.

AIP Recipes in The Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Click here to download the AIP list.

And if you haven’t ordered your copy of The Performance Paleo Cookbook yet, I’d love to show you more of the features, so head on over here for that.

If you have purchased a copy, I’d be so grateful if you would take a couple minutes and leave a review on Amazon. It helps folks decide whether the book is right for them!

Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins Recipe

Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins are a great pre-workout snack or quick breakfast! They’re loaded with veggies, and they’re gluten- and dairy-free. If you’re doing a Whole30, they’re 100% Whole30-friendly.

Breakfast can be the toughest meal of the day to get organized with, and my go-to tip for quick morning eats is to steam a dozen eggs on your weekly cook-up day. But sometimes, I get tired of just plain eggs, and these little Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins are the perfect solution.

Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins | stupideasypaleo.com

I started making egg muffins a couple years ago, and they can be done in a multitude of ways: Add meat and switch up the veggies and spices! You’ll be amazed how many interesting combinations you can come up with. These particular Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins would be great with some browned sausage mixed in, too.

If you don’t have Flavor God Pizza Seasoning—which I realize is quite possible—just substitute it for the spices listed in the Notes section of the recipe. Have fun with it! Even the cat thought they smelled good.

Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins | stupideasypaleo.com

4.8 from 5 reviews

Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

Serves: Makes 12
 

Ingredients
  • 8 oz sliced mushrooms
  • 2 tsp coconut oil
  • 1 cup chopped cooked broccoli
  • ¼ cup sliced black olives
  • 8 large eggs
  • 2 tbsp coconut milk
  • 1 tbsp Flavor God Pizza Seasoning*
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • ¼ tsp black pepper

Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350F. Line a 12-cup muffin tray with liners and grease them. I use silicone liners like these and grease them lightly with coconut oil. Set aside.
  2. In a medium skillet over medium-high heat, melt the coconut oil. Add the mushrooms, cooking and stirring until the moisture is drawn out and the mushrooms begin to brown slightly, about 8 minutes. Turn off the heat and add the broccoli and black olives. Stir to combine.
  3. In a large bowl, beat the eggs with the coconut milk, pizza seasoning, salt and pepper.
  4. Spoon the veggie mixture evenly into the muffin liners. They should be about ⅔ full. Now, pour the egg mixture evenly into the muffin liners until it’s about ¾ full.
  5. Bake the egg muffins for 20 to 25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the middle comes out cleanly.

Notes
*If you don’t have Flavor God Pizza Seasoning, use 1 tsp garlic powder + ¼ tsp dried basil + ¼ tsp dried oregano.

 

Are you doing a Whole30 this January? Let me know in the comments below!

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Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins | stupideasypaleo.com

Looking for more pre-workout recipe ideas?

Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

 

Smoked Salmon Egg Bake Recipe

Smoked Salmon Egg Bake from Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

I’m so excited to share this recipe for Smoked Salmon Egg Bake with you. It’s another sneak peek from The Performance Paleo Cookbook which releases to the world in just a bit over a week!

I know how important previews can be, especially when there are so many new books are coming out. You want to pick the one that’s right for you. That’s why I’ll be sharing five recipes from Performance Paleo Cookbook so you can try before you buy! With the New Year coming soon, I’m confident this is the best cookbook out there to support your commitment to exercise / training…because we all know you can’t out-train a poor diet.

Without further adieu,…

From The Performance Paleo Cookbook

Smoked Salmon Egg Bake

Portable pre-workout protein with a smoked salmon twist

With their protein and healthy fat profile, eggs make a fantastic pre-workout food. They’re rich in essential nutrients like vitamin D, choline and folate and are a relatively inexpensive way to incorporate more protein into your diet. In this recipe, I bumped up the veggie content with the zucchini and green onions. Cut into squares, and take them with you on the go!

5.0 from 1 reviews

Smoked Salmon Egg Bake: Performance Paleo Cookbook
Serves: Serves 6
 

Ingredients
  • 1 tsp + 1 tbsp (15 mL) coconut oil
  • 1 lb (454 g) zucchini, shredded
  • 3 green onions (2 oz [57 g]), white and light green parts, thinly sliced
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • 8 large eggs, beaten
  • 1 tsp dried dill
  • 4 oz (113 g) smoked salmon, chopped

Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F/177°C and grease an 8-inch x 8-inch/20-centimeter x 20-centimeter baking dish with 1 teaspoon coconut oil.
  2. Now sweat the zucchini and green onions. Heat a large skillet over medium heat, then add 1 tablespoon/15 milliliters coconut oil. Add the zucchini, green onions, salt and pepper. Cook and stir until the veggies are wilted and lightly browned. You want most of the moisture to cook off , about 6 to 8 minutes. Let the mixture cool.
  3. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, beat the eggs together with the dill, then mix in the smoked salmon. When the zucchini and green onions are cool, add them to the eggs and stir until everything is well combined. Pour the mixture into the baking dish. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until the center is set and not liquid.

Notes
TOTAL RECIPE MACRONUTRIENTS (IN GRAMS PER SERVING)

PROTEIN 13G

FAT 11G

TOTAL CARB 3G

NET CARB 2G

Pre-order now through through AmazonBarnes & NobleiTunesGoogle Play or IndieBound!

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Smoked Salmon Egg Bake from Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Performance Paleo & Frugal Paleo Cookbook Tour

Performance Paleo & Frugal Paleo Cookbook Tour | stupideasypaleo.com

The Performance Paleo & Frugal Paleo Cookbook Tour is coming to a city near you starting this January, 2015!

Ciarra from Popular Paleo (author of The Frugal Paleo Cookbook) and myself (author of the soon-to-be-released The Performance Paleo Cookbook) are hitting the road together, and we’d love to see you!

Click each date for venue / time and to RSVP for free!

About Our Performance Paleo & Frugal Paleo Cookbook Tour

We’re making it all about you: we’re planning a mini-seminar with our best tips for using our books in real life; answering your questions; and leaving plenty of time to chat, sign your books and take some selfies. Because everyone loves selfies.

Details for first eight stops are set up, and we’re currently making plans for the Midwest and East Coast. (We’re holding out for slightly better weather, because last January when I traveled east for The Whole Athlete seminars with Dallas we ran into some gnar gnar conditions.)

If you don’t see your city on our TBD list, please let me know and if you can convince us there’s a strong Paleo community that we mustn’t miss out on, we’ll see if it works into our plans!

It’ll help us tremendously if you RSVP for each event…they’re totally free, but we’d like to give the venues a heads up for seat count. Both The Performance Paleo Cookbook and The Frugal Paleo Cookbook will be available for purchase at the event. Though you may bring books you’ve bought online or in other stores, it’s highly encouraged to purchase one at the store because it helps support our fantastic hosts.

Remember to RSVP now! See you there.

Performance Paleo & Frugal Paleo Cookbook Tour | stupideasypaleo.com

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak: Performance Paleo Cookbook

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak: Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak is the first recipe preview I’m sharing with you from my soon-to-be-released cookbook, The Performance Paleo Cookbook

With less than one month before it comes out on January 6, 2015, I’ve gotten the go-ahead to start posting a few exclusive recipes here on the site to get your taste buds working! I’m starting off with a bang with this uber-tasty and flavor party of a dish, Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak.

I am so, SO excited to be nearly to release day. You’ve supported me through the better part of a year on this cookbook journey, and I know you’ll love the food. Remember to pre-order for the best savings!

From The Performance Paleo Cookbook

Tender-Asian Marinated Flank Steak

Flank steak is a really special piece of meat and when prepared well, its melt-in-your-mouth tender. Because it can be somewhat tough, there are some tricks I use to make it more delicate, like marinating it for several hours to break down the tough fibers, cooking it at really high heat to sear it and lock in the juices and slicing it against the grain. Set it up to go the night before or in the morning before you leave for work, and all youll have to do is cook it when you get home! Serve it on top of a tossed green salad with some avocado for a nourishing, complete meal.

Serves 2

Ingredients for Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak from The Performance Paleo Cookbook

  • 1 lb (454 g) flank steak
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed
  • 1” (2.5 cm) piece ginger, peeled and sliced into thin coins
  • 3 green onions (2 oz [57 g]), white and light green parts, roughly chopped
  • ¼ cup (59 mL) coconut aminos
  • 2 tbsp (30 mL) lime juice
  • 2 tsp (10 mL) dark sesame oil
  • 1 tsp fish sauce
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) coconut oil

Directions for Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak from The Performance Paleo Cookbook

Combine all the ingredients except for the coconut oil in a plastic zip-top bag or a medium bowl. Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours. Longer is definitely better, up to 24 hours. Remove the meat and pat it dry. Discard the marinade.

Heat a skillet to medium-high heat and add the coconut oil. When it shimmers, add the steak, and sear for 3 minutes until a golden brown crust has formed. Flip the steak and sear the other side for 3 minutes. Then turn the heat down to medium-low and cook until it’s to your preference, about 4 more minutes for medium.

Let rest on a cutting board for at least 5 minutes before slicing. Cut into thin strips, against the grain (muscle fibers). It’ll be really tender that way.

Try This: Instead of pan-searing the steak, grill it.

TOTAL RECIPE MACRONUTRIENTS (IN GRAMS PER SERVING)

PROTEIN 45G

FAT 36G

TOTAL CARB 12G

NET CARB 11G

Pre-order now through through AmazonBarnes & NobleiTunesGoogle Play or IndieBound!

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak: Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata Recipe

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata is one of my favorite post-workout foods because it’s 1) packed with protein and 2) totally portable. In fact, it’s totally representative of the tasty post-workout bites in my upcoming cookbook, The Performance Paleo Cookbook! (It comes out in just a little over a month, and it’s still on pre-order for 25 off!)

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

My pal Jesse from Whitford Foundry came down to the house today to film a video teaser for the cookbook, and I needed to whip something up as my “prep at home, take to the gym” dish. This fit the bill perfectly.

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

Normally, I like to keep post-workout food pretty low in fat—which slows digestion—but eggs are a great tradeoff for busy folks. The lean chicken bumps up the protein content, and I added sweet potato for a good carb boost.

Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients for Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata

  • 9 large eggs, beaten
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) coconut oil or ghee
  • 1 large roasted sweet potato, cooled and roughly chopped*
  • 12 oz (340 g) lean ground chicken
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1 small head broccoli, stem removed, chopped small

Directions for Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F (177°C).
  2. In a large bowl, beat the eggs together with the smoked paprika, salt and pepper. Mix in the chopped sweet potato. Set aside.
  3. In a large cast iron skillet over medium-high heat, add the coconut oil. Then, sauté the chicken until it’s cooked through, about 4 minutes. Remove to a separate bowl.
  4. In the same skillet, add the onion and broccoli and sauté on medium heat until they are softened and slightly tender, about 6 to 8 minutes. Now, add the cooked chicken back to the pan.
  5. Pour the egg mixture into the skillet. Turn off the heat and stir the ingredients to combine.
  6. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until the eggs are set and not runny.
  7. Serve directly from the skillet or slice and store for leftovers.

*My weekly big food prep involves roasting half a dozen sweet potatoes. I line a baking sheet with foil, place the washed and unpeeled sweet potatoes on it, and get that into a 400°F (204°C) oven for about 45 minutes. I cool them, then store them in the fridge. When it’s time to use them, I just peel them! (The peels loosen right up after they cool.)

Remember to check out my cookbook! It comes out on January 6th!

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Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

Learn Olympic Weightlifting with Diane Fu

Learn Olympic Weightlifting—Diane Fu | stupideasypaleo.com

This week only!

Strength training and building muscle mass is so important for all of us, not just high-level athletes, but what if you don’t have your own personal coach? Meet me at the bar(bell) because I have the perfect thing to help you get started with weightlifting.

Weight training has done incredible things for me: I’ve gotten stronger and leaner, improved my balance and coordination, and—most surprisingly—become so much more confident. Today, I’m introducing you to my friend Diane Fu.

I met Diane a few years ago at the CrossFit Mobility seminar, and it was clear that she was not only an incredibly amazing athlete, she’s also fantastic coach. Diane posts so many helpful tips regularly on her Instagram page, and she teamed up with Cody to create this video-based training program.

Diane’s one of the best Olympic-style weightlifting coaches in the country and this week, I’m sharing this awesome program that she put together. Click here for a free preview!

This bundle is a 4-phase video-based training program to teach you the foundations of Olympic style lifting and ramp you up to lift fast and strong. Whether you are a CrossFitter looking to polish up your form or an Olympic weightlifting enthusiast, this plan will take the unknown out of your training and give you all that you need to add strength, speed, coordination, and flexibility to your lifts and to your performance.

The folks at Cody are offering you a super sweet deal—36% off!—this week only! Now you can get coaching from one of the best out there. Click here to learn more!

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Learn Olympic Weightlifting—Diane Fu | stupideasypaleo.com Have a question about weightlifting or strength training? Leave it in the comments below!

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash Recipe

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash doubles as a hearty fall dinner or a great game day appetizer. It takes a little advance planning because the pork gets the low and slow treatment in the slow cooker, but the meat can be made a day ahead of time and reheated after the squash is roasted. Or, just make the meat itself! There are tons of options here. If you omit the honey, this recipe is Whole30-friendly and just as tasty.

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com

Delicata squash are cylindrical and generally smaller than a butternut. You’ll recognize them by their yellow skin with long green stripes. The skin is thin and edible, the flesh creamy and a bit sweet. You can even experiment with different types of squash if you can’t find delicata—acorn would work well—but instead of four, you’ll probably only need two. I slice the squash boats in halves or thirds for appetizer portions or keep them whole for dinner. Serve with a side salad or some roasted veggies for a complete meal.

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com

If you’re ever interested in checking out the pastured pork from 5280 Meat in Colorado, my readers get 10% off any order with the code SEPaleo.

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash
Prep time: 
Total time: 

 

Ingredients
  • 3 lb (1361 g) pork shoulder or pork butt
  • 2 tsp (10 g) fine sea salt
  • ¼ cup (60 mL) stone ground mustard, divided in half
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) raw honey (omit for Whole30)
  • ¼ tsp cayenne pepper
  • 4 small delicata squash, halved and seeded
  • 2 tbsp (15 mL) melted fat or oil of choice
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  • Chopped parsley, for garnish

Instructions
  1. You’ll make this recipe in two parts. First, make the pulled pork because it needs 8 hours in the slow cooker. Overnight works really well.
  2. Place the pork shoulder in the slow cooker, then rub all over with the salt and half the mustard (about 2 tablespoons / 30 mL). Cover and cook on low for 8 hours. Remove the meat, place in a bowl and shred with two forks. (The cooking liquid can get quite salty which is why I don’t shred it in the slow cooker itself.) Mix in the other half of the mustard, the honey and the cayenne pepper.
  3. About 45 minutes before you want to serve the food, get the squash roasting in the oven. This can be done ahead of time, too, and then everything can be reheated.
  4. Preheat the oven to 400F (204C). Line a baking sheet with parchment or foil. Arrange the squash halves on the sheet with the empty boat side facing up, and drizzle with the melted fat or oil. Sprinkle with some salt and pepper, then roast for about 30-40 minutes or until the squash is tender and starting to lightly brown.

Notes
If you’re doing Whole30, check labels on the mustard and omit the honey.

Nutrition Information
Serving size: Serves 4 to 6

Click here to pin this recipe for Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash!

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question? Leave it in the comments below.

4 Things You Need To Know Before You Start Strength Training


4 Things You Need to Know Before You Start Strength Training | stupideasypaleo.com

Before you start strength training, there are four things you definitely need to consider.

Lifting heavy things and building muscle mass are incredibly important, especially as we pass into mid-adulthood and beyond. If you’ve been considering starting a strength program, check out my list of four things to look out for.

I shared it on The Paleo Mom’s website, where I was recently a guest blogger.

Click here to read 4 Things You Need to Know Before You Start Strength Training!

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4 Things You Need to Know Before You Start Strength Training | stupideasypaleo.com

Do you strength train? Let me know in the comments below!

Bonus Fitness & Nutrition Guide

Bonus Fitness & Nutrition Guide | stupideasypaleo.com

“Am I doing this right?” It’s a common question I hear from Paleo people all the time!

To go along with my upcoming cookbook—the one that comes out in just a bit over 8 weeks!—I created a companion bonus ebook called The Performance Paleo Cookbook Fitness & Nutrition Guide to help you figure out if you’re doing Paleo right!

The best part? If you pre-order the cookbook before November 31, 2014 on Amazon or Barnes & Noble, I’ll send you the Fitness & Nutrition Guide as way of saying thank you. I’m so incredibly grateful for all your support, and pre-ordering helps us know how many books to make. (Plus, you also save 25% off the regular price which is pretty sweet.)

Bonus Fitness & Nutrition Guide | stupideasypaleo.com

What’s in the Fitness & Nutrition Guide? It’s over 30 pages of great information about how to use the recipes in the book, plus a whole ton of other killer stuff like:

  • understanding how to eat Paleo for performance
  • what to eat and how to build a plate
  • how to approach pre- and post workout
  • sound training advice
  • how to get amazing sleep and reduce stress
  • practical tips for cooking
  • common Paleo pitfalls to avoid and
  • tons of awesome resources including my favorite products & discounts!

It’s like a mashup between my nutrition seminars and a miniature version of The Paleo Athlete all rolled into one, and it’s the perfect companion to the cookbook.

To get your bonus Fitness & Nutrition Guide, save your Amazon or Barnes & Noble order number, then fill out the simple form here. You’ll get access to the guide right away, and you can save the PDF ebook to your computer for later.

I’m so excited for you to get your bonus guide. I hope it gives you the tools and confidence to know that indeed, you are doing it right!

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Bonus Fitness & Nutrition Guide | stupideasypaleo.com

Remember to pre-order then get your guide here!

Protein Pumpkin Spice Coffee Recipe

Protein Pumpkin Spice Coffee | stupideasypaleo.com

I mean, what says fall more than pumpkin spice coffee? Recently, Food Babe blasted Starbucks for their fall favorite, the PSL (pumpkin spice latte), for its chemical-filled ingredients. I’ve never been a fan of the PSL, and a few years ago, I posted my own recipe for a homemade pumpkin spice latte right here on the blog.

Recently, I decided to give the recipe a face lift and added a protein punch, plus a sprinkle of my homemade pumpkin spice mix. If you’re not into protein powder (which is totally fine), I recommend my original recipe (here’s that link again) or you can just omit. I recommend this blend for athletes or people doing performance-oriented training as a good pre-workout snack or something light if you train semi-fasted. For more on my stance on whey protein, click here.

Protein Pumpkin Spice Coffee
Prep time: 
Total time: 

Serves: 1 serving
 

Ingredients
For the Coffee
To make Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice Mix (makes ¼ cup / 23 g)

Instructions
  1. Combine the coffee, protein powder, pumpkin puree, and spices in a blender. Blend on high for 15 seconds until it’s frothy.

Notes
*use the code SEPaleo on checkout for 10% off any SFH product

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Protein Pumpkin Spice Coffee | stupideasypaleo.com

What’s your favorite fall pumpkin creation?

Do I Need to Eat Post-Workout Meal?: Ask Steph

Do I Need to Eat a Post-Workout Meal? | stupideasypaleo.com

(Want to submit your own question to be featured on Ask Steph? Submit it via the contact form, and use the subject line “Ask Steph!”)

Adam C. writes:

Steph, I’m wondering if you can help me figure out if I need to eat a post-workout meal? I usually train 3 times a week at CrossFit, and I hike once a week. There’s so much confusing info out there!

Adam C.

Adam’s question is an incredibly common one, and something I hear a lot over at The Paleo Athlete Facebook page and after folks read The Paleo Athlete. Let’s break this down.

Nutrient Timing, Simplified

For the purpose of Adam’s question, I’m going to simplify this discussion. You can really go crazy with PubMed and Google Scholar, digging into the primary literature about pre-, intra-, and post-workout nutrition. My aim here is to provide a summary of the most salient points.

Eating protein and carbohydrate after training serves two main purposes. First, consuming protein means you’re supplying the necessary amino acids for repairing muscle (via a process called muscle protein synthesis). After muscle is worked in training, microtraumas must be repaired. Protein that is dense in the branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) is preferred, and that looks like meat, seafood, eggs and for some people, whey protein. (Click here to read my stance on whey.) For a complete list of BCAA-rich proteins that are compatible with a Paleo approach, click here.

Second, eating carbohydrate in an insulin-sensitive state helps replenish your main glycogen (stored glucose) tank: muscle. A smaller amount of glycogen is also stored in the liver but is not the primary source tapped into when you train hard. Consuming a carbohydrate that is rich in glucose after training is important, especially when said training is intense and / or long. What does that type of carbohydrate look like? Starchy vegetables such as sweet potatoes, white potatoes (click here to read my stance on white potatoes), plantains and yuca provide the most nutrient bang for the carbohydrate buck. For a complete list of carbohydrates that are compatible with a Paleo approach, click here.

It’s worth mentioning here that post-workout meals are best when they don’t contain fat (or contain very little). Why? Fat causes the stomach to empty slower which is counter to the point of the post-workout refuel. Save the fat for your three square meals a day.

How soon should you eat protein and carbs after your workout is over? That’ll be covered in the next section.

The Issue of Frequency

So, we’ve established that consuming protein and carbohydrate post-workout is important for recovery. But how soon after training do you need to eat it? Is there ever a time when you don’t need to eat post-workout?

When trying to help individuals determine if eating a post-workout meal is right for them, I always come back to this one factor: frequency. How often are you training and more critically, how much time do you have between training sessions?

Let’s compare two hypotheticals.

Adam trains 3 times a week (MWF) at CrossFit and hikes once a week, typically on Sunday. In Adam’s case, he has a full day to recover and refuel between each training session. Even though his intensity is high on MWF, he has time to replenish with regular meals. His Sunday hike, while it goes for a couple hours, is low on the intensity scale. Unless Adam is trying to aggressively gain mass, it’s unlikely that he will suffer from lack of a post-workout meal.

Contrast that to Lauren who trains 6 times a week (Tu-Sun). She’s a competitive cyclist who includes long rides on the weekends and interval training during the week. Also, two days a week she strength trains then goes for a ride, including intervals. On Fridays, she trains in the afternoon after work, and Saturday morning is a long ride with her club team. She takes Mondays off. Lauren is training far more frequently than Adam. She’s working out on back to back days, doing some double sessions, and including intensity in her training. Someone like Lauren would be wise to eat a post-workout meal not only from a caloric standpoint, but also to provide the substrate for recovery. Specifically, her Friday night post-workout refuel is really important because she’s got less than 12 hours between sessions.

It’s worth mentioning that Adam, while he trains, is not really interested in being a competitive athlete. Yes, he wants to improve his lifts and his benchmark workouts, but CrossFit for him is fun and a way to stay active. He’s not really driven by performance. Lauren, on the other hand, is training for some large national-level races and has specific performance goals. It’s an important distinction to make, because, as a performance-driven athlete, Lauren really needs to pay attention to her post-workout nutrition, sleep and recovery practices more than Adam.

To summarize, the more frequently you train (especially if those sessions include intensity and / or are back to back), the more important it is to eat a post-workout meal. And, when you’re training the next day, it’s generally best to eat a post-workout meal.

When and What to Eat Post-Workout?

If eating a post-workout meal (because you’re training frequently and performance is a priority), eat as soon as possible once training is over. If the workout was particularly intense and you’re drooling and sweating all over yourself, let your body relax a bit and get closer to a parasympathetic (rest and digest) state before trying to shove some food in your mouth. For most folks, 15-30 minutes after the workout ends is a good window, though some sources will say 15-60 minutes.

I don’t think it’s worth arguing about 30 minutes, but I will caution you against the following: You’re training like Lauren and waiting a few hours to eat anything. Remember, her schedule includes a high frequency of training. Getting nutrients in as soon as possible is her best bet.

What to eat is relatively simple: something with protein and carbohydrate. The options here depend a LOT on your lifestyle, time demands, food tolerances and personal preferences. Some people like leftover meat and sweet potatoes. Some people lean toward protein shakes with added carbohydrate for convenience. (Remember, supplements are not nutritionally superior to real food.) If you are trying to lean out a bit, I recommend avoiding liquid foods like protein shakes and sticking to solid foods.

The best way to find what works for you is to test it out and make some notes in your training log about what you ate, when you ate it, and what your recovery and performance are like. Click here for a list of protein and here for a list of carbs to get started. Shameless plug: My ebook The Paleo Athlete goes into a lot more detail about how much to eat (and the theory behind all this), and my upcoming cookbook has 100 recipes specifically for performance-minded folks (and it’s on early bird sale pricing from Amazon and Barnes and Noble right now).

How much to eat varies a lot and depends largely on things like body size and activity level. Click here to see some fueling tables, but please know that you’ll need to test things out. There’s no way I can possibly give specific recommendations for as wide and varied a readership as I have because I don’t know the details of your training and life. My best advice is to start with a modest amount of protein and carbs and track your recovery and performance data. Write down how much you ate (roughly, don’t be a crazy person carrying around a food scale) and when. Write down how you felt in training, if you felt recovered, etc. If you notice that over time you’re not performing well, it may be time to bump up your post-workout protein and / or carbohydrate.

For example, I might eat a chicken breast and half a sweet potato about 30 minutes after I train. If I do this for a couple weeks and notice that I feel really sluggish, sore and generally not recovered, I might bump it to a whole sweet potato. Then, I’ll stick to that for a couple weeks and note any changes.

Hopefully this has given you the tools to evaluate whether or not a post-workout meal is necessary for you.

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Do I Need to Eat a Post-Workout Meal? | stupideasypaleo.com

What do you usually eat post-workout? Leave your answer in the comments below.

Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com