Category Archives: Whole30

The Whole30 Gets an Update

The Whole30 Gets an Update | stupideasypaleo.com

If you’ve been a reader of the blog for a while, you’ll know I’m a huge proponent of, participant in and Envoy Extraordinaire for the Whole30 Program. (It helped me kick my sugar addiction.)

There have been a couple changes to the Whole30 recently, and an official site-wide Whole30 kicks off on August 1 through their site and social media, so you’ll have tons of support if you decide to start in a couple days. Don’t worry: You can do a Whole30 at any time, so if you can’t join in right away or you are a few days behind, it’s okay.

What is Whole30?

It’s a thirty day nutritional reset where you eliminate potentially problematic foods. Then, at the end, you can reintroduce the foods you want in a systematic way, note any negative or positive effects, and decide if / how you want to modify your dietary intake for the long-term. In other words, it’s about learning how food affects you. No lifelong promise to eat perfectly. No unsafe restriction of food. Nothing you have to pay a membership for.

Just you, learning about you + food for a month. That’s it.

What are the Whole30 Changes?

Recently, Whole30 made a couple modifications to its basic template. The biggest—and the one that caused more drama than Ronda Rousey at a Miesha Tate party—is that you can now eat white potatoes if you’re doing a Whole30. (This includes white potatoes with flesh of any color.) Click here to read WHY this change was made.

Remember, you never *HAVE TO* eat a food on Whole30 if you don’t want to, so if you think you’re better off without white potatoes, guess what? You don’t have to eat them. I’d recommend this for anyone who is sensitive to nightshades or is struggling with blood sugar regulation or losing significant body fat. And—whammy!—chips and French fries are excluded (To find out my position on white potatoes, click here.)

A minor change regarding table salt can be read here.

How Do I Get Started?

  1. Get your paws on a copy of It Starts With Food, the Whole30 book, and read it. Doing a Whole30 without reading it is sort of like speaking the words for another language without knowing what you’re actually saying. It works, but it’s less effective. How do I know that? I did my first Whole30 before ISWF was published. At the very least, peruse Whole30′s website and read all you can. Start with “Start Here!”
  2. Set a date. No, there will never be a month that doesn’t have a holiday or a friend’s wedding or a birthday celebration. You’ll have to deal with those when they come up. Commit. Put it on the calendar and get prepared.
  3. Remove “no” foods from your kitchen when possible, and stock up with “yes” foods. Here’s a good resource for that.
  4. Plan some meals. The possibilities are endless here. The official Whole30 Recipes feed on Instagram is AWESOME for getting inspiration. Plus, you won’t have to second guess if the ingredients really are Whole30-friendly or not. ISWF even has recipes in it, as does my site and many others (listed below).
  5. Jump in. Take one day at a time. Be mindful. Learn about yourself. Apply those lessons to your life. Go out and live. Be well.

Where Can I Find Resources?

Questions? Write them in the comments below.

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The Whole30 Gets an Update | stupideasypaleo.com

Bone Broth 101: How to Make the Best Broth

Bone Broth 101 | stupideasypaleo.com

Bone Broth 101: How to Make the Best Broth

Steph’s note: Today’s awesome tutorial is brought to you by Ryan Harvey, founder of Bare Bones Broth Co. Bare Bones offers hand-crafted broth shipped right to you, but if you’re more of a DIY type of person, Ryan shares some of the secrets for making the best bone broth right here for you.

All About Bone Broth

So what’s the big deal with bone broth these days? It has less to do with bone broth and more to do with the rising awareness of the role our gut health plays in the overall health of our mind, body and soul.

We’re finally starting to acknowledge that what we use to fuel our bodies directly affects the way we think, the things we do and how well we do them. Often referred to as our “second brain,” the human gut is home to over 10 trillion bacteria, a number no human can fully comprehend, yet we’re always looking for and believing in that one all-inclusive lab-manufactured antidote promised to make us feel better.

News flash: There isn’t just one food, one medicine or one supplement. There is, however, bone broth, which can be added to any diet as any or all three of these things. What other real food source contains as many bio-available vitamins and easily assimilated nutrients and extracts of pure collagen (A.K.A gelatin), skin, bone and fat ⎼ you know, the stuff that pretty much makes us human, gives us our silky smooth skin and allows us to grunt beautifully while hitting our max power snatch with ease.

Funny thing about bone broth: It’s nothing new. In fact, broths and stocks have been used for centuries by cultures around the world as a remedy to anything and everything. It also happens to be the base for all cooking, as it’s the first thing you would learn how to make in kitchens around the world as a chef’s apprentice or culinary student.

It’s what stops a stomachache dead in its tracks by soothing and healing the gut, and it quickly returns our joints to normal after an intense workout or rigorous hike. We have the natural occurring gelatin and glucosamine to thank for this; something all commercially available broths lack.

With that said, I want to share a handful of factors that will influence the outcome of your homemade bone broth. Got gelatin?

Factor #1 That Makes Great Bone Broth: Animal’s Upbringing

When deciding how to fuel my body, I always ask where my fuel came from and how it came to be.

Chances are, if you are here reading this then you and I have something in common. It’s no secret that what the animal eats, we eat. This doesn’t just apply to meat. Bones contain marrow, and marrow in turn pretty much contains the essence of our being.

If we’re healthy, that’s great but if we’re sick, our marrow is sick. The same goes for animals. The whole idea is that we’re extracting all this healthy good stuff from the animal and using it as both a food and a medicine for our bodies.

Believe it or not, this all matters on a molecular level, where everything that makes you you is working hard to maintain your optimal health as efficiently as possible. If the animal was factory farmed, ate garbage and didn’t see a pasture a day in its life, you won’t be doing your body any favors in the long run by using its bones.

Pardon my soapbox, but supporting the ranchers and farmers that raise pastured animals and grow organic produce is the only way we’ll ever see a change in our current food system. You want better access to healthy and sustainably raised meats and fresh produce? Then find and support a farm. I’ve seen numerous farms and ranches here in Southern California grow rapidly under the support of enthusiastic communities looking towards a better future in food.

Factor #2 That Makes Great Bone Broth: Animal’s Age 

That’s right. Animals are no different from us in that their bones and joints wear down and degrade over time, reducing the amount of connective tissue and consequently reducing the amount of gelatin that will end up in your broth.

The younger the animal, the more gelatinous your broth will be. Veal bones, joints, feet and necks would yield the most gelatin, as these animals are butchered very young.

You can usually find veal bones at a local butcher for a decent price. Stocks made from veal are a chef’s secret weapon in the kitchen, taking everything from soups and sauces to risottos and braised meats to the next level.

Factor #3 That Makes Great Bone Broth: Bone Type

This is where most people run into trouble.

In my experience the most commercially available bones are usually beef or veal femurs. Femurs are great as they contain a ton of marrow but very little collagen. You want a good mix of bones, joints and feet. I suggest using a 1:1:1 ratio of bones, joints and feet. This will almost guarantee you achieve that victorious gel.

Just remember to always use joints and feet, this is where you will find the most collagen. If you can’t find all of these, go ahead and make your broth with whatever you can get your hands on, you’ll still benefit greatly from the added vitamins and nutrients.

Factor #4 That Makes Great Bone Broth: Bone to Water Ratio 

Whether it’s in a crockpot or on your stove, add water just to cover the bones, and no more.

This is where a lot of folks think they’ve messed up. You’ve spent all those hours simmering away, finally cooling and refrigerating your liquid gold only to wake up in the morning to find no jiggle. You haven’t been defeated! Simply bring your broth back up to a gentle simmer and let evaporation take over. Reduce your broth by an inch or so, cool and refrigerate. If it’s still not jiggling, repeat the process.

A combination of things could have happened here – too much water, bones from sick animals, or you simply didn’t let it simmer long enough. In most cases, the gelatin simply isn’t concentrated enough to give your broth a Jello-like consistency. This is OKAY. Your broth is still loaded with plenty of good stuff.

Try not to get so caught up on the aesthetics. I see people everyday crying out for help because their broth didn’t gel, as if the broth gods are smiting their attempt at glory.

Factor #5 That Makes Great Bone Broth: Time

The beautiful thing about making broth is that once started, it requires very little attention.

The biggest issue here is not letting your broth simmer long enough. We simmer our beef broth for 48 hours and 24 hours for our chicken. Simmering for multiple days is a great way to really get everything out of the bones.

Something we do, and that I highly suggest, is to wait until you have 6-8 hours left to add your vegetables or leafy greens, such as parsley or leaves on your celery. This will prevent any bitter or burnt tastes from being imparted into your broth. The vegetables can only be cooked for so long before they begin to break down, giving your broth and undesirable and often burnt flavor.

It only takes 8 or so hours at a simmer to extract the nutrients and flavor from them, anyway. Anything much longer than this and the vegetables become sponges, soaking up all your hard-earned nutrients.

In my opinion, those are the most important things to keep in mind when making bone broth. As with most things, the more you make it the better you will get. And the better you will get at noticing all these little idiosyncrasies during the process, like waiting to add your veggies until later in the process. It took me several burnt, bitter and off-flavored batches before I finally started figuring out at what times to add what ingredients.

A Simple Bone Broth Recipe

Run through this simple checklist when making any bone broth your gut desires:

  • Roast any bones beforehand for added depth and flavor, except fish.
  • Put bones in pot and add water just to cover bones.
  • Add your acid to help draw out the good stuff. We use apple cider vinegar.
  • Bring to a boil and then reduce to a simmer.
  • Skim, skim and skim some more. Scum and impurities rise to the top during the initial simmer phase. Simply skim, discard and keep simmering.
  • Once there is no longer any scum rising to the surface, keep simmering, adding water only to cover the bones as necessary.
  • Prep your veggies. Peel onions, as the peel can impart a burnt or bitter flavor.
  • After about 15-18 hours for chicken and 35-40 hours for beef, add your veggies, herbs and spices. Wait until the final hour to add parsley or celery leaves.
  • Return to a simmer for the final leg, and this time don’t worry about adding more water. You want the nutrients and gelatin to concentrate as we bring in the flavors from the veggies and herbs.
  • Add your parsley and / or celery greens if desired. Let simmer for another hour or two.
  • That’s it. You’ve done it! Strain your broth and cool it down or use immediately for making your favorite soup, stew, sauce or meat dish!

If you’re ever short on time or can’t seem to procure bones from healthy animals come check us out at Bare Bones Broth Co.! We’ll ship our broths directly to your door, nationwide!

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Bone Broth 101 | stupideasypaleo.com

Questions about making bone broth? Leave them in the comments below!

July Giveaway: PurePharma Prize Pack

July Giveaway: PurePharma Prize Pack | stupideasypaleo.com

July’s giveaway is a prize pack of fish oil, magnesium and vitamin D from my friends at PurePharma!

When it comes to supplements, I’m a minimalist and a skeptic by nature. I don’t rely on pills, powders and potions because when it comes down to it, good nutrition must have its roots in good nutrition. Put another way, trying to supplement your way out of a consistently poor diet is missing the point.

That being said, there are definitely exceptions I make when it comes to supplements, and this trio of products from PurePharma has been a consistent part of my regimen for the last three years and counting. I don’t take them all every single day; rather, it depends on what my diet might be lacking (because not even Paleo nutritionists are perfect) or I happen to be getting more of. For example, when I eat a gorgeous piece of wild salmon for dinner, I generally skip out on supplementing with fish oil. When I haven’t been training as hard, I’ll usually pass on the magnesium.

PurePharma is growing in popularity especially amongst the CrossFit community, but make no mistake: the core trio of fish oil, magnesium and vitamin D can be used by anyone, athlete or not. When I train hard, I feel confident taking PurePharma to supplement my diet because I know their products are backed by science and verified by stringent quality measures.

A little bit about the products:

PurePharma O3 is the ultra-pure fish oil with a 5:2 EPA/DHA ratio. I take it in small doses particularly because it calms the inflammation I tend to get from training. The Omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil are known to support heart, brain and eye health, too. Read more here.

PurePharma M3 is probably my favorite of the three. It’s two forms of magnesium (they’re way easier on the colon than Natural Calm), plus zinc. Mag and zinc assist in muscle recovery and help maintain electrolyte balance. Plus, when taken at night, many folks (including me) enjoy a calming effect. Read more here.

PurePharma D3 is vitamin D combined with coconut oil for better absorption. Vitamin D is implicated in many aspects of health including bone integrity and immunity. It might come as a surprise that most people are deficient in vitamin D, even those of us living in sunny locales. Read more here.

Here’s what’s up for grabs!

One PurePharma prize pack containing:

To enter for a chance to win a PurePharma prize pack!

#1 Use the Rafflecopter widget below to finalize your entry and unlock other bonus entries! (This is how the winner will be drawn, so don’t skip this step!)

#2 In the comments below, tell me which of the three (fish oil, magnesium or vitamin D) you’re most interested in trying!

Enter here:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The contest ends July 31, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. PST, and the winner will be announced here on the blog by August 2, 2014. Be sure to check back to see if you won!

The winner will be emailed and will have 48 hours to confirm back with his or her full name, address, and phone number to claim the prize. Open to readers worldwide.

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July Giveaway: PurePharma Prize Pack | stupideasypaleo.com

Comment below with which product you’d be most psyched to try out!

Paleo Baked Avocado Fries

Paleo Baked Avocado Fries | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Baked Avocado Fries are a deliciously different way to enjoy this healthy fat source in your diet.

This appetizer was inspired by a dish the hubs and I enjoyed at a local cafe. While their version was gluten-free, I’m pretty certain they used rice flour and deep fried them. Convinced I could do better, I took some time off from shooting pics for The Performance Paleo Cookbook and developed these delectable little snacks. My first experiment worked! (These are also reminiscent of Fed and Fit’s brilliant guest post for Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers.)

Basically, you’ll coat the avocado “fries” with crushed pork rinds. They bake up brown and crisp! I like this brand the best because it’s just pork, olive oil and salt already crushed up and ready to use. You’ll coat the avocado in arrowroot (tapioca) flour, egg wash, and finally seasoned pork rinds, then bake and eat. If you have Flavor God seasonings, just sub the spices in this recipe for 2 Tablespoons of any variety.

If you can’t eat eggs, I made a version without. Though I don’t have exact quantities, all I did was replace the egg with stone-ground mustard that I thinned with a little water. The result was just as tasty.

Ingredients for Paleo Baked Avocado Fries

Serves 2 to 4.

Directions for Paleo Baked Avocado Fries

  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F (218°C), and line a baking sheet with foil.
  2. Slice the avocados in half, and carefully remove the pit. (To do that, place the avocado on a cutting board, and gently but firmly thwack the pit with a knife, then twist.) Cut each half into three or four slices, and set them aside.
  3. You’ll need three small bowls for the dipping stations. In the first, combine the arrowroot and half the seasonings. In the second, combine the beaten egg, water and mustard. In the third, combine the pork rinds and the other half of the seasonings.
  4. Dip the avocado slices into the arrowroot, then the eggs, then the pork rinds. Lay them on the baking sheet. When they’re all dipped, bake the avocado fries for 10 to 12 minutes, then flip and bake another 2 to 4 minutes. They’re best enjoyed while they’re fresh!

*Tip: To select avocados that aren’t overripe, flick off the stem. If it’s white / green underneath, you still have time before it’s mushy and brown. If it’s brown, avoid.

Paleo Baked Avocado Fries | stupideasypaleo.com

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Paleo Baked Avocado Fries | stupideasypaleo.com

Questions? Leave a comment below, and I’ll get back to you!

Paleo Portion Sizes: How Much Is Just Right?

Paleo Portion Sizes—How Much is Just Right? | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo portion sizes—how much is just right?

It’s a very common question I hear all the time, and rightly so. When you’re just starting out with Paleo, especially if you’re coming from a past of calorie-counting (and generally restriction) or other portion control tactics, it can be intimidating to think you’re just going to wing what goes on your plate.

The simple—and perhaps frustrating—thing is that there is no one correct Paleo portion size. If there was a magic calculator where I could plug in your age, sex, current weight and activity level and pop out a perfect number of calories, I’d be rich! Oh wait, there are already dozens, if not hundreds of websites (and books) that claim to do this. They all fail in my eyes and here’s why.

The Trouble with Calories

Let’s say you use AmazingCalorieCalculator.com (not a real site) to figure out your perfect caloric intake. It says 1400. So, you go about your time reading food labels and quantifying everything that passes your lips. Whether you’re paying attention to food quality or not at all—1400 calories could be meat, veggies and sweet potatoes or a mega-giant pile of M&Ms—even if you meet 1400 calories, you might still be underfed.

See the problem? If you’re trying to hit a caloric maximum for the day and end up still feeling hungry, low on energy, body composition not improving, moody and irritable and sleeping poorly, that’s a huge sign that something is amiss. (Into macros? Read more about The Problem with Macros).

One other thing: Paleo is not about severe restriction of calories or macronutrients. You’ll be nourishing your body, and while you may lose weight (fat) there are myriad other ways your health can improve. Here’s a list to read.

It’s Not a Caloric Free-For-All Either

While the “calories in-calories out” idea is basically debunked, it’s pretty fallacious to think one can binge on sticks of grass-fed butter, eat pounds of nuts and a side of beef daily and find optimum health. All food has calories, and how those foods affect our bodies biochemically is not the same. (For more on calories, I highly recommend this book.)

Where folks often find trouble with Paleo portion sizes is thinking everything is unrestricted. Eating a little too much one day and a little less the next isn’t a huge problem. Chronic overconsumption of calories, even from “good” foods like those that fit a Paleo template, can also lead to issues.

So, how much is just right?

Paleo Portion Sizes: Some Simple Rules

Following these simple rules when you’re starting Paleo will give you a framework around how to build a meal. It’s by no means an exact science. Remember, you’ll have to pay attention to the outcomes of what you eat. To borrow a Robb Wolf-ism, “How do you look, feel and perform?” It may take a while (read: a few weeks to months to even a year) to be able to eat intuitively without thinking about every morsel you put on your plate.

Paleo Portion Sizes Rule #1: Eat three meals a day.

Breakfast is not an option. Coffee is not breakfast. Three times a day, fill a plate with protein, veggies and some fruit, and healthy fat. If you’re training hard for a sport, eating a bit of protein and carb after your training session is a small fourth meal. (Learn more about that here.)

I get questions all the time about intermittent fasting, and it’s my belief that 1) it’s not for everyone and 2) you don’t earn the right to fast until you’ve been eating Paleo for at least six months. Feel free to disagree, but if you’re still a newb, eating full meals and getting accustomed to what that’s like and how it makes you feel is critical. Trying to food hack your way into Paleo when you’re starting doesn’t actually teach you how to eat properly.

For a visual on what a balanced plate looks like, see this guide by my friends at Whole30.

Paleo Portion Sizes Rule #2: Eat a balanced plate.

Protein, carbohydrate (in the form of veggies, fruit and starchy veggies…a mixture throughout the day, not necessarily all three on one plate) and fat need to feature at every meal. Remember, don’t start food-hacking your diet if you’ve just started Paleo. Give it time for your hormones to normalize and for real change to happen before you go for the trendy stuff.

Recognize that if you have more body mass, you need to eat proportionally more food compared to someone who has a smaller body mass. Example: If your friend weighs 60kg and eats 3 eggs at breakfast but you weight 100kg, that doesn’t mean 3 eggs is an appropriate amount of protein for you. It’s probably not enough.

Paleo Portion Sizes Rule #3: Reduce your dependence on snacks.

Snacks happen. That’s life. But, if you’re packing two or more sets of snacks daily to eat between meals, you need to eat more at meal time. Period.

Going 4 to 6 hours comfortably between meals is NORMAL. It gives our bodies time to digest what we’ve eaten and then lets our guts rest for a while. You’re not a cow, and you don’t need to graze all day. It doesn’t “rev your metabolism” or any of the other sexy claims you hear. What it does do is put constant demand on your digestive system to deal with a perpetual influx of food.

If you’re hungry after 2 to 3 hours, eat a bit more at meal time: a couple extra ounces of meat, another handful of veggies, another spoonful of fat, etc.

Paleo Portion Sizes: How to tell if they’re working.

Eating appropriate amounts of nourishing foods should support:

  • normalized body composition (reduced fat and increased muscle) OVER TIME.
  • stable energy throughout the day.
  • clear-headedness and mental acuity.
  • restorative and restful sleep.
  • a feeling of satiety after meals.
  • good mood.
  • a healthy sex drive.

These are just a few ways to tell if what you’re eating is really helping you thrive!

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Paleo Portion Sizes—How Much is Just Right? | stupideasypaleo.com

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Kohlrabi Salad with Apple Ginger Vinaigrette

Kohlrabi Salad with Apple Ginger Vinaigrette | stupideasypaleo.com

Kohlrabi is definitely not a vegetable I’d ever had gumption to try. Its funky, globular shape and oddly placed leaves always looked so strange to me. Let’s just say, kohlrabi was never on the menu…until now. I picked up a bunch at the store a few days ago and decided it was high time I give kohlrabi a try.

Interestingly, the word kohlrabi is a mashup of German phraseology that translates roughly into “cabbage turnip.” The flavor tastes of mild cabbage or something like broccoli stem but without the sulfurous undertones. In terms of nutrition, it’s rich in Vitamin C and the healthy phytochemicals that other members of the Brassica family are renowned for.

Photo Jun 14, 11 29 23 AM

I prepared this kohlrabi like a salad, but if you’ve got more time, you could certainly slice it thinner / smaller like a slaw. The simple apple ginger vinaigrette is a great complement to the kohlrabi’s crunch.

Ingredients for the Kohlrabi Salad with Apple Ginger Vinaigrette

For the Salad

  • 1 lb (454 g) kohlrabi, tops removed, halved and sliced
  • 1/4 lb (113 g) carrots, halved and sliced
  • 1/4 lb (113 g) red apple (I like Pink Lady, about half an apple), sliced
  • 1/4 cup packed (3 oz / 85 g) fresh parsley
  • 2 large (1 oz / 28 g) green onions, white and light green parts, sliced
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste

For the Dressing

  • 1/4 lb (113 g) red apple (I like Pink Lady, about half an apple), chopped
  • 1/2 inch (1.3 cm) piece of ginger, peeled and finely chopped
  • 3 Tablespoons (45 mL) apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 tsp (2 g) sea salt
  • 1/8 tsp (0.5 g) black pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons (30 mL) light-tasting olive oil or avocado oil

Directions for the Kohlrabi Salad with Apple Ginger Vinaigrette

  1. Prepare the salad by mixing the salad ingredients together in a large bowl. Set aside.
  2. Make the dressing by combining the apple, ginger, apple cider vinegar, salt and pepper in a high-powered blender or food processor. Run the blender until the mixture is broken down and starts to liquify, then with the motor running, drizzle in the olive oil.
  3. Pour the dressing over the salad and mix thoroughly to combine.

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kohlrabi2

When Cheap is Actually Good

The Paleo Athlete Kindle Buck Sale | stupideasypaleo.com When I was about 21, I bought a car for $500. It was a beat up, white Plymouth Acclaim with maroon interior, and it sounded like a two-pack-a-day smoker when it ran. Sure, it got me back and forth the few miles between my college dorm and my job as a cake decorator at a local supermarket—how’s *that* for someone who was totally sugar addicted?!—but I knew its low sticker price was too good to be true.

As is with most things that are cheap, it was only a few months until the transmission seized, and I was sans ride.

From that point on, I’ve been a firm believer in the mantra, “Nothing cheap is worth buying.” Whether it’s food or books or even cars, I’ve held fast to the idea that you get what you pay for. When I see a deal that’s too good to pass up, it means I usually walk on by. That’s why I hemmed and hawed for quite a while about what’s going on today until midnight.

Yep, here’s something that’s cheap AND good.

Today, June 18, 2014 and today only, you can get the Kindle version of “The Paleo Athlete” for a buck. One smackaroo. Practically pennies. So cheap you’ll think you stole it. And once the clock strikes midnight tonight, just like a proper Cinderella, it goes back to its regular Kindle price of $9.99.

It’s never been on sale before, not in the 6 months since it was published, and it’ll never be on sale again. So, if you’ve been eyeing it or going to Amazon and hovering over the “Buy it now” button, today—no, right now—is the time to get it. If you don’t have a Kindle reader (I know I don’t), the folks at Amazon have made it really easy to read ebooks by making free reader apps for virtually any device—except flip phones. Time to enter the future, my friend!

Why does “The Paleo Athlete” rule? It teaches you how to eat Paleo for performance. If you care about getting stronger and faster, having better endurance and being able to not just make it to the end of your training session but smashing it, this book is what you’ve been waiting for. Or, if you care about being Happy, Healthy and Harder To Kill™—someone who’s ready for the zombie apocalypse or the White Walkers beyond The Wall—this book is for you.

You won’t have to walk around with a calculator attached to your hip, logging in points or calories or macros or blocks. Blah. You don’t have time to do that. Instead, I teach you the what and why so you can adjust your nutrition to virtually any performance goal or training scenario. Learn how to prep for competition day, too, and get 30 recipes to get you started and on your way.

Sound good? Good. Cheap but definitely one of those rare moments where it’s worth every penny. All 99 of them.

Get “The Paleo Athlete” Kindle version right now for a buck!

Offer expires June 18, 2014 at 11:59 pm PT, Cinderella-like.

June Giveaway: Elete Electrolyte Prize Packs

June Giveaway: Elete Electrolyte Prize Packs | stupideasypaleo.com

With summer about to officially start on June 21, I’m super excited to share this month’s giveaway with you!

Maintaining a proper electrolyte level when you’re exerting yourself through training or even strenuous work is really important. They help keep your muscles and nervous system functioning properly and guard against dehydration. Unfortunately, many electrolyte replacements available on the market are rammed with sugar and artificial ingredients. And that’s where Elete comes in! It’s a tasteless, colorless, sugarless liquid that contains vital electrolytes: sodium, magnesium, potassium and chloride.

Elete is something I’ve personally used since 2009 when I was racing mountain bikes, and I’ve definitely felt the effects of not using it—especially when I suffered severe double quad cramps during a 6 hour endurance mountain bike race in 2011. Coconut water has become a popular option for naturally occurring electrolytes, but know that it’s very low in sodium so isn’t actually a complete replacement. Bonus: Elete products are Whole30-approved.

Here’s what’s up for grabs!

THREE winners will each receive a prize pack worth over $40 with:

To enter for a chance to win an Elete prize pack!

The giveaway is now closed and winners are displayed on the widget below.

#1 Use the Rafflecopter widget below to finalize your entry and unlock other bonus entries! (This is how the winner will be drawn, so don’t skip this step!)

#2 In the comments below, tell me what sport or training you do and / or when you’d use Elete!

Enter here:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The contest ends June 30, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. PST, and the winner will be announced here on the blog by July 2, 2014. Be sure to check back to see if you won!

The winner will be emailed and will have 48 hours to confirm back with his or her full name, address, and phone number to claim the prize. Open to readers worldwide. If a non-US resident wins, an Amazon gift card for $40 will be provided.

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June Giveaway: Elete Electrolyte Prize Packs | stupideasypaleo.com

Comment below with the sport / training you do or when you’d use Elete!

Easy Paleo Chicken Curry

Easy Paleo Chicken Curry—The Merrymaker Sisters | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: I’m really chuffed to introduce you to my guest bloggers Emma and Carla, the dynamic sister duo behind The Merrymaker Sisters! These two creative minds come up with all sorts of amazing Paleo food, both savory and sweet. Emma and Carla are well-known in the Australian Paleo world, and I know you’ll love what they’re doing down under. Definitely check out their site and social media for lots of great inspiration. Take it away, ladies!

Serves: 4  Cook Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients for Easy Paleo Chicken Curry

  • 6 boneless chicken thighs, diced
  • 1 yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 cup (237 mL) canned pumpkin puree
  • 2 medium zucchini, sliced
  • 
2 cups button mushrooms, sliced
  • 1/4 cup (118 mL) water
  • 2 Tablespoons (30 g) ghee or coconut oil
  • 1/2 Tablespoon (3 g) turmeric
  • 1/2 Tablespoon (3 g) paprika
  • 1 teaspoon (0.6 g) red pepper flakes
  • 1 teaspoon (2 g) cumin

Easy Paleo Chicken Curry—The Merrymaker Sisters | stupideasypaleo.com

Directions for Easy Paleo Chicken Curry

  1. In a large saucepan over high heat, melt the ghee. Add the onion and spices and sauté.
  2. Add the chicken and cook until the sides have just turned white.
  3. Turn down the heat to low and add the pureed pumpkin and water. Stir until combined and then cover and allow to simmer for 15 minutes.
  4. At the 10 minute mark, add the zucchini and mushrooms.
  5. Serve with a dollop of coconut cream, fresh cilantro / coriander and a side of cauli rice! Make sure you make enough for leftovers! Curries are always better the next day right?!

Stay in touch with The Merrymaker Sisters on social media: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

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Easy Paleo Chicken Curry—The Merrymaker Sisters | stupideasypaleo.com

Questions for The Merrymaker Sisters? Leave them in the comments below!

Sweet Plantain Guacamole—Plus a Chance To Win The Paleo Kitchen

Sweet Plantain Guacamole—The Paleo Kitchen | stupideasypaleo.com

Guacamole is pretty much like heaven to me. Packed with healthy fats, this combination of luscious, creamy avocado mixed with any variety of spices, herbs and aromatics is pretty great on just about anything. This recipe, one from the soon to be released book The Paleo Kitchen by George Bryant and Juli Bauer, adds a twist to the standard guac: plantains. That’s right. Plantains. These ripe beauties—a great source of healthy carbohydrate—are softened and then folded right in!

While you’re here, be sure to scroll down to enter the giveaway to win your very own free copy of The Paleo Kitchen! The photos alone are drool-inducing. This is a flash giveaway which ends Sunday June 8th at 11:59 PT, so enter now!

Serves: 4

Prep Time: 15 Minutes

Cook Time: 10 Minutes

Ingredients for Sweet Plantain Guacamole

  • 2 Tablespoons coconut oil
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 large brown plantain, peeled and diced
  • 2 Tablespoons water
  • 3 large avocados, cut in half, pits removed
  • 1/4 medium white onion, finely chopped (30 grams)
  • Handful of cilantro, roughly chopped
  • 1 teaspoon finely chopped jalapeno
  • Juice of 1/2 lime
  • 1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Directions for Sweet Plantain Guacamole

  1. Place a small skillet over medium heat and add the coconut oil.
  2. Once the coconut oil is hot, add half of the garlic to the pan along with diced plantain.
  3. When the plantain dice begin to brown, salt them, and then flip to brown on other side.
  4. Add the water to the pan and cover to steam the plantain. Once the plantain dice are soft, remove from the heat and let cool.
  5. While the plantain finishes cooking, scoop out the insides of the pitted avocados and add to a large bowl to mash. Mash up the avocado with a fork. Add the onion, cilantro, jalapeno, lime juice, smoked paprika, and salt and pepper. Mix well, then fold in the plantains. Chill in the refrigerator before serving.

To enter for a chance to win a free copy of The Paleo Kitchen!

Use the Rafflecopter widget below to finalize your entry and unlock other bonus entries! (This is how the winner will be drawn, so don’t skip this step!)

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The contest ends June 8, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. PT, and the winner will be announced here on the blog by June 10, 2014. Be sure to check back to see if you won!

The winner will be emailed and will have 48 hours to confirm back with his or her full name, address, and phone number to claim the prize. Open to US residents only.

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Sweet Plantain Guacamole—The Paleo Kitchen | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Avocado Bacon Sliders

Paleo Avocado Bacon Sliders | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: Please welcome my guest blogger Ashley from Livin Paleo! I first learned of Ashley through her Instagram account where I saw her throwing around heavy barbells, so needless to say, she became an instant girl crush. She’s a CrossFit badass—competing in the NorCal Regionals soon—and a whiz in the Paleo kitchen, coming up with all sorts of simple but really tasty eats to fuel her endeavors. Definitely check out her blog for lots of awesome gluten free bites. Take it away, Ashley!

Serves: 6      Prep Time: 15 min      Cook Time: 30 min

Ingredients for Paleo Avocado Bacon Sliders

  • 1 large sweet potato
  • 1 pound (454 grams) ground beef
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon (2.5 grams) salt 
  • 1/4 teaspoon (0.5 grams) black pepper
  • 1/4 pound (115 grams) bacon
  • 1 red bell pepper, sliced
  • 1/2 onion, chopped
  • 1 avocado
  • 1/2 tablespoon (22 mL) lime juice
  • Olive oil or fat of choice for cooking
  • 1/2 head romaine lettuce

Directions for Paleo Avocado Bacon Sliders

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F (204°C).
  2. Wash the sweet potato and cut into 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) slices.
  3. Line two baking sheets with foil or parchment paper, lightly coat one with olive oil or fat of choice and lay out the sweet potato slices. You will need 12 slices. Lay out the bacon on the other sheet.
  4. Bake both for 20−25 minutes. Flip the bacon and sweet potatoes halfway through. While the sweet potatoes and bacon cook prepare the burgers, bell pepper and onions, and smash the avocado.
  5. In a medium bowl combine the ground beef, minced garlic, salt and pepper and form into six patties.
  6. Heat olive oil or fat of choice in a large skillet over medium heat and add the patties. Cook for about 5 minutes on each side.
  7. Heat olive oil or fat of choice in a separate small skillet over medium heat and cook the bell pepper and onions until soft and slightly charred.
  8. In a medium bowl smash together the avocado and lime juice. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  9. Assemble each slider by topping a sweet potato slice with lettuce, a burger patty, bacon, smashed avocado, bell pepper and onions and another sweet potato slice.

You can connect with Ashley via social media here: blog, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest.

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Paleo Avocado Bacon Sliders | stupideasypaleo.com

Questions for Ashley? Leave them in the comments below!

Chicken Florentine Spaghetti Squash (Paleo)

Chicken Florentine Spaghetti Squash | Popular Paleo for StupidEasyPaleo.com

Steph’s note: Please welcome Ciarra from Popular Paleo back to the blog. Not only is she a close personal friend of mine, she’s a whiz in the kitchen AND she’s just finished writing a cookbook (releasing December 2nd so click here to pre-order) called The Frugal Paleo Cookbook: Affordable, Easy & Delicious Paleo Cooking. I know y’all are going to love it because she’s done an amazing job. (I got to test drive some of the recipes!) This Chicken Florentine dish is representative of the budget-friendly bites she’s known for. Take it away, Ciarra!

I have a not-so-secret love affair with spaghetti squash, but in my part of the country (the Pacific Northwest) it can get expensive depending on the time of year. Since I make one Paleo-friendly meal to feed my little semi-Paleo family of four each night for dinner, I’m always looking for ways to stretch a pricier ingredient. For spaghetti squash, I do that by mixing it up with chicken Italian sausage and fresh organic baby spinach for Chicken Florentine Spaghetti Squash Boats. I like to serve it all in the shell of the spaghetti squash and top it some fresh herbs and pine nuts if I have some hanging around in my pantry.

Serves 4

Ingredients for Chicken Florentine Spaghetti Squash Boats

  • 1 medium to large spaghetti squash
  • 16 ounces (454 grams) chicken Italian sausage (organic, gluten-free)
  • 1 organic white or yellow onion, diced
  • 2–3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 cups (700 grams) organic baby spinach leaves, packed into measuring cup
  • 2–3 tablespoons (30–45 mL) extra virgin olive oil
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  • Optional: 1 tablespoon (7 grams) pine nuts and chopped flat-leaf parsley

Directions for Chicken Florentine Spaghetti Squash Boats

  1. First things first, let’s get that spaghetti squash in the oven to roast while we prepare the filling. Preheat the oven to 400°F (204°C). Using a large knife and steady hand, split the squash in half lengthwise. The best way to do this is usually by scoring the squash and then inserting the tip of the blade into an end. Apply strong and even pressure on the knife, using it more like a splitting wedge on a large log rather than the familiar slicing action of a blade. Once the squash is split open, use a spoon to remove the seeds and pulp (just toss that stuff). Place the halved squash cut-side down on a roasting pan, add a few tablespoons of water to the pan and roast for 35 to 40 minutes in a preheated oven.
  2. Meanwhile, prepare the chicken Florentine portion of the dish. Heat a large skillet to medium-high and drizzle in a few tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil. Once it comes to temp, crumble in the chicken Italian sausage, garlic and diced onion. Cook and stir until the sausage is fully cooked and the onion is translucent—this should take about 12 minutes or so. A few minutes before the meat is done, pile the baby spinach on top of the sausage so that it wilts as the rest of the items in the pan finish. Stir the spinach into the sausage mixture as it cooks down. Then set it aside until the spaghetti squash has finished roasting.
  3. After you pull the squash out of the oven, turn them over so they cool a little faster. Once you can handle them comfortably (or if you can manage holding them with an oven mitt), use a fork to scrape with the grain of the squash to harvest the strands. Transfer the harvested strands into the pan with the sausage mixture, season with sea salt and black pepper to taste and the pine nuts if you want to use them. Toss the squash strands with the sausage and spinach so everything gets evenly combined.
  4. I like to serve this plated inside the spaghetti squash shell or “boat-style.” It’s pretty and, well, if I can save myself another dish to wash, then I’m all for it. Top with some toasted pine nuts and / or fresh flat-leaf parsley and dig in!

P.S.: If you happen to have any leftovers, this makes a great frittata for breakfast or a to-go lunch the next day!

Be sure to follow Ciarra and Popular Paleo on: Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter and Instagram!

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Chicken Florentine Spaghetti Squash | Popular Paleo for StupidEasyPaleo.com

Questions for Ciarra? Leave them in the comments below!

Avocado BLT Egg Salad

Steph’s note: I’m really chuffed to be featuring Lexi from Lexi’s Clean Kitchen on the blog today! I first noticed her drool-worthy recipes on Instagram, and her dishes are really approachable and simple. Lexi specializes in gluten-free, dairy-free and Paleo recipes that are packed with nutrient-dense ingredients. Make sure you keep up with her on social media because I guarantee you’ll like what you see: FacebookTwitterInstagram and Pinterest. Take it away, Lexi!

Avocado BLT Egg Salad | Lexi's Clean Kitchen for stupideasypaleo.com I love egg salad. Also on the list of things that I love are: avocados, tomatoes, bacon, and scallions, to name a few. This is the absolute perfect lunch. For one, it combines all of those favorite things listed. And two, it is packed with protein and healthy fats to fill you up throughout the day, while being super simple to throw together! This recipe replaces the standard mayonnaise that is ordinarily in egg salad with avocado. It is perfectly creamy and full of flavor!

 

 

 

 

 

Prep Time 10 min – Cook Time 10 min – Total Time 20 min

Ingredients for Avocado BLT Egg Salad

  • 1 avocado
  • 6 hard-boiled eggs
  • 3/4 cup grape tomatoes, cut in halves
  • 4 strips bacon, cooked until crispy
  • 1/2 cup scallions, chopped
  • 2 teaspoon ground garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon Himalayan sea salt, more to taste

Directions for Avocado BLT Egg Salad

  1. Make your hard-boiled eggs. Once done, peel, set aside in the refrigerator and let cool.
  2. While they are cooking, make bacon using you desired method and cook until crispy.
  3. In a medium bowl combine eggs, avocado, garlic and salt; smash with a fork until combined.
  4. Add in bacon pieces, tomatoes and scallions. Mix well.
  5. Taste and add additional salt and ground garlic as desired.

Notes

Serve over fresh spinach or lettuce or in lettuce wraps!

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Avocado BLT Egg Salad | Lexi's Clean Kitchen for stupideasypaleo.com

Questions for Lexi? Leave them in the comments below.

Strawberry Chili Grilled Chicken by Beyoutifully Delicious

Strawberry Chili Grilled Chicken | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: Please welcome Candace from Beyoutifully Delicious to the blog again. A couple weeks ago, I featured her PeaNOT Pineapple Slaw, and it’s gotten rave reviews. Candace is all about good food with big flavor, and this recipe will not disappoint. Without further adieu, take it away Candace!

Last Easter I came up with a fresh strawberry dressing that gave a subtle sweetness to a spring green salad. For the protein to compliment the slaw, I updated it as a marinade with some heat. There’s nothing like salty, sweet AND spicy. Now we’re talking game-changer.

I love this marinade on mahi-mahi, it’s a flakey fish that has a really clean taste to it. None of that “fishy” business that tends to draw people away from ocean proteins. If seafood is not your thing, this is perfect for chicken too.

You can easily flavor swap blackberry or apricot for the strawberry as they work well with chili peppers. I would use fresh apricots rather than dried just because I want to keep my sugar in check. It’s very easy for that to get crazy if I’m not intentional about food preparation.

Ingredients for the Strawberry Chili Dressing / Marinade

This is enough for two (6 ounce or 340 grams) filets of mahi-mahi or chicken breasts.

  • 1-1/4 cups fresh strawberries
  • 3 tablespoons coconut vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon freeze-dried strawberries, crushed into a powder (sub: 1 Tbsp apple juice)
  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoon dried Thai chilis or 2 teaspoons chili paste
  • 1 clove garlic
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated ginger
  • Pinch of salt
  • Black pepper, to taste
  • 3 tablespoons melted coconut oil

Directions for the Strawberry Chili Dressing / Marinade

  1. In a blender, add all the ingredients except coconut oil and blend on high.
  2. Turn down the speed a little and slowly drizzle in coconut oil.
  3. Marinate the meat or fish for at least 2 hours and grill it until it’s no longer pink inside, about 4 minutes per side. Discard the leftover marinade. Or, bring the leftover marinade to a boil and cook it for 5 minutes to kill any bacteria.

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Strawberry Chili Grilled Chicken | stupideasypaleo.com

Questions? Leave them in the comment box below!

Ghee: What Is This Healthy Fat?

Ghee: What is This Healthy Fat? | stupideasypaleo.com

Ghee…what is this healthy fat that’s becoming so popular in the Paleo & real food world?

Essentially, ghee is a type of clarified butter that’s been cooked a bit longer to give it a nutty flavor. It’s got some fantastic properties that make it both healthy and good to cook with.

But first, let’s settle something: Ghee, derived from butter, is technically a dairy product. Yep. There it is. Dairy. Even if you’re a very strict Paleo-eater, don’t click away just yet. There are some reasons why ghee is a superior fat and one of the least problematic dairy products out there. Put simply, ghee is pure fat.

How is Ghee Made?

Ghee (rhymes with “me”) is made by heating butter slowly until all the water cooks off and the proteins coagulate in the bottom of the pan. The ghee is poured off and strained, solidifying once it has cooled. Ghee is cooked longer than traditional clarified butter which gives it a nutty, butterscotchy aroma. Basically, ghee smells like victory. If you’ve ever caught yourself just smelling the ghee jar for no reason, you’re not alone. Ahem.

It’s easy to find ghee is most large markets and health food stores, and if you’re feeling crafty, you can also make your own. When it comes to purchasing or making your own ghee, make sure the butter is from grass-fed, organic cows: If the butter is white or very pale yellow, it’s probably not high-quality. The fat produced from grass-fed cows is superior for a few reasons which are mentioned in the next section.

To see my favorite brand of ghee, click here.

But, Isn’t It Still Dairy?

Technically. But. BUT.

The reason why dairy is not part of a rigid Paleo template is because it can cause inflammation, sensitivities and intolerances. (Milk is a complex brew of proteins, carbohydrates and fat of which folks are generally sensitive to either the proteins or the carbohydrates, not the fat.)

Ghee is pure butter fat without the components that can make dairy problematic for many people. Note: If you’re really dairy sensitive, trace amounts of these proteins—such as casein—may remain and cause issues, but for most folks, it doesn’t.

Need more convincing? Even my friends over at Whole30 have made ghee the only Whole30-approved dairy product—and trust me, they’re known for their incredibly high standards.

So what’s so special about this delicious, golden butterfat? Cows that feed on grass produce butterfat with more conjugated linoleic acid (a fatty acid), vitamin K2, beta carotene (which is why it’s so vibrant yellow), vitamin A and a better Omega-3 fatty acid ratio than those fed on grain. Try to go with ghee made from grass-fed butter when you can.

And, butterfat is high in saturated fatty acids. In other words, it’s a healthy fat. Need to know more about saturated vs. unsaturated fats? Read here.

3 Reasons Why Ghee is a Star In My Kitchen

Besides the aforementioned, when it comes to cooking, ghee is my favorite fat to use in the kitchen for these reasons:

  • It has a really high smoke point: 485°F (252°C), far higher than coconut oil, olive oil, lard, butter, etc. This makes it ideal for high temperature cooking.
  • It’s incredibly shelf-stable. Ghee will last for months without refrigeration, though it’s recommended that you store it away from direct light and heat and only use clean, dry utensils to remove it from its jar. Keep it tightly covered when not in use.
  • It has a rich depth of flavor and adds a complexity to many foods that can’t be achieved with other oils or fats. Plus, I know a lot of folks don’t like the taste of coconut oil so ghee is a great alternative.

Wondering what you can make with ghee? Try this silky, delicious Ghee Hollandaise, this decadent Cinnamon French Toast Panna Cotta or this wonderfully colorful Ratatouille.

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Ghee: What is This Healthy Fat? | stupideasypaleo.com

Have you ever tried ghee? What do you think?

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: Give a hearty welcome to my guest blogger, Cassy from Fed & Fit. Cassy is a quadruple threat: She has mad kitchen skills, is an ace behind the camera, gets her sweat on at CrossFit and is one of the nicest folks you’ll ever meet. On her blog Fed & Fit, Cassy brings approachable yet flavor-packed recipes with her signature step-wise photography that always leaves me drooling on my keyboard. I’m super excited to introduce you to her today! Make sure to make these Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers and go follow her on social media…you won’t be disappointed. Take it away, Cassy!

Oh my word…I’m on Stupid Easy Paleo! I just adore Steph, and you know what? I adore you, too. I adore you because you’re here, you’re a part of the Real Food movement, and you probably have a thing for crispy chicken fingers. All reasons we can be great friends.

Crispy buffalo chicken fingers and I go way back. Once upon a time, I was a student at Texas A&M University in College Station, TX and I LIVED off of buffalo chicken fingers from a lovely little dining establishment called Wings ‘n More. While my health was rapidly declining, I was rapidly falling in love with comfort foods. Since going Paleo about 4 years ago, I gave up those delicious little strips of perfectly spicy, salty, gooey, but still miraculously crunchy chicken wonders. I gave them up plus the fries and ranch dressing that went with them.

Like a message was sent to me from above, I woke up one morning with the conviction a Paleo version MUST exist in this world. It needs to happen for you, for me, and for all those 20-something college students who think the gluten-coated, MSG-dusted, filler-fed restaurant chicken is their only option.

This Paleo-friendly crispy buffalo chicken finger is made possible by my good friend, the pork rind. Sometimes called chicharrones, sometimes called cracklin’s, pork skins are a crunchy, light, fluffy chip made by frying pork skin in it’s own rendered fat. They make for an occasional crunchy treat or can substitute as breading!

In an effort to create that reminiscent thick buffalo breading, I crafted a hybrid between my famous Paleo buffalo sauce and an egg wash.

Keep scrolling for my step-by-step photo instructions, tips and tricks.

I also recommend you check out my Paleo-friendly ranch dressing! Crispy buffalo chicken fingers and ranch dressing are a match made in heaven. Just saying.

Our recipe starts with about one pound of (ideally, pastured) chicken strips.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Next up, the buffalo egg wash! Crack two eggs into a bowl.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Now add 2 Tablespoons of apple cider vinegar.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Then the juice of one lemon.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Now add 2 teaspoons of garlic powder.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

2 teaspoons of onion powder.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

And then 2 teaspoons of paprika.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Now you get to choose your level of spice! For HOT add 2 teaspoons of cayenne pepper, add 1 teaspoon for medium, or add ½ teaspoon for mild. I opted for medium.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Lastly, add 1 teaspoon of kosher salt or sea salt.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Got all your ingredients loaded up?

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Whisk until well combined and set aside while we focus on our crunchy breading.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

The most important thing to remember when you’re buying pork skins is to read the label. You want to make sure the ingredients only read, “pork and salt.” Avoid bags with anything else listed.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Measure out about 5 cups of pork skins into a gallon-sized plastic bag.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Smash ‘em up! You’re also welcome to pulse the pork rinds in a food processor for a few minutes but A) I like to avoid washing more dishes than necessary and B) think smashing things is fun and therapeutic.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Once they’re mostly broken up, pour them in a bowl.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Make sure your oven is set to 400°F (200°C) and grab all your components!

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Dip each chicken strip in the buffalo sauce.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Make sure it’s well coated.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Then lay it in the breading.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Pull it out when the crunchy pork goodness has it all covered up.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Lay the strips on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Pop them in the oven for about 25 minutes or until cooked through.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Ta-da!

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

I recommend you plate with some crunchy vegetables and a side of Paleo-friendly ranch dressing.

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Enjoy!

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers

Serves 4-6

Prep Time: 10 minutes; Bake Time: 25 minutes

Ingredients for Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers:

Directions for Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C).
  2. Whisk the eggs, vinegar, lemon juice, garlic, onion, paprika, cayenne and salt together in a medium bowl.
  3. Dip each chicken strip into the buffalo egg wash then lay in the pork rind breading, coating both sides.
  4. Place breaded strips on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Bake for approximately 25 minutes or until cooked through.

Follow Cassy on social media: Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and Twitter

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Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers—Fed & Fit | stupideasypaleo.com

Questions for Cassy? Leave them in the comments below.