Tag Archives: coconut aminos

Paleo Meatballs, Asian-Style

Paleo Meatballs, Asian-Style | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo meatballs, Asian-style! These are super easy, have just five ingredients and are Whole30-friendly. Feel free to dress these up with your favorite dipping sauce or serve alongside a salad—like my Green Papaya Salad—for a complete meal. To feed a really hungry crowd or for leftovers throughout the week, double or triple the batch.

Ingredients for Paleo Meatballs, Asian-Style

Directions for Paleo Meatballs, Asian-Style

  1. Combine the pork, green onions, coconut aminos, sesame oil and fish sauce in a medium bowl. Mix until everything is combined but not over-mixed because that will make the meat tough.
  2. Rolls the meat into balls. I used roughly a heaping Tablespoon of meat per ball. Before cooking all the meat, I like to heat a tiny amount and check for flavor. If it needs more salt, add sea salt to suit your tastes before you proceed.
  3. Heat a skillet over medium-high heat. Add 1 Tablespoon of coconut oil. Add the meatballs in a single layer, being careful not to crowd them. Brown on all sides. Repeat with the remainder of the batch. Hint: If your balls are bigger (no jokes please!), you may want to quickly brown the outsides, then place them on a foil-lined baking sheet in a 350°F (175°C) oven for approximately 10 minutes to cook the insides through.
  4. Serve with your favorite dipping sauce!

Change It Up

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Ahi Tuna Salad

Ahi Tuna Salad Wraps | stupideasypaleo.com Fresh tuna is sooooo tasty…I’ve you’ve never tried it, give it a whirl. It’ll make canned tuna pale in comparison. This recipe is based on one from the Barefoot Contessa, and is a perfect way to add some kick to your plate. Wasabi powder can be found in the Asian food section of the store, and can be REALLY potent, so I suggest adding just a little at a time and seeing if it’s too hot. Finding one without sugar or anything weird can be really tough…it took me a lot of searching to find one that was Paleo-friendly (“Hime” brand…horseradish, spirulina and turmeric are the only ingredients). Don’t like wasabi? You can totally leave it out.

I served this tuna salad on fresh romaine lettuce boats wrapped up into nori and served sushi style. If you don’t like tuna, you could substitute cooked chicken breast.

Prep time: 20 min     Cook time:  5 min     Makes: 2 servings

Ingredients for Ahi Tuna Salad

For the Dressing

For the Salad

  • 1 lb. ahi tuna steak
  • 2 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 avocado, diced
  • 1 Tablespoon sesame seeds
  • Romaine or butter lettuce leaves
  • Nori wraps, optional

Directions for Ahi Tuna Salad

  1. To make the dressing, combine the lime juice, lime zest, coconut aminos, sesame oil, wasabi powder, salt and pepper in a medium bowl. Stir together and set aside.
  2. Pat the fish dry with a paper towel and season with salt and pepper. Grill or pan-fry on high heat for ~2 minutes per side. *Important: you want the fish to be rare inside. If you cook it until well-done it’ll be tough and dry. Allow to cool on a cutting board. Cut into chunks.  Ahi Tuna Salad | stupideasypaleo.com Ahi Tuna Salad | stupideasypaleo.com

3. Add the avocado, green onion, sesame seeds and tuna to the bowl with the dressing. Fold the ingredients together to combine. Ahi Tuna Salad | stupideasypaleo.com Ahi Tuna Salad | stupideasypaleo.com 4. Serve on lettuce boats / cups or wrap with nori. Or, just serve in a bowl with chopped lettuce

Ahi Tuna Salad | stupideasypaleo.com Ahi Tuna Salad | stupideasypaleo.com Ahi Tuna Salad | stupideasypaleo.com

Umami Mayo

Umami Mayo | stupideasypaleo.com Umami basically describes the savory taste present in foods like soy sauce (ick), mushrooms and even some veggies. This recipe is very simple to make: start with a batch of fresh olive oil mayo and then season it with coconut aminos and fish sauce to give it that umami flavor. Nice!

I follow Melissa Joulwan’s basic olive oil mayo recipe because well, she rules and so does her mayo recipe. You can find it here: The Secret to Homemade Mayo? Patience.

Prep time: 5 min     Wait time:  30-60 min    Makes: 1/4 cup

Ingredients for Umami Mayo

Directions for Umami Mayo

  1. Stir the plain olive oil mayo, coconut aminos and fish sauce together in a small bowl. Will keep in the fridge until the expiration date of the egg you used to make your mayo.
  2. Goes well with burgers, my Paleo Banh Mi Sliders or Paleo Fresh Spring Rolls.

Sweet and Savory Blueberry Tortilla

Sweet and Savory Blueberry Tortilla | stupideasypaleo.com

Blueberries and eggs were meant to be together! This is a riff on a Spanish tortilla – a cooked egg dish with potatoes and onion. Instead of those traditional ingredients, I used the technique of making a tortilla and simply added blueberries, coconut aminos and a few spices, and the result was a little bit sweet, a little bit savory.

If you’re going to make a tortilla, be sure to keep the heat low enough to keep the eggs from burning, and you need some cojones when it comes to flipping the eggs! Confidence is key! The pan will be hot, so don’t burn yourself, silly…but don’t hesitate either. You want the tortilla to come out in one beautiful round piece of eggy heaven.

The coconut aminos really add that savory, umami flavor but if you don’t have them, you could just use a dash (1/8 tsp) of salt though it won’t be the same.

Prep time: 5 min     Cook time:  15 min    Makes: 1 serving

Ingredients for Sweet and Savory Blueberry Tortilla

Directions for Sweet and Savory Blueberry Tortilla

  1. Crack the eggs into a bowl and scramble with the coconut aminos, cinnamon and pepper.
  2. In a small nonstick skillet over medium heat, add the ghee or coconut oil.
  3. Pour the eggs into the pan and allow to cook for 2-3 minutes undisturbed. Sprinkle the blueberries onto the eggs.
  4. Cook for about 6-8 more minutes on low. Throughout that time, using the edge of a spatula, lift up the tortilla (eggs) and allow some of the liquid eggs to flow underneath. When most of the egg is cooked through, you’re ready to flip the tortilla.
  5. You need confidence here!! Remove the skillet from the heat, and put a small plate upside down on top of the skillet. Quickly flip the skillet over and the tortilla should fall out onto the plate. Be careful not to burn yourself!
  6. Now, slide the tortilla back into the skillet and cook for another 2-3 minutes.
  7. Eat. That was exciting, wasn’t it?!

Blueberry Kale Omelette

Blueberry Kale Omelette | stupideasypaleo.com

I know what you’re probably thinking: “Really, Steph…blueberries and eggs?! Weird.” Just trust me on this one. The idea of combining fruit with eggs was actually inspired by my longtime pal Allison who has been doing that for quite some time. I finally decided to bite the bullet and make my own variation which was a nice departure from steamed eggs, my usual standby. No kale? Precooked spinach with the moisture drained out of it would make a good substitute. The coconut aminos add a great savory contrast to the sweetness of the berries. The name “omelette” might not be completely accurate here, but I since couldn’t think of what else to call it, that’s what I’m sticking with!

Prep time: 5 min     Cook time: 10 min    Makes: 1 serving

Ingredients for Blueberry Kale Omelette

Directions for Blueberry Kale Omelette

  1. In a small bowl, whisk eggs with coconut aminos.
  2. Add a spoonful of your fat of choice to a small nonstick skillet over medium heat. Saute the kale for 2-3 minutes until softened and a bit wilted.
  3. Add the blueberries to the kale and cook for another 2-3 minutes.
  4. Pour the egg mixture into the pan and let it cook undisturbed for 3-4 minutes. Use a spatula to loosen the bottom of the eggs and then carefully flip them over. Allow the eggs to cook through, another couple of minutes.

Paleo Banh Mi Sliders

Paleo Banh Mi Sliders | stupideasypaleo.com

Banh Mi is basically a Vietnamese sandwich made with French bread and layers of amazing flavors: sweet, salty, tangy, umami (savory) and spicy. [Side note: “Whaaaat?! A Vietnamese sandwich with French bread?” Yes. A quick Google search of French Indochina will give you all the historical details]. Vegetables, meat and spices combine in harmony and sing on your palate. There are as many variations and ways to make banh mi as you can possibly imagine, even breakfast versions and those with more traditional fillings like Vietnamese cold cuts and (gasp!) head cheese. This recipe is a take on Banh Mi flavors.

Of course, as all good Paleophiles do, you’ve tossed all offending grains and grain products out of your life for good. Sandwiches in the traditional sense are long gone, unless you resort to making or buying Paleo bread – which is usually pretty disappointing, am I right? These Banh Mi Sliders are going to punch you in the face with so much flavor that you won’t even miss the bready platforms of yesteryear.

One of the key ingredients in these sliders is the homemade umami mayo. If you’ve never made it, I highly recommend you check out Melissa Joulwan’s recipe for mayo from her awesome book, Well Fed or her website (linked below). You can make the mayo and the pickled carrot and daikon ahead of time if you’re busy during the week; heck, make a big batch of sliders in advance – the recipe doubles nicely as well – and just assemble these tasty wee bites on demand.

Prep Time: 30 min     Cook Time: 10 min     Makes: ~15 sliders

Ingredients for Paleo Banh Mi Sliders

For the Pickled Veggies

  • ½ cup water
  • ¼ cup white vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp honey
  • ½ cup julienned carrot
  • ½ cup julienned daikon radish
  • Salt
  1. In a small saucepan, combine the water, vinegar and honey. Heat on medium-high until boiling.
  2. Pour the hot liquid over the carrot and daikon radish in a heatproof bowl. Add salt to taste.
  3. Let the vegetables pickle for at least 30 minutes. You can make this the day ahead of time and store it in the refrigerator.

For the Umami Mayo

  • 1 egg
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp mustard powder
  • 1.25 cups light tasting olive oil
  • Coconut aminos (you’ll use 1.5 tsp for every ¼ cup mayo)
  1. Check out the directions for making homemade mayo here or watch the video here.
  2. Mix ¼ cup of the mayo with 1.5 tsp coconut aminos in a small bowl.

For the Sliders

  • 1 pound of lean ground pork
  • 2 green onions, sliced thin
  • 1 Tbsp fresh grated ginger (or ⅛ tsp dried ginger)
  • 1 Tbsp fresh minced garlic (or 1 tsp garlic powder)
  • 1 Tbsp lime juice
  • 1 tsp fish sauce (I like Red Boat)
  • ½ a jalapeno pepper, seeded and chopped (optional)
  • Zest of 1 lime
  • Small handful of fresh cilantro, chopped
  1. Mix all the ingredients in a bowl and shape into sliders (mini-burgers).
  2. Pan fry or grill until completely cooked through, about 3-4 minutes per side.

To Assemble the Sliders

  • 1 head of Boston (Bibb) or Romaine lettuce (Boston gives you a better cup to make the  sliders in)
  • Thinly sliced English cucumber
  • Thinly sliced jalapeno (optional)
  • Chili oil (optional)
  • Fresh cilantro
  • Umami mayo
  • Pickled carrot and daikon

In each lettuce leaf, place one slider and top with sliced cucumber, jalapeno, chili oil, cilantro, mayo and pickled carrot and daikon.

Super Bowl Bites: Orange Ginger Chicken Wings

Orange Ginger Chicken Wings | stupideasypaleo.com

Stupid Easy Paleo, coming at you with another snack for your Super Bowl party (or any time you damn please). I recently read that chicken wing consumption is at an all-time national high which explains why I couldn’t find any the first time I went to the store. Luckily, my persistence paid off. When I was thinking of what flavors to baste these little flappers with, my mind automatically went to orange and ginger with a bit of heat. These wings are pretty damn Paleo and though there are a couple tablespoons of honey in the recipe, it really helps to give it that sticky glaze that we all love to lick off our fingers. Easily double the batch to feed your hungry bunch!

Prep time: 20 min     Cook time: 40 min    Makes: 1-1/2 pounds (about 12 wings)

Ingredients for Orange Ginger Chicken Wings

  • 1-1/2 pounds (~750 grams) chicken wings
  • 2 oranges
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 1-1/2 tbsp coconut aminos
  • 1 thumb-sized piece of fresh ginger
  • 1 serrano pepper* (optional)
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • 3 tbsp coconut oil
  • Toasted sesame seeds for garnish

Directions for Orange Ginger Chicken Wings

  1. Preheat the oven to 375C (190F). Line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper.
  2. Prepare the sauce in a small saucepan: Remove the zest from one orange using a microplane or grater, then add the juice of both oranges to the pan. Grate about 1 tbsp of ginger into the juice using the microplane. Add the apple cider vinegar, honey, coconut aminos, minced serrano pepper (remove the seeds and inner pith for a milder flavor) and salt. 
  3. Simmer the glaze on medium-low heat until it reduces and thickens, coating the back of a spoon. This may take several minutes.
  4. Meanwhile, add the coconut oil to a large skillet over medium-high heat. Pat the chicken wings dry with a paper towel and fry on each side to crisp / brown the skin a bit. Remove and drain on some clean paper towels.
  5. In a large bowl, toss the wings with the orange-ginger glaze. Remove wings from the glaze with a slotted spoon. Arrange wings on the baking sheet and save any excess glaze.
  6. Bake for 15 min, remove from oven, flip them over and baste with glaze. (NOTE: discard any unused glaze at this point as it’s been in contact with raw chicken).
  7. Bake for 15 more min or until completely cooked through.
  8. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and EAT.

*Note: Serrano peppers are hotter than jalapeños, so substitute those if you’d like or leave them out entirely. Wash your hands well immediately after handling the peppers and for goodness sake, don’t rub your eyes (or your nether regions).

Paleo Noodle Bowl

Paleo Noodle Bowl | stupideasypaleo.com

After a brief hiatus – traveling back to the States and returning to reality – I’m back with a tasty new recipe. This meal was inspired by 1) Patton Oswalt’s stand up comedy routine on KFC’s “eating my lunch in a single bowl”  and 2) every noodle dish that you miss when you eat Paleo. Zucchini noodles form the base of the bowl…wait, what’s that? No julienne peeler? Try kelp noodles, use a spiralizer or test your patience at julienne by hand instead (or honestly, just make the veggie / shrimp combo and eat that because it’s TASTY).

Almond butter, coconut aminos and fish sauce combine to make the creamy, umami-powered sauce in this comfort dish. For my friends living abroad: I just spent 3 weeks in the UK and realize that ingredients like coconut aminos are harder to find than Nessie or a prancing unicorn. You could substitute something like gluten-free tamari instead. Also, if shrimp isn’t your thing, substitute any cooked protein. The quantities listed below made about 6 cups of veggies + shrimp and another 2-3 cups of zucchini noodles.

Ingredients for Paleo Noodle Bowl

  • 4 medium-sized zucchini
  • Sea salt
  • 1 lb (500 g) raw shrimp
  • 1/2 of a small green cabbage
  • 1/2 of a white onion
  • 1 carrot
  • 3 green onions
  • 4 oz. shiitake mushrooms
  • 1/2 cup snow peas
  • 1/4 cup smooth almond butter
  • 3 Tablespoons coconut aminos
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce
  • Coconut oil
  • Cilantro for garnish, optional

Directions for Paleo Noodle Bowl

1. Make the zucchini noodles by using a julienne peeler or spiralizer. Put noodles into a strainer and sprinkle generously with salt. Let the noodles sit for at least 20 minutes until they soften and water drains out. [Science nerd alert: You've created a hypertonic environment with the salt which pulls water out of the plant cells via osmosis.] Rinse the noodles well and squeeze gently to remove the excess moisture. Set aside.

2. Meanwhile, peel and devein the shrimp if needed.

3. Prep the veggies: slice all the veggies into pieces of roughly the same thickness.

4. In a large skillet over medium-high heat: add the coconut oil and when it’s hot, sauté all the veggies until softened but still a bit crisp, about 5 minutes.

5. Add the shrimp and cook until pink, about 2 minutes.

6. Add the almond butter, coconut aminos and fish sauce to the pan. Stir until the almond butter is well incorporated.

7. Plate the zucchini noodles on the bottom (I like them uncooked but you could heat them through) and the shrimp / veggies on top. Garnish with cilantro.

8. Delight in the fact that you’re eating your lunch from a single bowl. Yeah!

Easy Chicken Stir Fry

Easy Chicken Stir Fry | stupideasypaleo.com

Some of my favorite meals are things I just throw together with the ingredients I have on hand. This recipe’s inspiration came from Nom Nom Paleo: a quick stir fry with lots of veggies and big bold flavors. The secret to winning big in the kitchen is to have some key items on hand at all times: aromatics like garlic, ginger and onions; flavorings such as vinegars, coconut aminos and fish sauce; canned pantry items like coconut milk, sardines, salmon and crushed tomatoes. With basics like this in your pantry plus a good selection of herbs and spices, it’s easy to make something tasty and not boring. Can we stop doing boring food? Agreed? Agreed.

Ingredients for Easy Chicken Stir Fry

  • Coconut oil or fat of choice
  • 2 onions, sliced
  • 6 oz. (170 g) bok choy, chopped
  • 4 oz. (120 g) shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  • Thumb-sized piece of ginger, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup (120mL) chicken broth
  • 2 teaspoon rice wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoon coconut aminos
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce
  • Leftover chicken, pulled from the bone (any protein would work)

Easy Chicken Stir Fry | stupideasypaleo.com

Directions for Easy Chicken Stir Fry

1. Prepare veggies (slice onions and mushrooms, chop bok choy and finely chop ginger and garlic).

2. Heat a large skillet over medium-low and add a spoonful of your fat of choice. Sweat onions until translucent and soft, about 10 minutes. Adding a sprinkle of salt will help in this process (draws out the moisture because of hypertonicity…it’s science, yo).

3. Turn up the heat to medium-high. Add garlic and ginger and cook for about 30 seconds. It should start to smell amazing in your kitchen.

4. Add the mushrooms and sautee until softened, about 4-5 minutes.

5. Then, add the bok choy, broth, vinegar, coconut aminos and fish sauce. Heat until the bok choy softens and cooks down, just a few minutes.

6. Add the chicken and heat through.

Garlic-Ginger Baby Bok Choy

Garlic Ginger Bok Choy | stupideasypaleo.com

This is one of those 5 minute side dishes that will leave you no excuses why you can’t eat some vegetables with your meal. This isn’t rocket surgery, after all. If your market doesn’t sell the tiny bok choy, you can get bigger ones and cut them in quarters.

Ingredients for Garlic Ginger Bok Choy

  • 1 pound (500 grams) baby bok choy
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger (or 1/2 teaspoon fresh ginger, minced)
  • 1 Tablespoon coconut aminos
  • 1 Tablespoon water
  • 1 spoonful coconut oil (or fat of choice)

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Directions for Garlic Ginger Bok Choy

1. Slice the baby bok choy in half.

2. Heat a skillet over medium heat. Add the fat and then sauté the garlic for 30 seconds.

3. Add in the baby bok choy, ginger and coconut aminos. Stir to combine.

4. Add 1 tbsp water and cover the skillet. Allow the bok choy to steam for 3-4 minutes or until softened.

Green Papaya Salad

Green Papaya Salad | stupideasypaleo.com

I fell in love with Green Papaya Salad on my trip to Bali in 2011. We took a side trip to Nusa Lembongan, a tiny island off the coast of Bali and spent a couple days snorkeling and enjoying maximum relaxation time. While there, we dined outside at a Thai restaurant and I had my first taste of this dish…flavors of savory, spicy, sour and a little sweet all duked it out on my tongue.

Ever since then, I’ve wanted to make Green Papaya Salad (or som tam as it’s called in Thai) myself and make it Paleo-friendly. I’ll admit, this recipe may fit under the “special” category because you may have to do a little searching outside a conventional grocery store to find some of the ingredients, but any Asian food market should have these basic ingredients. Our local health food market actually has everything you’d need except the fish sauce and dried shrimp!

Most of the recipes I searched on-line use peanuts, bean sprouts and sugar to develop the complex flavor profile of som tam. With a few swaps, I figured out a couple ingredients that did the trick. I substituted cucumber for the bean sprouts (similar in color and texture) and roasted unsalted cashews for the peanuts.

Ingredients for the Green Papaya Salad

  • 1 medium-sized green papaya, about 4 cups shredded
  • 1/2 a cucumber
  • 2 generous handfuls of cherry tomatoes
  • 3 green onions
  • 12 green beans
  • 1 or 2 Thai red chili peppers*
  • 1/2 cup Thai basil leaves, washed and packed
  • 1/4 cup fresh lime juice
  • 2 Tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1 Tablespoons coconut aminos
  • 2 Tablespoons dried shrimp, optional
  • Cashews and cilantro for garnish

Directions for the Green Papaya Salad

1. Peel the papaya with a sharp knife. Julienne the flesh using a julienne peeler (as I did) or use a box grater to achieve a similar effect.

2. Prep the remaining veggies:

  • Peel and slice the cucumber lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds and slice flesh into match-stick sized pieces.
  • Quarter the cherry tomatoes.
  • Slice the green onion into match-stick sized pieces (discard upper dark green parts).
  • Slice the green beans on the bias (diagonal) into long pieces.
  • *Mince the Thai chilis. CAUTION: Thai chili peppers, though tiny is size, pack a whallop of heat. Take care not to touch your eyes, etc when prepping them. I scooped out all the seeds prior to mincing and it was still a medium-spicy. I recommend starting with ONE and upping to two or three if it’s not hot enough for you.
  • Roughly chop the basil leaves. Add all veggies and papaya to a large mixing bowl.

3. Juice the limes and pour over the veggies. Hint: Roll your limes on the counter prior to squeezing to help release the juice.

4. Add fish sauce, coconut aminos and (optional) a drizzle of honey.

5. If you prefer, add the dried shrimp and then let sit for 30 min for all the flavors to meld. Garnish with chopped cashews and cilantro prior to serving. Serve straight up or as a delicious side dish to grilled chicken or fish.

Enjoy the taste-circus that’s about to happen in your mouth!

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Green Papaya Salad | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Beef Jerky

Paleo Beef Jerky…salty, meaty and chewy.

It’s beef jerky, of course, and we all seem to love it. What I don’t love is 1) the price and 2) all the other chemicals and crap they put in it. With that in mind, I did a little research and made this simple recipe (and if you were wondering, it is Whole30-approved).

The coconut aminos really are the key to the flavor (plus, it’s not soy-based and has a lot less sodium than soy sauce and is devoid of gluten unlike tamari).

You can certainly use a dehydrator (like this one) to make your jerky, but you can still make it in the oven if you don’t have one. Directions are below.

Paleo Beef Jerky | stupideasypaleo.com

 

Ingredients for Paleo Beef Jerky

  • 1 lb (500 g) lean London broil or top sirloin (grass-fed if you can find it)
  • 1 bottle coconut aminos (I used ~half the bottle or 4 oz, found in the vinegar section of the market)

Equipment to Make Paleo Beef Jerky

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Directions for Paleo Beef Jerky

1. Trim all visible fat from the meat. Throw the whole steak in the freezer for 30-45 minutes. You want to firm up the meat (ha!) before you slice it.

2. Remove from the freezer and use a sharp knife to cut the steak against the grain (so it’s not as tough) and on the bias (diagonally, so you get wider pieces). You want the pieces to be less than 1/8″ thickness and as consistent as possible.

3. Throw the pieces in a large plastic bag and pour about 1/3-1/2 cup of the coconut aminos into the bag.

4. BE PATIENT and let marinate it for a few hours (or overnight). Trust me…it’ll taste better.

5. To dehydrate (jerkify), set your oven to 200 degrees. Line two baking sheets with aluminum foil. Place the racks on top (again, you want to leave the jerky exposed to air on both sides). I used cooling racks intended for baking.

6. Place jerky on the racks, leaving a little space between.

7. Bake for at least two 2 hours (checking frequently) or until it is, well, jerky-like! You want it to be dry.

8. Store in an airtight container. I put mine in the fridge so it’ll keep even longer.

So, as you can see, stupid-easy…you just need some patience. It may not taste like the overly salty jerky you are used to, but I promise it’s so much better (and cheaper!). You could definitely mix it up by adding some chopped jalapenos, garlic, or crushed black pepper into the marinade to. Check out this version from The Food Lovers Kitchen (with garlic and smoky chipotle) and this one from my good pal Jen’s Gone Paleo (with a hint of sweetness from apple juice). Enjoy!

Best Cauliflower Side Dish Ever

Best Cauliflower Side Dish Ever | stupideasypaleo.com

This is a remake of an older recipe I had on my other blog. If you’ve landed here because you are participating in the Whole30, this dish falls within the nutritional parameters of the program. It’s quick and satisfying and makes a large portion which I like, because I can eat the leftovers for a few days.

Ingredients for Best Cauliflower Side Dish Ever

  • 1 head cauliflower, grated
  • 1 package, shittake mushrooms
  • 6 green onions
  • 2 shallots, minced
  • 1 tsp fresh ginger, minced
  • 3 Tbsp coconut aminos
  • 3 eggs
  • Coconut oil
  • Meat of choice (I used grilled steak)
  • Dark sesame oil

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Directions for Best Cauliflower Side Dish Ever

1. Grate the cauliflower using a food processor (or if you have time and the patience of a saint, a box grater).

2. Prep the veggies (slice the green onions and mushrooms thinly and mince the shallot/ginger).

3. Heat a large skillet/wok to high heat. Add a spoonful or two of coconut oil. Saute the mushrooms, shallot and ginger for ~3 min or until they begin to soften, stirring often.

4. Add the cauliflower, green onions and coconut aminos. Saute for ~5 min.

5. Push the veggies to the side of the skillet and create a well. Crack the eggs into the well and scramble. Stir everything to combine.

6. Top with a meat of your choice. I prepared it this time with slices of grilled steak on top. Shrimp is also delicious with this.

7. A nice drizzle of sesame oil to finish off the dish after it’s been plated is super yummy.

Grass-Fed Sirloin with Kelp Noodle Stir-Fry

Grass-Fed Sirloin with Kelp Noodle Stir-Fry | stupideasypaleo.com This week I had the chance to finally visit Homegrown Meats in La Jolla, CA and peruse their selection of awesome, locally-grown and grass-fed beef. Along with some homemade duck sausages, chorizo, veal liver, and a flank steak, a crazy-delicious looking “baseball-cut” sirloin steak made it into my bag. Even though I’ve had grass-fed steaks before (mostly from Whole Foods), I have to say…this steak was far and above superior. Simply put…the best steak I’ve ever eaten. Amazingly, I paid about $11/lb compared to the $9/lb that our local supermarket charges for grain-fed New York Strip.

I pan-seared it and finished it in the oven to a nice medium/medium-rare and paired it with a simple kelp noodle stir-fry. Bottom line: seek out a local butcher in your area. Invest in some nice quality grass-fed beef (click here for a great post about the advantages of grass-fed) and simply enjoy.

Ingredients for Grass-Fed Sirloin with Kelp Noodle Stir-Fry 

For the Steak

  • Grass-fed sirloin steak
  • Salt and pepper
  • Trader Joe’s South American Smoke Seasoning (or if not available, use powdered smoked paprika or seasoning of choice)

For the Kelp Noodles

  • 1 package kelp “noodles”, rinsed (found at Whole Foods or other health-food store)
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tbsp coconut aminos
  • Handful of fresh chopped chives or green onion
  • Coconut oil
  • Sesame oil (for garnish)
  • Sriracha or other hot sauce

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Directions for Grass-Fed Sirloin with Kelp Noodle Stir-Fry 

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

2.  Remove steak from refrigerator at least 15 minutes prior to cooking so it warms up before cooking. Grill or sear/bake the steak.

3. For sear/bake: Heat a medium-sized cast iron skillet on high heat. Season steak and sear both sides for 3-4 minutes until a nice brown crust forms. Transfer skillet to the oven and bake for approximately another 8 minutes. Cooking time will vary depending on your desired done-ness and oven strength. Allow meat to rest for at least 5 min before slicing.

4. In the same skillet you cooked the steak: heat coconut oil. Sauté noodles until they soften (~5 min).

5. Add in garlic, chives, and  coconut aminos and sauté 30 more seconds.

6. Remove from heat and garnish with a drizzle of sesame oil.

7. Serve steak slices over noodles and top with sriracha or hot sauce if desired.