Category Archives: Whole30

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com This recipe for Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast is easy enough to do on a weeknight, but special enough for a special holiday table.

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com

Traditionally, pork loin is stuffed with bread stuffing, but I’ve kept this Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast super flavorful with a mixture of dried tart cherries, sweet dried apricots, tender walnuts, and earthy sage. With a basic technique, you’ll butterfly the pork loin to flatten the meat and make it perfect for stuffing and rolling. Pounding the meat so it’s uniformly flat after you’ve cut it will make rolling the meat easier.

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com

Since pork loin is a very lean cut of meat, I recommend cooking it with the fat side up to help keep it moist. You could even serve it with a simple Paleo herb gravy (like this one from Nom Nom Paleo) for extra credit points. Remember to ask your butcher for some twine when you buy your roast—most will be happy to give you a small amount on the house.

When I got my four pound roast home, I discovered it was actually two smaller pieces tied together by the butcher (oops!). I just rolled with it and did two roasts that were smaller.

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com

Here’s how to make your Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast…

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

Serves: Serves 8
 

Ingredients
  • 4 lb (1814 g) pork loin roast
  • 1 c (100 g) chopped walnuts
  • ½ c (100 g) dried apricots*, chopped
  • ½ c (75 g) tart dried cherries*
  • 15 fresh sage leaves, roughly chopped
  • 2 tsp (14 g) fine sea salt
  • 1 tsp (5 g) ground black pepper

Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 375F (191C). Line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper.
  2. Prepare the pork loin roast by butterflying or cutting it in a roll fashion. Here’s how to cut it in a roll so the meat looks beautiful and spiraled when you cut into it. You may want to pound the meat so it’s uniformly flat. Set it aside and prepare the filling.
  3. In a small bowl, mix the walnuts, dried apricots, dried cherries and sage.
  4. With the meat lying open, sprinkle about half the salt and pepper on the inside. Now, place the filling on the meat in one layer. You’ll want to stay away from the edges so the filling won’t fall out when you roll it.
  5. Starting with the thinnest end toward you, roll the meat up carefully. Place the rolled edge down and the fat up. Wrap butcher’s twine around the roast every few inches so it doesn’t open up during roasting.
  6. Roast the pork for approximately 40-50 minutes or until a thermometer inserted into the meat reads 145F (63C). Allow the roast to cool for about 10 minutes, then slice it into rounds with a sharp knife.

Notes
*Look for dried fruit that in unsweetened when possible.

 

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com

What’s your favorite meat for your holiday table? Tell me in the comments below!

Paleo or Whole30: Which Is Better?

Paleo or Whole30: Which is better?

It’s a question I get a lot. I’m answering it for you today so that you can go forward with confidence and select the best nutrition approach for yourself—especially if you’re planning to kick off the New Year with a renewed focus to eat better.

A Bit About Paleo First

Paleo is a way of eating focusing on real, whole, minimally processed foods. Foods that support gut health, hormonal balance, stable energy, and lean body mass. The stars of the show are meat, seafood, and eggs; veggies and fruit; and healthy fats. Most people start with a yes and no list of foods to eat and avoid, respectively.

Yes: Meat, seafood, and eggs; veggies and fruit; and healthy fats.

No: Grains, legumes, dairy, added sugars, processed foods, and salt. (There are others.)

Five years ago when I first started eating this way (on January 10, 2010 to be exact), the list of what was and wasn’t Paleo was pretty fixed across the board. It was easy to find a lot of consistency from book to book or website to website.

My, my…how things have changed.

Now it’s anyone’s guess, especially when every nutrient-poor baked good under the sun and processed / packaged food is now labeled with the “P” word because it’s “technically” Paleo. It’s kind of a mess, especially for newbies.

One site says white potatoes are okay. Another says to avoid them like the plague. One book says never, ever salt your food. The world replies back with, “But some salt makes food taste good.” Confusing, right?

While a yes / no list is a decent way to start your Paleo lifestyle and wrap your brain around it, it’s no way to live the rest of your life.

And, it’s not the smartest idea either. Why? Here’s an example.

Athletes need more carbohydrate than sedentary folks. By adhering to extremely low carbohydrate Paleo approaches and training extremely hard, many athletes have gotten into hot water with their cortisol levels, thyroid health, and poor performance (to name a few). Applying one Paleo protocol across the board where everyone eats the same exact thing—with disregard for life context, goals, health history, etc.—can have negative implications over time.

Another example. My husband’s been Paleo since 2007, but in the last couple years, he’s battled skin irritation like eczema around his eyes and elbows. Trial and error seemed to link it to certain foods like beef and eggs, but after much research, he narrowed it to a histamine intolerance. Eating a lot of fermented veggies, kombucha, leftover meat, bone broth and even certain vegetables—all foods widely lauded and encouraged in a Paleo diet—actually made his symptoms worse.

Long story short, you are an individual and context matters, which is why you need to learn about yourself and your relationship with food. That’s where Whole30 comes in.

Get Your Learn On With Whole30

[Note: I am an Envoy Extraordinaire for Whole30, which means I help educate the community and answer questions about the program.]

Whole30 is a month long elimination plan that’s been described more than once as “squeaky clean Paleo.” Dallas and Melissa Hartwig created this strategy to help people learn about their relationships with potentially problematic foods, then develop a plan for which foods to avoid long-term and which to reintroduce.

You see, we don’t all react to foods in the same ways. Me? I had a really tough time with sugar. Even after 18 months of Paleo eating, I couldn’t shake it. It consumed me. I wanted to stop eating sweets and craving junk food, but I was stuck. Even notoriously “healthy” foods like dried fruit were irresistible to me. I could slam back a whole bag of Trader Joe’s dried mango in about 10 minutes, then go back for more.

In 2011, I did my first Whole30 which required me to cut out all added sugar. (And, I avoided dried fruit because I knew it was a trigger food.) By the end, I had broken the cycle. Something I struggled with my WHOLE LIFE no longer had a grip on me.

Was I allergic to sugar? No. Do I have a sugar sensitivity? Maybe, but it depends on how you define that. Did I have a bad psychological relationship with it? Eff yeah, I did. What you learn about yourself during and after a Whole30 might surprise you.

So, completing a Whole30 will give you valuable, personalized feedback about which foods affect you positively / negatively, then allow you to make informed modifications to a Paleo approach for life. Sounds cool, right? You get to drive your boat based on how foods make you feel, not because of what some yes / no list you read five years ago told you to eat.

To Summarize…

Paleo or Whole30: Which is better? The answer is neither. They’re just different. They both serve their own purposes and have distinct goals.

The simple solution: Do a Whole30 at the start of your Paleo journey so you know how to better eat Paleo for life.

Paleo is a long-term nutrition and lifestyle strategy where nutrient-dense foods are encouraged, but inflammatory, nutrient-poor foods are avoided.

Whole30 is a short-term, very strict program designed to help you learn about which foods may be problematic for you. You can then apply what you learn to a slightly looser, less strict (but very much informed) Paleo approach to eating for life.

Whole30 Resources To Help You Plan for January 1

1: Get a copy of It Starts with Food. It’s really easy to read, and it’ll set clear guidelines for you. (Plus it has a ton of tasty recipes from Mel Joulwan of Well Fed and Well Fed 2.) No time or dinero to get one? You can read about the program on the Whole30 website here. Not sure if you should get the book? Check out my review here: 5 Reasons to Read It Starts with Food.

2: I’ve tagged every recipe from the blog that’s Whole30-friendly (over 100 to date) for easy searching in the Recipe Index. If it says W30, it’s made from Whole30-friendly ingredients. There are hundreds!

3: My Whole30 Pinterest board. Love to pin? You can find all my Whole30 recipe pins (plus other photos and videos) by clicking here: Stupid Easy Paleo Whole30 Pinterest Board.

4: My Whole30 video tips! You can find them on the Stupid Easy Paleo YouTube channel or by clicking the blog posts here: 5 Tips for a Successful Whole30 and 5 More Tips for a Successful Whole30.

5: Other awesome bloggers who’ve written about Whole30: Nom Nom Paleo and The Clothes Make the Girl just to name a couple rockstars! Click on their blog names for kickass Whole30 posts, including recipes. Mel’s got another newly updated post here: 30 Reasons to Whole30 with lots of good stuff AND her Week 1 Meal Plan with yummies like her famous Chocolate Chili and Sunshine Sauce!

6: My Stupid Easy Paleo Guide to Clean-Eating Challenges (It’s free!)

7: The Whole30 forum. A free forum dedicated to all topics Whole30-related. Click here to join.

Still got questions about Paleo or Whole30? Leave them in the comments below, and I’ll get back to you!

Paleo or Whole30: Which is Better? | stupideasypaleo.com

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak: Performance Paleo Cookbook

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak: Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak is the first recipe preview I’m sharing with you from my soon-to-be-released cookbook, The Performance Paleo Cookbook

With less than one month before it comes out on January 6, 2015, I’ve gotten the go-ahead to start posting a few exclusive recipes here on the site to get your taste buds working! I’m starting off with a bang with this uber-tasty and flavor party of a dish, Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak.

I am so, SO excited to be nearly to release day. You’ve supported me through the better part of a year on this cookbook journey, and I know you’ll love the food. Remember to pre-order for the best savings!

From The Performance Paleo Cookbook

Tender-Asian Marinated Flank Steak

Flank steak is a really special piece of meat and when prepared well, its melt-in-your-mouth tender. Because it can be somewhat tough, there are some tricks I use to make it more delicate, like marinating it for several hours to break down the tough fibers, cooking it at really high heat to sear it and lock in the juices and slicing it against the grain. Set it up to go the night before or in the morning before you leave for work, and all youll have to do is cook it when you get home! Serve it on top of a tossed green salad with some avocado for a nourishing, complete meal.

Serves 2

Ingredients for Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak from The Performance Paleo Cookbook

  • 1 lb (454 g) flank steak
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed
  • 1” (2.5 cm) piece ginger, peeled and sliced into thin coins
  • 3 green onions (2 oz [57 g]), white and light green parts, roughly chopped
  • ¼ cup (59 mL) coconut aminos
  • 2 tbsp (30 mL) lime juice
  • 2 tsp (10 mL) dark sesame oil
  • 1 tsp fish sauce
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) coconut oil

Directions for Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak from The Performance Paleo Cookbook

Combine all the ingredients except for the coconut oil in a plastic zip-top bag or a medium bowl. Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours. Longer is definitely better, up to 24 hours. Remove the meat and pat it dry. Discard the marinade.

Heat a skillet to medium-high heat and add the coconut oil. When it shimmers, add the steak, and sear for 3 minutes until a golden brown crust has formed. Flip the steak and sear the other side for 3 minutes. Then turn the heat down to medium-low and cook until it’s to your preference, about 4 more minutes for medium.

Let rest on a cutting board for at least 5 minutes before slicing. Cut into thin strips, against the grain (muscle fibers). It’ll be really tender that way.

Try This: Instead of pan-searing the steak, grill it.

TOTAL RECIPE MACRONUTRIENTS (IN GRAMS PER SERVING)

PROTEIN 45G

FAT 36G

TOTAL CARB 12G

NET CARB 11G

Pre-order now through through AmazonBarnes & NobleiTunesGoogle Play or IndieBound!

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak: Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata is one of my favorite post-workout foods because it’s 1) packed with protein and 2) totally portable. In fact, it’s totally representative of the tasty post-workout bites in my upcoming cookbook, The Performance Paleo Cookbook! (It comes out in just a little over a month, and it’s still on pre-order for 25 off!)

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

My pal Jesse from Whitford Foundry came down to the house today to film a video teaser for the cookbook, and I needed to whip something up as my “prep at home, take to the gym” dish. This fit the bill perfectly.

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

Normally, I like to keep post-workout food pretty low in fat—which slows digestion—but eggs are a great tradeoff for busy folks. The lean chicken bumps up the protein content, and I added sweet potato for a good carb boost.

Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients for Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata

  • 9 large eggs, beaten
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) coconut oil or ghee
  • 1 large roasted sweet potato, cooled and roughly chopped*
  • 12 oz (340 g) lean ground chicken
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1 small head broccoli, stem removed, chopped small

Directions for Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F (177°C).
  2. In a large bowl, beat the eggs together with the smoked paprika, salt and pepper. Mix in the chopped sweet potato. Set aside.
  3. In a large cast iron skillet over medium-high heat, add the coconut oil. Then, sauté the chicken until it’s cooked through, about 4 minutes. Remove to a separate bowl.
  4. In the same skillet, add the onion and broccoli and sauté on medium heat until they are softened and slightly tender, about 6 to 8 minutes. Now, add the cooked chicken back to the pan.
  5. Pour the egg mixture into the skillet. Turn off the heat and stir the ingredients to combine.
  6. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until the eggs are set and not runny.
  7. Serve directly from the skillet or slice and store for leftovers.

*My weekly big food prep involves roasting half a dozen sweet potatoes. I line a baking sheet with foil, place the washed and unpeeled sweet potatoes on it, and get that into a 400°F (204°C) oven for about 45 minutes. I cool them, then store them in the fridge. When it’s time to use them, I just peel them! (The peels loosen right up after they cool.)

Remember to check out my cookbook! It comes out on January 6th!

Click here to pin this!

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

How To Brine a Turkey or Chicken

How To Brine a Turkey or Chicken | stupideasypaleo.com

How to brine a turkey or chicken? I’m covering this simple method in today’s post and giving you my favorite go-to brine ingredients for succulent poultry every time.

I first started brining my chicken back when I got my hands on Mel Joulwan’s ahhhhmazing book Well Fed. Since then, I’ve created lots of different brines, mostly for lean chicken (think white meat) and pork. Letting the meat soak in brine, a salted water sometimes infused with herbs and spices, is sort of like a marinade.

How To Brine a Turkey or Chicken | stupideasypaleo.com

Instead of just imparting flavor though, the brine keeps the meat moist and juicy which is always a challenge with leaner cuts. How does it work? Basically the salt causes the muscle protein to soften and get less tough when cooked. More moisture is retained during the cooking process.

If a little brining time is good, more must be better…right? Actually no. Oversoaking the meat will eventually cause moisture to be drawn out of the meat. The following method works for any lean meat—chicken, turkey, and shellfish like shrimp are great—and you can scale up or down depending on the quantity of protein you’re dealing with.

How To Brine a Turkey or Chicken

  1. Prepare a container to hold the poultry. A stock pot will hold a smaller turkey while a very large bird will have to go in a clean, new bucket or other container lined with food-safe plastic.
  2. Remove any giblets and pat the bird dry with paper towel.
  3. Add the salt and spices to the container, then the appropriate amount of water. Stir well to dissolve the salt. (Recipe is below.)
  4. Carefully add the turkey or chicken to the brine. Place the container in the refrigerator for the correct amount of time. You can’t leave this on the counter.
  5. When the brining process is complete, remove the poultry and rinse off the excess salt and spices. Discard the brine. Pat the poultry dry with paper towels, then proceed with your preferred cooking method.

How To Brine a Turkey or Chicken | stupideasypaleo.com

Basic Brine Recipe for Turkey (for a 10-pound bird)

Follow the directions above, allowing the turkey to brine for about 10 to 12 hours. Tip: Mix your brine ingredients (except the water) in a Mason jar ahead of time and store for when you’re busy. Mark on the lid how much you’ve made…enough for a 5-pound or 10-pound bird, for example.

*For a 5-pound whole chicken, halve the quantities. Brine for 5 hours.

**For a 20-pound turkey, double the quantities. Brine for about 24 hours.

Have a question? Leave it in the comments below, and I’ll get back to you!

Click here to pin this!

How To Brine a Turkey or Chicken | stupideasypaleo.com

Thanksgiving Leftovers Ideas

Thanksgiving Leftovers Ideas | stupideasypaleo.com

Thanksgiving leftovers: Love them or hate them, they seem to be an inevitability…unless your guests are much hungrier than you planned on!

You’ve gathered with family. Eaten enough to warrant loosening your zipper (or maybe you just wore sweatpants…you smarty, you). Watched plenty of football. But now you’re stuck with a fridge full of half-eatens. Here are a few ideas to inspire you to whip yesterday’s dinner into today’s goodies.

Thanksgiving Leftovers Idea #1: Use the turkey carcass / bones to make bone broth.

Bone broth—or stock as it’s sometimes called—is a really great way to use up your leftover turkey bits. Not only does it taste great, it’s also rich in gelatin / collagen which is great for gut health and maintaining your skin, joints and hair. Rad, right?

Now, to make a good-sized batch of bone broth, you’ll probably need more than one turkey carcass, but the leftover bird will get you most of the way to a full pot of stock. To ensure you have enough cartilaginous bones to get really jiggly broth, consider adding in extra chicken backs, feet or even beef knuckle bones.

For a fantastic tutorial on making your own perfect bone broth, click on this guest post from the broth guy Ryan at Bare Bones Broth.

Thanksgiving Leftovers Idea #2: Make a leftovers mashup.

Last year, I made a Paleo Thanksgiving Leftovers “Sandwich” with cranberry sauce, turkey, shaved Brussels sprouts and sweet potato “pancakes” as the “bread.” Needless to say, the idea (which I borrowed from Food52 and made Paleo) was a hit, even making it to BuzzFeed. Guess that means folks liked it!

Thanksgiving Leftovers Ideas | stupideasypaleo.com

Use this idea as a jumping off point for your own reinvention or click here to get the individual recipes for the Paleo Thanksgiving Leftovers “Sandwich” as I posted them last year.

Thanksgiving Leftovers Idea #3: Make a curry.

Probably the hardest part of Thanksgiving leftovers to deal with is the turkey: Unless you drown it in gravy, it just gets so dry. One of my solutions: Make a curry with it.

My recipe for Leftover Turkey Yellow Curry gives you the best of both worlds, combining the win of using up leftovers with the seemingly impossible feat of bringing dry turkey back to life. This mild yellow curry is great served over some cauliflower rice and really changes up the flavors from everyday to exotic.

I’m sure you have your favorite way to use up Thanksgiving leftovers, so be sure to share it in the comments below!

Click here to pin this!

Thanksgiving Leftovers Ideas | stupideasypaleo.com

Tuesday Night Chicken

Tuesday Night Chicken—The Frugal Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: This recipe comes to you courtesy of my personal friend and fellow Paleo blogger / author, Ciarra Hannah of Popular Paleo. Her new cookbook, The Frugal Paleo Cookbook—all about eating delicious, flavorful Paleo food without breaking the bank—comes out on December 2, 2014!

She’s giving you a sneak peek with this tasty recipe for Tuesday Night Chicken. If you’re down for saving money while eating Paleo, you need this book. Plus, if you pre-order before December 2, you’ll get a free bonus package chock full of awesome info and coupons. Take it away Ciarra!

Truthfully this could be named after any day of the week. It’s so approachable and affordable that you won’t hesitate to make it after a long day at work or just before payday hits. This recipe highlights my favorite way to cook a rich tomato sauce quickly: red chili flakes and cinnamon. It’s how my Italian grandmother fed our family, so naturally I consider it the right way, as any true Italian would. Enjoy using these straightforward ingredients to create a bold and flavorful classic Italian dinner…any night of the week.

Serves 2 to 4

Ingredients for Tuesday Night Chicken

  • 2 large skinless, boneless chicken breasts (about 1 pound [454 g])
  • 1 tsp (5 g) House Seasoning Blend (see below)
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup (150 g) diced white or yellow onion
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 batch Italian Seasoning Blend (see below)
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 (14.5 oz [411 g]) can fire-roasted tomatoes
  • Fresh basil and/or flat-leaf parsley for garnish

For the House Seasoning Blend

For the Italian Seasoning Blend

Directions for Tuesday Night Chicken

Prepare the chicken breasts first by filleting lengthwise to make 2 thick breasts into 4 thinner ones. Dust both sides with the House Seasoning Blend.

Heat a high-sided skillet over medium-high heat and add a little bit of olive oil to the pan—enough to just coat the bottom. When the oil is hot, lay the seasoned chicken breasts in to sear. Work in batches to avoid overcrowding the pan as overcrowding leads to steaming, not browning. When the chicken has been seared (note, not fully cooked) on both sides, transfer it to a plate and set aside.

Reduce the temperature to medium and replenish the pan with a little more olive oil if it looks dry. Add the onion, garlic, Italian Seasoning Blend, kosher salt and cinnamon and cook, stirring often. If you are not accustomed to building sauces this way, I know it may appear a bit strange, but trust me on this. Applying heat and oil to the dried herbs prior to immersing in liquid revives the oils and creates a deeper flavor. It’s the trick to crafting a rich tomato sauce in such a short amount of time.

Cook until the onion is translucent and the garlic and herbs fragrant. Pour in the fire-roasted tomatoes and mix together. When the sauce bubbles, add the par-cooked chicken back to the pan, nestle it into the spiced-tomato-goodness, cover and reduce the temperature to a simmer.

Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes while chopping the fresh garnishes—use either or both basil or flat-leaf parsley. This final simmer also allows plenty of time to whip up a quick vegetable side like an easy salad, sautéed dark leafy greens or Pan-Roasted Cauliflower & Zucchini, which is available on page 157 of the book or here on www.PopularPaleo.com.

I like to serve this directly from the pan after scattering with the vibrant green fresh herbs.

Love this recipe? Pre-order The Frugal Paleo Cookbook here!

Click here to pin this!

Tuesday Night Chicken—The Frugal Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question about this recipe? Leave it in the comments below, and we’ll get back to you!

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash doubles as a hearty fall dinner or a great game day appetizer. It takes a little advance planning because the pork gets the low and slow treatment in the slow cooker, but the meat can be made a day ahead of time and reheated after the squash is roasted. Or, just make the meat itself! There are tons of options here. If you omit the honey, this recipe is Whole30-friendly and just as tasty.

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com

Delicata squash are cylindrical and generally smaller than a butternut. You’ll recognize them by their yellow skin with long green stripes. The skin is thin and edible, the flesh creamy and a bit sweet. You can even experiment with different types of squash if you can’t find delicata—acorn would work well—but instead of four, you’ll probably only need two. I slice the squash boats in halves or thirds for appetizer portions or keep them whole for dinner. Serve with a side salad or some roasted veggies for a complete meal.

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com

If you’re ever interested in checking out the pastured pork from 5280 Meat in Colorado, my readers get 10% off any order with the code SEPaleo.

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash
Prep time: 
Total time: 

 

Ingredients
  • 3 lb (1361 g) pork shoulder or pork butt
  • 2 tsp (10 g) fine sea salt
  • ¼ cup (60 mL) stone ground mustard, divided in half
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) raw honey (omit for Whole30)
  • ¼ tsp cayenne pepper
  • 4 small delicata squash, halved and seeded
  • 2 tbsp (15 mL) melted fat or oil of choice
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  • Chopped parsley, for garnish

Instructions
  1. You’ll make this recipe in two parts. First, make the pulled pork because it needs 8 hours in the slow cooker. Overnight works really well.
  2. Place the pork shoulder in the slow cooker, then rub all over with the salt and half the mustard (about 2 tablespoons / 30 mL). Cover and cook on low for 8 hours. Remove the meat, place in a bowl and shred with two forks. (The cooking liquid can get quite salty which is why I don’t shred it in the slow cooker itself.) Mix in the other half of the mustard, the honey and the cayenne pepper.
  3. About 45 minutes before you want to serve the food, get the squash roasting in the oven. This can be done ahead of time, too, and then everything can be reheated.
  4. Preheat the oven to 400F (204C). Line a baking sheet with parchment or foil. Arrange the squash halves on the sheet with the empty boat side facing up, and drizzle with the melted fat or oil. Sprinkle with some salt and pepper, then roast for about 30-40 minutes or until the squash is tender and starting to lightly brown.

Notes
If you’re doing Whole30, check labels on the mustard and omit the honey.

Nutrition Information
Serving size: Serves 4 to 6

Click here to pin this recipe for Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash!

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question? Leave it in the comments below.

5 Questions With My Paleo Shero—Mel Joulwan

5 Questions with Mel Joulwan | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: Every once in a while, I share interviews with some of the amazing people I’ve been lucky enough to get to know in this community. I am beyond excited to interview my friend Mel Joulwan, totally badass creator of the blog The Clothes Make the Girl and author of two amazing cookbooks: Well Fed and Well Fed 2. She’s cooked up some of the most well-loved Paleo / Whole30 recipes EVER (um, hello Chocolate Chili and Homemade Paleo Mayo) and completely lives the lifestyle. I’m a die-hard fan, and still hoping that one day, her, Nom Nom Paleo and I will dress up as Charlie’s Angels for Halloween. Please enjoy!

I know a lot about you Mel, but can you tell newbies about who you are and what you do?

I’m a book nerd who plays classical piano. Along the way to being a grown up,  I fell in love with punk rock music, leopard print, and cooking. I also played flat track roller derby. If you look me up on Amazon, you’ll find Rollergirl: Totally True Tales From The Track (my book about my Derby days), Living Paleo For Dummies, and my cookbooks Well Fed: Paleo Recipes For People Who Love To Eat and Well Fed 2: More Paleo Recipes For People Who Love To Eat. (You’re welcome to download free samples of our books: Well Fed and Well Fed 2.)

5 Questions with Mel Joulwan | stupideasypaleo.com

I have a blog called The Clothes Make The Girl where I write about my triumphs and failures in the gym, in the kitchen, and in life. I like to pretend I’m a badass so I workout at KDR Fitness  (where they have me lift heavy things over and over and over, sometimes quickly.) I also enjoy frequent soaks in epsom salts, walk 10,000 steps almost every day, and meditate. I’ve seen every episode of the original Law & Order at least three times (not an exaggeration), and my favorite book is Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (not to be confused with books by Jane Austen.)

5 Questions with Mel Joulwan | stupideasypaleo.com

If you were stuck on a desert island (with a fridge), what 3 foods would you choose to have around?

A jar of Sunbutter, so I’d always have a sweet treat. (Plus, it would taste great on the bananas I’m going to assume are growing on the beach of my island.)

A jar of Thai red curry paste so I could turn the fish I’d catch and the coconuts I’d find into a luscious curry.

A bottle of champagne because…screw it! I’m stuck on a desert island! I’m having a little bubbly once in a while.

(This is all a lie. If I was on a desert island, I would wish I had Doritos, Fritos, and Jackson’s Honest Potato Chips.)

What’s your best time saving tip for making cooking at home less painful?

I have two tricks, and they’re both based on the helpful fact that I actually really love leftovers. Honestly, I think I enjoy leftover food more than the original meal. I know that makes me a weirdo.

1. I always cook a bunch of protein and veggies in advance. I grill chicken and brown ground beef. I partially steam broccoli, cabbage, green beans, Brussels sprouts…and I put everything in BPA-free containers in the fridge. When it’s time to eat, I heat some ghee or duck fat (OMG! Duck fat!) in a skillet, then add garlic and onion. When it’s soft, I plunk in protein and veggies, add some spices, and sauté everything until it’s caramelized. If I’ve done the prep of the protein and veggies in advance, the “make dinner” part takes only about 15 minutes.

2. My best secret weapon is homemade mayo. It takes about 3 minutes to make, and it makes everything you blop it on taste better. Grilled meat. Canned tuna. Raw veggies. Just add some spices and acid (lemon juice or vinegar) to the mayo and you instantly have a creamy dipping sauce.

What’s new on the horizon for The Clothes Make the Girl?

You heard it here first: We’re working on a site redesign that will be more visual to better highlight my recipes and a new structure that should make it easier to find recipes in the archive. We’re super excited to see how it all comes together. It should be launched in early 2015. Whew!

And…I’m working on recipes for our next cookbook. The theme is still a secret, but I can tell everyone this: The recipes will be internationally-inspired favorites with lots of spices — I could never give up my spice drawer! — but there’s also a new twist that I think people will really like. That’s all I can say about it for now. It should be out in early 2016.

I hear you’ve got these cool curated boxes of your favorite Mel things happening now…what’s that all about?

Quarterly is a really fun company that recruits people — like Pharrell Williams, Andrew Zimmern, Nina Garcia, Timothy Ferriss… and me (!) — to curate boxes of goodies that are sent to subscribers a few times a year. The first box I put together was a Paleo starter kit. It went out to 650 subscribers in September, and it was really fun to see the reactions online as people unboxed their care packages. (You can see what was in box EAT01 right here.)

For EAT02, the theme is “Good Morning,” and I’m really excited about the cool stuff that’s going to be in the box. Morning can be a stressful time for people, so EAT02 will be filled with hand-picked items to make mornings a little sweeter. My husband Dave and I collaborate on a hand-drawn letter and recipe for each box. In EAT01, we included an illustrated letter — my handwriting, Dave’s drawings — and a recipe for Snuggle Soup that I developed exclusively for the Quarterly box. We have some really fun ideas for the letter we’ll include in EAT02.

My goal with my Quarterly box is to always give my subscribers delicious things to eat and useful things that are delightful in some way. It’s a care package from me to them. To subscribe, head right on over here: http://on.qrtr.ly/paleobox.

5 Questions with Mel Joulwan | stupideasypaleo.com

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5 Questions with Mel Joulwan | stupideasypaleo.com

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Butternut Squash Pasta Sauce—Paleo & Whole30

Butternut Squash "Pasta" Sauce—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

Sometimes, recipes are born out of necessity. My local market was sold out of a prepared butternut squash sauce, so I decided to make my own version. Of course, I had nothing to compared the taste to, but I’ll settle for “delicious” which is what I got.

Butternut Squash "Pasta" Sauce—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

This sauce uses butternut squash as the base, but adds in sautéed aromatics—similar to a classic mirepoix—to create a foundation of flavor. The red pepper gives it some body, and some tomato paste brings acidity without dominating and making it taste too tomato-y.

Butternut Squash "Pasta" Sauce—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

I served this over warmed zucchini noodles, but the possibilities are really endless!

Butternut Squash Pasta Sauce—Paleo & Whole30
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

 

Ingredients
  • 1 tbsp (15 g) ghee
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • ½ red pepper, seeded and diced
  • 1 stalk celery, diced
  • Pinch sea salt
  • 1 lb (454 g) butternut squash, peeled, halved, seeded and diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 3 tbsp (45 mL) tomato paste
  • ~3/4 cup (177 mL) water
  • Sea salt and pepper, to taste

Instructions
  1. First, get the aromatic veggie base going. In a large skillet over medium heat, warm the ghee. Add the onion, red pepper, celery and pinch of sea salt. Cook and stir until the veggies soften and lightly brown, about 8 minutes.
  2. Add the butternut squash cubes and garlic. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cover the skillet. Cook for another 10 minutes or so until the squash is tender. Stir a few times so nothing sticks. Turn off the heat and let the veggies cool for a few minutes.
  3. Then, add the veggies to a food processor or high speed blender with the tomato paste. Start with ½ cup (118 mL) water. Puree the veggies until they become a sauce. If it’s too thick, add water by the tablespoon. I found that ¾ cup (177 mL) water made a sauce that was somewhere between a thin soup and a thick puree. Of course, the moisture content of your veggies may vary so start with less and add more as you go.
  4. Season with sea salt and pepper to taste and warm in a small pot before serving.

Notes
Double the batch and freeze the extras for up to 1 month.

Nutrition Information
Serving size: Serves 3 to 4.

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Butternut Squash "Pasta" Sauce—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

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Paleo Slow Cooker Lamb Roast with Root Veggies

Paleo Slow Cooker Lamb Roast with Root Veggies

With fall weather starting to settle in, my mind naturally drifts to hearty roasts, soups, and stews. I’m a big fan of the slow cooker for this job, as the meal practically cooks itself once you’ve added the ingredients. Searing off the meat before you add it is an extra step that’s well worth the time because it helps to develop an extra layer of delicious flavor.

I got my lamb roast from 5280 Meat, a family-owned Colorado company that raises grass-fed, pastured animals. Normally, I’m not a fan of how lamb can be gamey, but this roast was mild and fall-apart tender. If you order from 5280 Meat, use the code “SEPaleo” when you check out and receive 10% off!

Paleo Slow Cooker Lamb Roast with Root Veggies
Prep time: 
Total time: 

Serves: Serves 3 to 4
 

Ingredients
  • 3 to 4 lb (1361 to 1814 g) boneless lamb leg roast
  • Couple generous pinches each sea salt and pepper
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) ghee
  • ½ cup (118 mL) chicken broth
  • 6 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 to 3 sprigs rosemary, chopped
  • 2 to 3 sprigs thyme, stripped off stalk
  • ⅓ cup (77 mL) stone ground mustard
  • 2 carrots, peeled and chopped
  • 2 parsnips, peeled and chopped
  • 2 Yukon gold potatoes, peeled and chopped*
  • 1 small rutabaga, peeled and chopped
  • ½ tsp (2.5 g) sea salt
  • ¼ tsp (1 g) black pepper

Instructions
  1. First, you’re going to sear the lamb roast to develop a nice golden crust. That’s where the flavor really shines. To do that, dry the lamb very well with paper towel and season with a couple generous pinches of salt and pepper. Heat a cast iron skillet over high heat, then add the ghee. You want the pan smoking hot. If not, the meat will steam instead of sear. Try for 3 to 4 minutes a side until you get most of the roast seared. Remove the meat from the pan (I put it on a plate), then reduce the heat to medium, and add the chicken broth, scraping up the brown bits from the bottom of the pan.
  2. Place the roast in the slow cooker.
  3. In a small bowl, mix the garlic, rosemary, thyme and mustard. Pour it on top of the lamb and use your hands to coat the meat with the mixture.
  4. Toss the chopped root veggies (carrots, parsnips, potato and rutabaga) with salt and pepper, and arrange them around the meat. Pour the chicken broth from when you deglazed the pan on top of the veggies.
  5. Cook on low for 8 to 10 hours.
  6. Serve with a green salad or veggie of your choice for a complete meal.

Notes
*substitute with sweet potatoes if you do not eat white potatoes

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Paleo Slow Cooker Lamb Roast with Root Veggies

What’s your favorite fall slow cooker recipe?

Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice

Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice | stupideasypaleo.com

Making your own Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice means you’ll never run out again. I love shaking some into a homemade pumpkin spice latte…perfect way to celebrate fall!

5 from 1 reviews

Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice
Prep time: 
Total time: 

Serves: ¼ cup (22 g)
 

Ingredients

Instructions
  1. Combine the ingredients in a small container (I like jelly jars like these) and cover.

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Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice | stupideasypaleo.com

What’s your favorite way to use pumpkin pie spice?

Pork Chile Verde—Paleo & Whole30

Pork Chili Verde—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com Pork Chile Verde is a classic, flavorful recipe that’s Paleo and Whole30-friendly. Instead of the usual jalapeño peppers, I used some Hatch chiles. They’re in season right now at the end of August, and their mild heat really rounds out the base of flavors from the onion, garlic and tomatillos. If you can’t find fresh Hatch chiles, you can often find them canned in the ethnic foods section of the market.

Probably my favorite thing about this Pork Chile Verde recipe is that it’s affordable. Pork shoulder is inexpensive, but the meat can be tough, so simmering it for a couple hours makes it melt-in-your-mouth tender. If you have leftovers, try reheating the meat and sauce, then dropping a couple eggs into the pan and putting a lid on it until the eggs are poached through. It’s a fantastic breakfast, and so delicious. Serve with some cauliflower rice and my Simple Paleo Tortillas for a complete meal.

5 from 1 reviews

Pork Chile Verde—Paleo & Whole30
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

Serves: 2 to 3 servings
 

Ingredients
  • 2 to 2-1/2 lb (907 to 1134 g) pork shoulder, pork butt or Boston butt
  • 1 tsp (5 g) sea salt
  • 1 tsp (2 g) ground cumin
  • 1 tsp (2 g) ground coriander
  • ½ tsp (1 g) black pepper
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) ghee
  • ½ large onion, diced
  • 3 Hatch green chiles* (6 oz / 171 g), seeded and diced
  • ¾ lb (340 g) tomatillos, husk removed and diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 c (473 mL) chicken broth
  • Large handful of fresh cilantro for garnish
  • *If you can’t find fresh Hatch green chiles (available in late summer), you can use canned Hatch green chiles (two 4 oz / 113 g cans)

Instructions
  1. Trim the fat off the pork, and cut it into 1 inch (2.5 centimeter) chunks. Put the pork in a medium bowl, and toss it with the salt, cumin, coriander, and pepper.
  2. Heat a large, deep-sided skillet over medium-high, and melt the ghee. Add the pork and brown each side for about 2 minutes. You’re just trying to develop some color, not cook it all the way through. Remove the pork to a clean bowl while you cook the veggies.
  3. Reduce the heat to medium, then add the onion, tomatillos, and chiles. Cook and stir for 5 to 7 minutes until the onions soften and turn translucent. Then, add the garlic and chicken broth, and put the pork back in the skillet. Stir to combine.
  4. Bring this mixture to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Cover and simmer for 1 hour. Remove the lid and simmer for 1 more hour, until the sauce has reduced a bit and the pork is very tender.

Change It Up

  • Double the recipe, and freeze the leftovers.
  • I haven’t tried this recipe in the slow cooker yet, but I suspect it would come out well if cooked on low for about 5 hours. I’d still brown the meat and onion / peppers before throwing everything in the slow cookers.

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Pork Chili Verde—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

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Beet Ginger Sauerkraut

Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com

Beet Ginger Sauerkraut has long been on my agenda to make, especially after I picked up a bag from Farmhouse Cultures. It was so delicious, and while buying it pre-made is convenient, it’s far more affordable to make it myself. The beets add a bit of sweetness—plus, the color is fantastic—and the ginger is so flavorful and provides a little bite.

I have a few sauerkraut / fermentation posts on this site already, and this isn’t really any different from those. If you’re a newbie to making sauerkraut, take a deep breath (it’s going to be okay!), and read through the whole post before you start the process. It’s actually very, very simple but there are a couple key points to remember:

  • This method uses lacto-fermentation with only salt and whatever Lactobacillus bacteria are kickin’ around your kitchen environment. There is no whey in this method.
  • The veggies must stay submerged under the brine (in an anaerobic environment) the *whole* time you’re fermenting them…and even after they’re done. If not, they’ll mold quickly.
  • Clean all your glassware, utensils and hands well before you start. For extra insurance against contamination, rinse everything with white vinegar.
  • You don’t have to use a fancy fermentation cap like this, but they make the process a bit easier, and there’s less chance of contamination. I used the Kraut Source prototype for this batch, and I’m super impressed at how simple it was. It was especially good at keeping the veggies submerged. They are about to finish their Kickstarter, so get in on it while you can!
  • I’ve included a troubleshooting section at the end of this post, so if you’re seeing odd things during fermentation, check there to see if it’s normal or you should toss your ferment.

Prep time: 30 min     Ferment time:  7–14 days     Makes: 1-quart (946 mL) jar

Ingredients for Beet Ginger Sauerkraut

  • 2 lb (907 g) green cabbage (you’ll use half unless making a double batch)
  • 8 oz (227 g) red beets
  • 2–3 oz (57–85 g) fresh ginger
  • 1-1/2 tbsp (22 g) coarse sea salt (I like this one)
  • If you need extra brine, use 1 tsp (5 g) salt in 1 cup (237 mL) water

Directions for Beet Ginger Sauerkraut

The basic method for making sauerkraut goes like this:

Thinly slice the vegetables, then salt them. Pulverize the veggies by crushing them with your hands to release the juices. Pack them tightly into a jar, submerging the veggies underneath the brine. Cover with something—like fabric—so dust and bugs stay out, but air can still escape. (Gas is generated as part of the fermentation process, so don’t cover it with an airtight lid unless it’s one specifically made for fermenting or you run the risk of the jar exploding due to pressure.) Let it sit in a dark cabinet for at least a week—or longer, depending on how sour you like it—then refrigerate.

For this batch:

  1. Cut the cabbage in half. You’ll only be using half for this recipe, unless you decide to double it. (In that case, you’ll need to double the amount of beets, ginger, and sea salt, and you’ll need another jar set-up.) Very thinly slice the cabbage. I used a mandolin, but I’ve done it plenty of times with a sharp knife. Toss the cabbage into a very large bowl. Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com
  2. To prepare the beets, I scrubbed but didn’t peel them. If you’d like, you can peel them, but it’s just an extra step. I thinly sliced the beets into rounds using a mandolin, then stacked them up, and sliced them into matchsticks. Alternatively, you could shred them in a food processor or with a box grater (but that is SUPER messy because beet juice stains). Place the beets into the bowl with the cabbage.
  3. For the ginger, I grated it down finely using a microplane grater. You could also mince it by hand, just be sure the pieces are very small since biting into chunks of ginger is very spicy. Place the grated ginger in the bowl with the beets and cabbage. Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com
  4. Now, add the salt. With clean hands, start to scrunch the veggies as you mix everything together. You have to get aggressive here because you’re trying to break down the cells in the veggies and (with the help of the salt) draw out the moisture. This takes at least 5 minutes of scrunching and squeezing. (Yay for kitchen fitness!) If there’s not a lot of moisture after that time, add more by making some brine (salt water) with 1 teaspoon salt in 1 cup of water. Some cabbages are just drier than others. C’est la vie! Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com
  5. Pack the veggies into a wide-mouth quart-sized Mason jar. Really push them down. (I use my fist or a spoon.) The veggies should come up to about the shoulder of the jar. If there is not at least an inch of liquid covering the veggies, add some brine to cover. Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com Now, you have a couple options: use a special lid for fermenting to cap it all off or use a simple DIY cover. For this batch, I used a new prototype lid from Kraut Source. It uses a spring mechanism to hold the veggies down under the brine. However, if you don’t have that, the other method I’ve used successfully is to place a 4-ounce jelly jar INTO the wide-mouth jar to keep the veggies submerged. It works really, really well. Click here to see pictures and video. Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com
  6. Place the jar into a bowl or on a plate in case any liquid bubbles out. If you’re using the jar in jar method, cover with a kitchen towel and place in a cupboard or pantry for at least a week. Check the level of the liquid every couple days. If the level has dropped, add more brine. After a week, remove a bit of kraut with a fork and test the flavor. If it’s not sour enough for your liking, keep fermenting. (I find that it’s good for me around 10-14 days, but everyone is different. Some like to keep it going for weeks!) When it’s done, cover with a metal Mason jar lid and refrigerate. Keeps for a few months. Remember to keep the kraut submerged in brine the whole time, even in the fridge or it’ll mold.

 Troubleshooting your Beet Ginger Sauerkraut

  • My veggies are slimy. Bad bacteria have probably started to grow in your jar. Best to toss it out to be safe.
  • My veggies have run out of liquid. If this was recent, within a day or so, top off with more brine. If it’s been several days, you may want to throw it out and start again.
  • Help! My veggies are foaming! This is normal especially after the first couple days of fermentation because gases are being released by the bacteria and can cause bubbles or foam. You can skim the foam and keep on rockin’.
  • I see white stuff at the bottom of the jar. Is this okay? Yes. These are the bacteria. It’s totally normal.
  • Um, my veggies have greenish-black mold on top. If you’re adventurous, you can skim it and keep going. This is how moldy ferment has been dealt with for ages (and I can tell you lots of stories about what they do with moldy cheese in the grocery store). If you’re totally grossed out, just start over.
  • It’s been a couple weeks and the veggies still aren’t sour or tangy. You may have them in too cold of a spot. Try putting them in a warmer location to speed up the process a bit.

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Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com

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Muscle Mavens: AHS 2014 Wrap-Up

 

Muscle Mavens: AHS14 Wrap-Up | stupideasypaleo.com

If the theme at PaleoFX earlier this year was “stress,” it’s safe to say that “muscle” was a popular word at the Ancestral Health Symposium (AHS), held just a couple weeks ago. This year’s conference was held at UC Berkeley, and was attended by scientists and researchers, medical practitioners, bloggers and writers, and folks curious to know more about what’s new in the field of ancestral health.

I heard some pretty amazing talks, and while the variety of topics was as diverse as gut health to sustainable coffee (and everything in between), I was pretty taken with how many folks at AHS were talking about muscle.

First worth mentioning was “Specific Requirements & Health Benefits of Strength Training for Women,” the talk I gave with Stacy from Paleo Parents. She is an avid strongwoman competitor, and I’m an Olympic weightlifter, so it was a natural fit to talk about something we are both so passionate about.

Muscle Mavens: AHS14 Wrap-Up | stupideasypaleo.com

photo courtesy Sarah Ballantyne, The Paleo Mom

Here’s our presentation on the AHS14 YouTube channel (I encourage you to check out the other talks…the one on bone broth is excellent!), and here’s a summary:

  • A vast majority of women lack the genetic capability to build very large muscle mass (due to a gene for the protein myostatin and the very small amount of testosterone we produce).
  • To be most effective and positively influence metabolism and body composition, lifting should be 1) heavy (relative to the person’s current capacity); 2) low rep (in the realm of 1-5 reps); 3) involve compound movements such as squats, deadlifts and presses; and 4) involve type II (fast twitch) fibers that are most active under heavy load and “fast” speeds.
  • The 1600+ women who took our survey most often cited improvements in body composition, confidence and a sense of community amongst the reasons they like lifting.

Another excellent talk was Jamie Scott’s lecture on “The Underappreciated Role of Muscle in Health and Disease” (which you can watch for free by clicking here). In it, Jamie elucidated muscle’s grossly underestimated role as an endocrine organ, involved intimately in our body’s metabolism. I highly, HIGHLY recommend you watch his talk.

Muscle Mavens: AHS14 Wrap-Up | stupideasypaleo.com

He also brought home a critical point: In the world of ancestral health and in conventional medicine, we (as a collective) are often focused so much on fat gain or loss that we overlook how important muscle is. This has incredible implications, not just in terms of moving our bodies for sport, but for the regulation of metabolism, and as an incredible protective mechanism as we age.

A couple other great presentations on muscle were by Skyler Tanner and Keith Norris.

I also got to work at my publisher’s booth, and finally got to meet some of the folks involved in making our books reality.  It was pretty surreal to see my cover up there with some other sweet Paleo titles such as The Frugal Paleo Cookbook, The Paleo Foodie, and Paleo Takes 5. My book is being copyedited right now, and then it’s on to the final design phase. You can pre-order through Amazon or Barnes & Noble and save 25%!

Muscle Mavens: AHS14 Wrap-Up | stupideasypaleo.com Muscle Mavens: AHS14 Wrap-Up | stupideasypaleo.com Muscle Mavens: AHS14 Wrap-Up | stupideasypaleo.com

I’m already looking forward to attending the New Zealand AHS next year (with these guys above), and I’m already plotting my presentation.

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Muscle Mavens: AHS14 Wrap-Up | stupideasypaleo.com

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Healing Chicken Soup—Paleo & Whole30

Healing Chicken Soup—Paleo & Whole30 |stupideasypaleo.com

It’s hardly a secret that chicken soup is “good for what ails you”—as my grandmother used to say. If you’re a science nerd like me and want to know the how and why, click here and here. If you’re just here for the yummy recipe, you can skip all that. Suffice to say, maybe this soup isn’t a panacea, but it is definitely delicious.

I kicked up the healing properties of bone broth with the trio of ginger, turmeric, and garlic. Besides tasting aromatic and well, decidedly victorious, ginger and turmeric bring their anti-inflammatory compounds to this dish, and garlic, its antiviral properties. Infusing the broth is well worth the extra twenty minutes!

You can really dress this up anyway you’d like. I added some shredded chicken, green onion, carrot and shiitake mushrooms (gotta love that umami!) along with some gluten-free noodles made from mountain yam. Consider the broth a blank palette upon which to draw with your favorite flavors.

5 from 1 reviews

Healing Chicken Soup—Paleo & Whole30
Serves: Serves 2
 

Ingredients
  • 4 cups (946 mL) chicken broth
  • 2 inch (5.1 cm) piece fresh ginger, sliced into thin coins
  • 1 inch piece (2.5 cm) fresh turmeric*, sliced into thin coins
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled & smashed
  • ½ teaspoon (3 mL) fish sauce
  • 2 cups (280 g) cooked shredded chicken
  • 4 ounces (113 g) shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  • 3 green onions (48 g), white and light green parts, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium carrot (40 g), julienned or shredded
  • Sea salt, to taste
  • Optional: 1 cup (227 g) zucchini noodles, kelp noodles, or mountain yam shiritaki noodles
  • Optional: Paleo Sriracha for drizzling

Instructions
  1. Pour the chicken broth into a medium pot, and add the ginger, turmeric, garlic and fish sauce. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for 20 to 30 minutes to really infuse the broth with flavor. Note: If using turmeric powder (ground turmeric), start with ¼ teaspoon (0.5 gram), and increase to ½ teaspoon (1 gram), depending on your preference. I find turmeric powder to be insanely potent, much more so than the fresh root, so always add less and bump it up if you’d like. While the broth is simmering, prepare the rest of the ingredients.
  2. Using a slotted spoon, remove the ginger, turmeric and garlic. Discard. Or, if you like to live dangerously, leave it all in the soup and pick around it while you’re eating (like I did in the photo). Just be aware: Biting into a large chunk of ginger, turmeric or garlic is usually not pleasant.
  3. Add the chicken, mushrooms, green onions, carrot and if desired, your noodles. Heat about 5 minutes on medium-low or until everything is warmed through. Taste and adjust the seasoning with sea salt.
  4. Serve with a drizzle of sriracha for some extra heat.

Notes
*If you can’t find fresh turmeric root, sub in ¼ teaspoon (0.5 g) turmeric powder. When working with any form of turmeric, take care because it stains hands, clothing and porous surfaces.

Change It Up!

  • Use beef or fish broth instead of chicken.
  • Use any protein you prefer or have on hand.
  • Add in your favorite thinly cut veggies.
  • Instead of fish sauce, substitute 1 teaspoon coconut aminos.

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Healing Chicken Soup—Paleo & Whole30 |stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question? Leave it in the comments below!