Tag Archives: garlic

Paleo Sweet Chili Dipping Sauce

Paleo Sweet Chili Dipping Sauce | stupideasypaleo.com Dipping sauces can take the same basic meal template and jazz things up to keep you from suffering from FBS (Food Boredom Syndrome). Plain chicken and broccoli again? Drizzle on some Sweet Chili Dipping Sauce. Need an accompaniment for some beautiful cooked, chilled shrimp? This one does the trick, too. It does have honey (so don’t go overboard and eat gallons of it) but if you’re looking for something to stave off FBS, feel good that it doesn’t contain weird chemicals or high-fructose corn syrup like most of the prepared sauces in the market.

No arrowroot powder? You could use tapioca flour as a thickener. Wish to avoid those completely? You can gently reduce the sauce until it thickens a bit, though it won’t have the same texture as arrowroot or tapioca.

Paleo Sweet Chili Dipping Sauce | stupideasypaleo.com

Ingredients for Paleo Sweet Chili Dipping Sauce

Directions for Paleo Sweet Chili Dipping Sauce

  1. Mince the garlic finely and use a microplane grater to grate down the ginger (or mince very finely).
  2. In a small saucepan, combine all the ingredients: the vinegar, garlic, honey, red chilis, arrowroot, ginger, salt and cayenne pepper (if desired). Stir so the arrowroot is dissolved.
  3. Bring the ingredients to a boil and cook briefly (~1 min or less) until the sauce thickens.
  4. Cool and serve alongside your favorite meats for dipping. It’s be super tasty with chicken, as a sauce on top of salmon or drizzled on top of stir-fried veggies.

What’s your favorite dipping sauce you’d like to see a Paleo version of?

Paleo Sweet Chili Dipping Sauce | stupideasypaleo.com

 

Tasty Topping: Bacon Gremolata

Bacon Gremolata | stupideasypaleo.com

But before I get to the bacon…

I’m over the moon because I just found out I’m nominated for a Paleo Magazine Best of 2013 Award: Best Savory Recipe (Online) for my tangy Carolina-style Kickin’ BBQ Shredded Chicken! Voting for all your favorite Paleo blogs, cookbooks, podcasts and products only takes a couple minutes. Click here to vote >> VOTE! (And a huge, huge thank you for all your support!!)

Now, back to your regularly scheduled bacon…

You’re probably wondering what the heck a gremlinolata is. It’s an Italian condiment traditionally used to sprinkle on top of osso bucco, but I’d argue it’s good for putting on pretty much anything savory. Consider it like a fancy alternative to bacon bits that’s super easy to make and has a pretty rad flavor profile. You know why this one rules? If you saw my post on 5 Paleo Flavor-Making Juggernauts, this magic topping has four of the five: salt (from the bacon), fresh herbs, citrusy lemon zest and aromatic garlic.

It’s as versatile a garish as you can imagine. Sprinkle on soups, stews, veggies or meat for an extra pop of flavor. Guests will be so impressed. No guests? You’ll impress yourself. Just keep in mind, it’s potent so wield your new flavor-weapon carefully.

The key to a nice gremolata is to make the pieces all uniform in size. There’s nothing worse than biting into a huge chunk of raw garlic so it’s time to work on your knife skills.

Bacon Gremolata | stupideasypaleo.com

Ingredients for Bacon Gremolata

  • 2 strips of bacon, cooked until crispy
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced finely or crushed
  • 4 Tablespoons of finely chopped flat leaf parsley
  • Zest of 2 lemons
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Bacon Gremolata | stupideasypaleo.com

Directions for Bacon Gremolata

  1. Before you get the rest of the ingredients working, start cooking the bacon. [I like to bake my bacon in the oven on a rimmed baking sheet lined with parchment paper for 15-20 minutes at 350°F / 175°C or until it's crispy. Feel free to cook using your preferred method.]
  2. Meanwhile, peel and mince or crush the garlic (fine pieces). Finely chop the parsley. Zest the lemons, removing the outer yellow skin but not the white pith (I like a microplane for this job). Combine these ingredients in a small bowl.
  3. When the bacon is done cooking, allow it to cool and either crumble with your hands or chop into fine bits. Add to the bowl.
  4. Drizzle in the olive oil and then adjust the taste with salt and pepper. Let the ingredients marry for about an hour before using for best flavor.

Simple Garlicky Greens

Simple Garlicky Greens | stupideasypaleo.com

This is by far my favorite way to use kale or any other greens because it imparts just a bit more flavor. You can use any dark leafy green and the particularly tough ones like kale, collards, broccoli rabe, dandelion greens, etc work really well. You can do this with spinach as well, but cut down the cooking time so it doesn’t turn to mush.

Simple Garlicky Greens | stupideasypaleo.com

Ingredients for Simple Garlicky Greens

  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil 
  • 3-4 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced
  • 1 very large bunch of greens, rinsed and chopped
  • 2 Tablespoons chicken broth or water
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions for Simple Garlicky Greens

  1. Add the oil to a large, cold skillet. Add the sliced garlic and cook on low for about 4-6 minutes or just until it starts to brown on the edges. Don’t let it burn though…because burnt garlic isn’t tasty!
  2. Add the chopped greens and chicken broth (or water) and turn up the heat to medium. Stir and cook for anywhere from 4-6 minutes, depending on how tough the greens are. You want them to be tender but not mushy. Greens like collards will take longer because they’re very thick.
  3. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Citrus-Garlic Marinated Steak

Citrus-Garlic Marinated Steak | stupideasypaleo.com I’ve just returned from a week-long trip to London and Paris, hence how quiet I’ve been on the site here. If you’ve left a comment or sent an email, it will take a bit longer than usual but rest assured I’ll get back to you. I love traveling and discovering new foods, but I also really like getting back to my kitchen so I can make my favorite recipes and think of new ones.

This simple marinated steak was great over a fresh garden salad – use any veggies you’d like – served with some guacamole on the side. Or it’d make an awesome filling for my Simple Paleo Tortillas! If you don’t like beef, you could use chicken or pork. I bought some inexpensive steaks and cut them into strips for quick cooking. Alternatively, you could keep the meat whole, marinate it, grill it and then slice into strips once it’s cooked.

Ingredients for Citrus-Garlic Marinated Steak

  • 1 lb. of steak, cut into strips
  • Zest and juice of 1 lemon, 1 orange and 1 lime
  • 1 Tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 or 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper

Directions for Citrus-Garlic Marinated Steak

  1. Put the steak strips in a large bowl.
  2. Add the zest and juice of the citrus fruit, olive oil, garlic, salt, smoked paprika and pepper. Stir the ingredients thoroughly.
  3. Let marinate in the refrigerator, covered, for at least 30-60 minutes for best results. Stir once or twice as it’s marinating.
  4. When ready to cook, heat a skillet over medium-high heat and add about half the steak. If it gets overcrowded it won’t brown. I cooked about 1.5 minutes on each side for medium.
  5. Repeat with the rest of the meat.

Garlic Ginger Brussels Sprouts

Garlic Ginger Brussels Sprouts | stupideasypaleo.com More veggies, please!

This is a pretty simple side dish that compliments virtually any main. To save cooking time, I sliced the Brussels sprouts thinly, but if you’re crunched you could either buy them pre-sliced (I’ve seen them at Trader Joe’s) or halve and steam them, then throw them in the pan. I don’t recommend putting them in whole because they’ll take forever to cook. Adding a splash of coconut aminos at the end of cooking is a nice compliment, but if you don’t have it, salt will do just fine. Just taste before adding depending on how salty the bacon is.

Ingredients for Garlic Ginger Brussels Sprouts 

  • 4 pieces of bacon, chopped
  • 1 lb. (500 g) Brussels sprouts, thinly sliced
  • 2 carrots, cut into ribbons with a veggie peeler
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1″ piece of fresh ginger, peeled and grated
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Garlic Ginger Brussels Sprouts | stupideasypaleo.com Directions for Garlic Ginger Brussels Sprouts

  1. In a large skillet over medium heat, render the bacon until it’s crispy.
  2. Add the thinly sliced Brussels sprouts and carrots. Cook on medium-high heat for about 6-8 minutes or until the sprouts have begun to brown.
  3. Add the garlic and ginger in the last 1-2 minutes of cooking and stir to combine (adding the garlic at the end reduces the chance it’ll burn and taste bitter).
  4. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Red pepper flakes are also good instead of black pepper.

Creamy Paleo Avocado Pesto

Creamy Paleo Avocado Pesto | stupideasypaleo.com

Avocado pesto blends the both of avocados and well, pesto in a really tasty and creamy combination. Serving suggestions: mix into zucchini noodles, use as a dip for veggies or spread over eggs.

Prep time: 10 min     Cook time:  0 min     Makes: ~2-1/2 cups

Ingredients for Creamy Paleo Avocado Pesto

  • 2 large ripe avocados, peeled
  • 1 cup basil leaves, packed
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 2-3 cloves of garlic, depending on your preference
  • 1/2 cup pine nuts (or a mixture of pine nuts and pistachios)
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • ~1/3 to 1/2 cup olive oil

Creamy Paleo Avocado Pesto | stupideasypaleo.com Directions for Creamy Paleo Avocado Pesto

  1. In a food processor combine all the ingredients except the olive oil. 
  2. While the food processor is running, drizzle in the olive oil. Add less if you like a thicker pesto and more if you want it thinner.

Paleo Peach Mango Ginger Chutney

Paleo Peach Mango Ginger Chutney | stupideasypaleo.com When I made my Coconut Wild Boar Burgers, I was searching for the perfect accompaniment. Peaches were calling to me because they’re in season and juicy and pair really well with pork, so I created this Paleo peach chutney to put on top almost like a relish. Chutney, traditional to Indian cuisine, is a condiment that combines fruit, vinegar, sugar and spices. Being Paleo, I left out the sugar and instead of using oil, I stirred in ghee for a rich buttery flavor.

Putting vinegar, onion and garlic in with fruit may sound weird but it gives just the right counterbalance to the fruit’s sweetness.

Prep time: 10 min     Cook time:  10-15 min     Makes: ~2 cups

Ingredients for Paleo Peach Mango Ginger Chutney 

  • 2 Tablespoons ghee
  • 1/4 cup onion, minced
  • 3 peaches, diced
  • 1/4 cup mango, diced
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 1 Tablespoon orange juice
  • 1 Tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • Zest from 1 orange

Directions for Paleo Peach Mango Ginger Chutney

  1. In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the ghee, and minced onion. Cook until the onion is translucent, a few minutes. 
  2. Add the peaches, mango, garlic, orange juice, apple cider vinegar, ginger, red pepper flakes and orange zest. (I zested the orange, then cut it open and used the juice from inside. Hint: use a microplane grater to zest the orange and grate down the garlic and ginger, saving time.) Paleo Peach Mango Ginger Chutney | stupideasypaleo.com

3. Turn heat to low and continue to simmer until the fruit is softened but not overly mushy.  Paleo Peach Mango Ginger Chutney | stupideasypaleo.com

4. Spoon over pork burgers or chops, chicken or even salmon.  Paleo Peach Mango Ginger Chutney | stupideasypaleo.com

Roasted Salsa Verde

Roasted Salsa Verde| stupideasypaleo.com Every once in a while, I buy prepared salsa from the store. A bottle of organic salsa verde (green salsa) made its way into my cart recently and though I’d scanned the label for any non-Whole30 ingredients, I didn’t notice xantham gum last on the list. Xanthan gum is a thickener – it IS okay to eat on your Whole30 – but when I opened the salsa, the texture was weird and a bit slimy.

Immediately I knew that I could do better and just make my own. There are a million variations of salsa verde it seems: raw, roasted, different ratios of tomatillos to jalapeño, etc. but I found this one worked well for my taste buds. It was pretty mild but you could make it hotter by leaving the seeds and membranes of the jalapeño pepper intact.

Prep time: 5 min     Cook time:  15 min     Makes: 3 cups

Ingredients for Roasted Salsa Verde

  • 1-1/2 lb tomatillos (these look like green tomatoes but are more closely related to gooseberries)
  • 1 jalapeño pepper
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 cup onion, roughly chopped
  • 1 large handful of cilantro leaves
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Directions for Roasted Salsa Verde

  1. Place the whole tomatillos and whole jalapeño pepper on a foil lined baking sheet. Broil in the oven on high for 5-10 minutes until the veggies start to char a bit. Flip over and broil another 5-10 minutes on the other side. *You can also char them on a grill or in a pan on the stove. Allow them to cool a bit. Roasted Salsa Verde | stupideasypaleo.com Roasted Salsa Verde | stupideasypaleo.com Roasted Salsa Verde | stupideasypaleo.com

2. Slice the jalapeño in half and remove some or all of the white membrane and seeds (if you want a mild salsa verde).

3. Put the tomatillos, jalapeño, garlic cloves, onion, cilantro, lime juice and salt in a blender or food processor. Pulse until the salsa is to the desired consistency. I like mine a little bit chunky but you can puree until smooth if desired. Roasted Salsa Verde | stupideasypaleo.com

4. Keep refrigerated. Keeps for several days in the fridge. Roasted Salsa Verde | stupideasypaleo.com

 

Simple Shrimp Ceviche

Simple Shrimp Ceviche | stupideasypaleo.com Can I interest you in a meal that cooks itself?

Yes? I thought so!

It’s not too good to be true, it’s just ceviche – a dish of seafood that’s “cooked” using citrus juices and served up with ingredients like tomato, jalapeño and avocado. YUM. Last year, I posted a recipe for ceviche – along with one of the first videos I ever made…eeeek – and recently, I created a different one with shrimp that came out just as good (if not better).

Since I cook for just one person, I only used 1/2 lb. of shrimp but you can easily double the recipe or more. Plan the day (or morning) ahead so you can give the ceviche enough time to “cook”. If you don’t like shrimp, you can substitute scallops or firm white fish. Rumor has it that the juice from the marinade is a hangover cure though I haven’t tested that theory yet ;)

Prep time: 15-20 min     Cook time: 6+ hours    Makes: ~3 cups

Ingredients for Simple Shrimp Ceviche

  • 1/2 lb. (~250 g) raw shrimp
  • 1 large tomato, diced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1/2 a jalapeño pepper, minced (optional)
  • 1/2 an avocado, cubed
  • Juice of 1 orange
  • Juice of 2 lemons
  • Juice of 2 limes
  • 1/4 cup cilantro, chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Simple Shrimp Ceviche | stupideasypaleo.com

Directions for Simple Shrimp Ceviche

  1. Peel and devein the shrimp, if necessary. Chop the shrimp into small pieces.
  2. Prepare the veggies: dice the tomato, mince the garlic and jalapeño, and cube the avocado. If you want the ceviche to be spicier, you can leave the seeds in or add more jalapeño.
  3. Mix the shrimp, tomato, garlic, jalapeño and avocado in a bowl. Squeeze the citrus juice on top and combine. There should be enough liquid to cover the shrimp.
  4. Refrigerate for at least 6 hours or until the shrimp has turned from translucent to opaque.
  5. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper to taste and top with chopped cilantro.

Paleo Tzatziki Sauce

Paleo Tzatziki Sauce | stupideasypaleo.com I’m on a dipping sauce kick lately…probably because they make food more fun. I love sauces for their ability to easily add another dimension of flavor to meals. A few weeks ago, I made a Paleo version of an Indian cucumber mint raita and knew that with a few simple tweaks, it would make a nice Tzatziki. [As an entertaining aside, I looked up how to pronounce this correctly, and The Google points to "cha-cheek-e"...which means I've been butchering it all these years].

Prep time: 10 min     Cook time: 0 min    Makes: ~1-1/2 cups

Ingredients for Paleo Tzatziki Sauce

  • 1 cup cucumber, seeded and shredded
  • 1/2 cup full-fat coconut milk*
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 2 Tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon dried dill (or 1 Tablespoon fresh dill)
  • 1/8 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon black pepper

*put a can of coconut milk in the fridge for about 24 hours prior to making the recipe

Paleo Tzatziki Sauce | stupideasypaleo.com

Directions for Paleo Tzatziki Sauce

  1. Peel, seed and shred a cucumber until you get enough to fill a 1 cup measure. Squeeze any extra moisture from the shredded cucumber.
  2. Open the can of coconut milk and scoop out 1/2 cup of the cream that’s on top.
  3. In a medium-sized bowl, combine the cucumber, coconut milk, garlic, lemon juice, dill, salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly to combine.
  4. If the sauce is too thick, you can add a bit of the clear coconut water from the bottom of the can to thin it out.
  5. Chill before serving. You can use this a sauce for meat like lamb or be a bit more out of the box and stir it into zucchini noodles.

Slow Cooker Caribbean Oxtails

Slow Cooker Caribbean Oxtails | stupideasypaleo.com What the heck is oxtail? Most of what we – and by we I mean Americans – call oxtail is actually tail sections from a cow. It contains a center bone and can be a bit fatty, but when cooked low and slow, the meat becomes super tender. Sounds like a perfect job for the crock pot though you could certainly braise these on the stove top instead.

Have I told you how much crock pots rule? Yes, I have, but it bears repeating: if you are strapped for time and think you don’t have the chance to cook,  a slow cooker is probably the single best use of $30-40 that I can think of. It’s the ultimate in lazy smart cooking because once the food goes in, you literally have to do nothing but wait. Win!

When I researched Caribbean recipes for oxtail, most of them had Paleo-unfriendly ingredients like flour or sugar. Ick. Instead, I’ve given you all the amazing flavor without any unsavory additions. This would be super tasty served over cauliflower rice. For an even *faster* version, eliminate steps 2-4 and just throw everything into the crock pot together. I think the extra couple minutes it takes to brown the meat is well worth it though.

If you can’t find oxtail, you could substitute stew meat instead.

Prep time: 15 min     Cook time: 6 hours    Makes: 2 lb of meat plus veggies

Ingredients for Slow Cooker Caribbean Oxtails

  • 2 lb (1 kg) beef oxtails
  • 2 onions, diced
  • 2 carrots, diced
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 inch piece of ginger, peeled and minced
  • 1 jalapeño pepper, minced (optional)
  • 2 cups beef stock, homemade or organic is best
  • 3 Tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 Tablespoon allspice berries (or 1 teaspoon ground allspice)
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce (I like Red Boat Fish Sauce)
  • 4 sprigs of fresh thyme (or 1 teaspoon dried thyme)
  • Coconut oil or fat of choice
  • Sea salt and pepper

Directions for Slow Cooker Caribbean Oxtails

  1. Prepare all the veggies: dice the onions and carrots. Mince the garlic and ginger. If using jalapeño pepper, you can remove some or all of the seeds and mince. If you like it spicy, you can keep the seeds or even add a hotter pepper such as habanero (Scotch bonnet).
  2. Heat a heavy-bottomed skillet over medium-high heat. Add a spoonful of coconut oil. Sprinkle the oxtails with salt and pepper. Brown them on all sides, and place them in the crock pot. 
  3. In the same skillet, add the onion, carrot, garlic, ginger and jalapeño. Cook over medium heat for 4-5 minutes.
  4. Add the beef stock, tomato paste, allspice berries, fish sauce and thyme. Use a wooden spoon or spatula to scrape up all the browned bits from the oxtail. If you want to get fancy, this is called deglazing the pan and the bits are called fond. Fun with cooking!
  5. Remove the pan from the heat and pour the contents into the crockpot to cover the oxtail.
  6. Cook on high for 6 hours.

Lamb Kofta (Meat on a Stick)

Lamb Kofta (Meat on a Stick) | stupideasypaleo.com Recently, I ate dinner at a restaurant that served Azerbaijani ground lamb on a skewer, and the taste exploded on my tongue. If you need a geography refresher, Azerbaijan is just to the east of Armenia (which is just to the east of Turkey). The meat was perfectly flavored and tender and let’s be honest…any kind of food on a stick is just more fun than the rest. I found myself on a mission to make something similar and ended up with a mashup of kofta – basically seasoned ground meat usually shaped into meatballs – and kebab.

I polled my Facebook readers (if you haven’t, go like my page now because I post up content that doesn’t make it onto my website…unashamed self-promotion!) to see if they’d prefer  lamb or beef in a recipe (this one) – and a majority said beef. Kofta can come in many variations with different ground meats, so I decided to make mine with a mixture of lamb and beef. To be honest, ground lamb straight up is too strong for my tastebuds! If you wanted, you could do all beef, all lamb or something else.

If you don’t have skewers, you could make these into meatballs or even burger patties. Let your creativity and your tastebuds be your guide…no need to be fussy! I served mine with two dipping sauces – a Paleo version of an Indian raita and a lemony herb sauce. Both were super damn tasty but are in no way mandatory.

Prep time: 20 min     Cook time: 15-20 min    Makes: ~12

Ingredients for Lamb Kofta (Meat on a Stick)

  • 1-1/2 lb ground lamb (I used half lamb / half beef)
  • 1/2 cup onion, minced
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 Tbsp mint leaves, chopped
  • 1 Tbsp flat-leaf parsley, chopped
  • 2 tsp paprika
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • 2 tsp coriander seeds (or 1 tsp ground coriander)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger

Directions for Lamb Kofta (Meat on a Stick)

  1. Soak 24 bamboo skewers in water for at least 6 hours.
  2. Preheat the oven to 350F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil or parchment paper.
  3. Combine the ground beef with the onion, garlic, salt, herbs and spices in a large bowl. Mix well with your hands to distribute the ingredients.
  4. Shape the meat into sausage-sized cylinders around two skewers (about 1/3 cup meat per skewer). Place in a single layer on the baking sheet.
  5. Bake for 15-20 minutes or until the meat is cooked through but not overdone. You could also grill the skewers.
  6. Serve with lemon herb sauce or Paleo cucumber mint raita for dipping.

Garlic Pistachio Broccoli Rabe

Garlic Pistachio Broccoli Rabe | stupideasypaleo.com

Before we dive into this recipe, let’s learn a little bit about this misunderstood vegetable: broccoli rabe (pronounced like “rob”) isn’t actually broccoli at all! Rather, it’s closely related to mustard greens. It’s also commonly called rapini in Italian cuisine. So confusing, right? I saw broccoli rabe hiding among the other greens in the organic section of the market and couldn’t resist the urge to try something new. My curiosity was rewarded because it was damn tasty!

This unassuming veggie can be bitter but when blanched – boiled quickly and then plunged into icy cold water – the unappealing bitterness is removed. If you can’t find broccoli rabe, or if you’re just too chicken to try something new, you can substitute it with virtually any dark leafy green like swiss chard, mustard greens or spinach (no need to blanch those options).

Prep time: 5 min     Cook time: 10 min    Makes: 2 cups

Ingredients for Garlic Pistachio Broccoli Rabe

  • 1 large bunch (about 1 lb. / 500 g) of broccoli rabe (rapini)
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 Tbsp chopped pistachio nuts
  • 2 Tbsp dried currants
  • 1/8 tsp red pepper flakes (optional)
  • 1/2 cup chicken stock (or water)
  • Olive oil
  • Sea salt, to taste

Directions for Garlic Pistachio Broccoli Rabe

  1. Boil a large pot of water. Set up a large bowl filled with ice water.
  2. While the water comes to a boil, trim the ends off the broccoli rabe and chop into wide strips, mince the garlic and chop the pistachios.
  3. Blanch the broccoli rabe in boiling water for 2 minutes. Immediately transfer to the ice water and allow to cool for a few minutes. Drain.
  4. Heat a large skillet over medium heat, and add a glug of olive oil. Saute the garlic, pistachios, currants and red pepper flakes for 1 minute, stirring constantly.
  5. Add the drained broccoli rabe and chicken stock, cooking for 3-4 more minutes or until the stems are tender. Adjust the seasoning with sea salt if necessary.

Butternut Squash Lasagna

Butternut Squash Lasagna | stupideasypaleo.com Disclaimer: nothing can take the place of real noodles.

I know – le sigh.

However, if you’re willing to put that aside, this recipe is pretty awesome and will get you close to a lasagna-like dish without any gluten or dairy. Win! I’m currently back in Scotland visiting, and a trip to the local Tesco to get ingredients left me with zero options for pre-made sauce that did not contain any excess sugar, so I looked around and gathered some staples to make my own. If you can find a clean pasta sauce, by all means go ahead and use that which means you’ll save time and omit the tomato sauce, paste, and oregano. I also used lean ground pork, but beef or lamb or a combo of different meats would be tasty as well.

Prep time: 20 min     Cook time: 30 min    Makes: 6-8 servings, one 13″ x 9″ dish or two 9″ round dishes

Ingredients for Butternut Squash Lasagna

  • 2 medium or 1 large butternut squash
  • 1 pound (500 g) lean ground beef or pork
  • ~36 oz canned tomato sauce (1000 g Italian passata for my UK friends)
  • 4 oz (100 g) tomato paste
  • 1 onion, diced finely
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 cup sliced olives
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 4 eggs, beaten
  • Salt & pepper
  • Coconut oil or fat of choice

Directions for Butternut Squash Lasagna

  1. Preheat the oven to 400F (200C).
  2. In a large pot over medium heat, sauté the diced onion in a spoonful of coconut oil until it’s softened, about 5 minutes. Add the pork, garlic and oregano and raise the heat to medium-high. Saute until the pork is cooked through.
  3. Add the olives, tomato sauce and paste. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Turn heat to low and simmer while you prepare the squash. [Note: this makes a tasty meat sauce all on its own or for use in other recipes.]
  4. Peel the butternut squash. Slice into very thin rounds by laying the squash on a cutting board. I tried to make mine about 1/8″ thick. The key is to make the slices as uniform as possible so they cook evenly. You could also use a mandolin to make them evenly sized. Be sure you have a sharp knife! Other recipes call for the squash to be sliced lengthwise into long sheets but this is very hard to do with a knife. The rounds enable quicker prep time and the result is just as tasty.
  5. Now it’s time to prepare the lasagna: start with a bit of sauce to cover the bottom of the dish. Then place the squash in a single layer (I used small pieces from the bottom of the squash, which I had to cut into half moons to remove the seeds, to fill in the gaps between the rounds). Now add another layer of sauce. Don’t skimp because the moisture from the sauce is what cooks the squash. Now add about 1/3 of the scrambled egg and smear it around. It will look gross. Stay the path. It’s going to taste awesome and gives the appearance of cheese.
  6. Repeat the squash-sauce-egg sequence one or two more times, depending on how much you have left (I used two 9″ round pans so each ended up with two layers).
  7. Finish with a light layer of sauce. I also used up some of the extra pieces of squash as decoration. Fancy :)
  8. Bake for about 25-30 minutes or until a knife easily pierces the squash.

Shrimp with Garlic and Artichokes

Shrimp with Garlic and Artichokes | stupideasypaleo.com I absolutely love shrimp. There. Confession. What I don’t love is cleaning all the icky shells off and taking the vein out, but it’s a small price to pay for these delicious little morsels. I usually look for wild-caught shrimp when it’s on sale and try to avoid farmed when I can, but that’s just personal preference. This would be pretty tasty served with roasted spaghetti squash!

Prep time: 10 min     Cook time: 5 min    Makes: 1 pound

Ingredients for Shrimp with Garlic and Artichokes

  • 1 pound (500 g) shrimp, any size, shelled and deveined
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup canned artichoke hearts, chopped
  • 1-2 Tbsp capers
  • Black pepper to taste
  • Coconut oil or fat of choice

Directions for Shrimp with Garlic and Artichokes

  1. Shell and devein the shrimp. Set aside.
  2. Mince the garlic and chop up the artichoke hearts.
  3. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat and add a spoonful of coconut oil or your fat of choice. Saute the shrimp until it begins to turn opaque.
  4. Add the garlic, artichokes and capers and continue cooking until the shrimp is cooked through.
  5. Season with pepper to taste.

Indian Pineapple Cauliflower Rice

Indian Pineapple Cauliflower Rice | stupideasypaleo.com A couple weeks back, I went to an Oscar party with the wonderful folks from Invictus and had to think of an Oscar-themed dish to bring along. Originally, I was joking around with Tiger Burgers (a nod to Life of Pi and Richard Parker) but then I kept thinking Pi-neapple. The idea for Life of Pi-neapple Indian Rice was born.

I modified a recipe by the amazing Melissa Joulwan of Well Fed, and what I brought is the result. It looks a lot like curry rice…so realistic in fact that when I asked my pal Amy if she’d tried it, she said no because she’d thought it was real rice. The currants and cinnamon give a hint of sweet and spicy while the cilantro adds a nice fresh flavor. The batch easily doubles to serve more hungry bellies or just to have for leftovers. Pairs really well with chicken and shrimp.

Prep time: 10-15 min     Cook time: 15 min    Makes: 3-4 side dish servings

Ingredients for Indian Pineapple Cauliflower Rice

  • 1 head of cauliflower
  • 1/4 of a fresh pineapple (or 1/2 cup unsweetened canned pineapple)
  • 1/2 of an onion
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1/4 cup sliced almonds
  • 1/4 cup dried currants
  • 1 Tbsp curry powder
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 large handful of cilantro
  • Coconut oil or fat of choice
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions for Indian Pineapple Cauliflower Rice

  1. Rice the cauliflower in a food processor. Set aside.
  2. Dice the pineapple into small pieces (hint: big chunks are fine but cutting it to a smaller size is a bit more appealing visually).
  3. Dice the onion and garlic finely. Chop the cilantro.
  4. In a large skillet over medium heat, melt a large spoonful of coconut oil.  Saute the onions until softened, about 5 minutes. Add in the garlic, almonds, currants, curry powder and cinnamon. Stir until combined well.
  5. Increase the heat to medium-high, add another spoonful of coconut oil and dump in the cauliflower. Cook for a few minutes, stirring frequently, until it’s softened but not mushy.
  6. Remove from the heat and stir in the pineapple and cilantro. Check flavor and add salt / pepper to taste.