Tag Archives: gluten free

Moules et Frites—Mussels & Fries

Moules et Frites—Mussels & Fries | stupideasypaleo.com

Moules et Frites (or Mussels & Fries) is one of my favorite appetizer-style dishes that seems so fancy, but is quite simple to make. Sometimes when I can get local mussels for a good deal, I’ll make a big batch and eat the whole thing, but this can easily be split among two people as an appetizer or with a big salad for a light dinner.

I make my version of Moules et Frites with a little bit of hard apple cider because it compliments the sweetness of the mussels, but you could just as easily use a splash of white wine or chicken broth. The secret to sweet potato fries that aren’t soggy is to cut them very thin like I did below. Give them some breathing room and spread them in a single layer on the baking sheet so they roast instead of steam.

Moules et Frites—Mussels & Fries | stupideasypaleo.com

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Moules et Frites—Mussels & Fries
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
 
Ingredients
  • 1 lb (454 g) sweet potatoes, peeled
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) ghee or coconut oil
  • ¼ tsp sea salt
  • ¼ tsp black pepper
  • 1-1/2 lb (680 g) mussels
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) ghee
  • 1 medium shallot, chopped finely
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped finely
  • ¼ cup (59 mL) hard cider*
  • 2 strips crispy bacon, chopped or 2 tbsp chopped salami**, for garnish
  • Handful chopped parsley, for garnish
Instructions
  1. First, get the sweet potato fries going. You can also omit these and just make the mussels which will cut the cooking time down by a lot. Preheat the oven to 400F (204C), and line a baking sheet with aluminum foil or parchment paper.
  2. Cut the sweet potatoes into thin sticks (about the size of regular French fries), then put them on the sheet and toss with the ghee, salt and pepper. Spread them into a single layer and bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until lightly browned. Stir at least once during baking so they brown evenly.
  3. While the sweet potato fries are baking, prep the mussels. Wash the mussels with fresh water and discard any that are open or cracked. You might need to remove the beard: It's that scraggly looking bit of stuff that's hanging outside the shell. To do that, gently pull toward the wider end of the shell. Set the mussels aside.
  4. In a large skillet over medium heat, add the ghee. Then, add the shallot and garlic and cook it for about a minute, until it starts to smell amazing. Toss in the mussels and the hard cider, then increase the heat to medium-high and cover. Bring to a boil and cook for about 5 minutes or until the mussels open and release their liquid.
  5. Serve the mussels in a big bowl with the broth, and garnish with crispy bacon / salami and parsley. Serve the fries on the side. I like to dip mine in the broth along the way.
Notes
or use chicken broth or white wine
*I like Creminelli Fine Meats, found at Whole Foods
Nutrition Information
Serving size: Serves 2

Moules et Frites—Mussels & Fries | stupideasypaleo.com

Moules et Frites—Mussels & Fries | stupideasypaleo.com

Moules et Frites—Mussels & Fries | stupideasypaleo.com

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Moules et Frites—Mussels & Fries | stupideasypaleo.com

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4 Paleo Swaps for Pasta & Rice

4 Paleo Swaps for Pasta & Rice | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo swaps for pasta and rice can really help ease your transition into this way of eating. When you first go Paleo, it can be challenging to construct grain-free meals particularly when pasta or rice were staples of your diet.

Luckily, there are some easy Paleo swaps you can use to replicate the “feel” of these foods. While they won’t always be the same flavor or texture, once your taste buds adjust, you’ll probably find you end up enjoying these swaps just as much. Bonus: Using veggies to sub for grains and other starches significantly bumps up the nutrient content of your meals.

Paleo Swap for Pasta: Zucchini Noodles

Zucchini noodles or “zoodles” are probably my favorite pasta substitute because they’re mild in flavor and really simple to make. Probably the biggest complaint, though, is that they can get watery when cooked, but there’s a simple solution.

To prevent water-logged zucchini noodles, salt the zoodles after you make them but before cooking. Here’s how to do it:

  • Place the zoodles in a colander. Sprinkle liberally with sea salt.
  • Place the colander in the sink or over a large bowl because liquid will be pulled from the zoodles.
  • After 15 to 20 minutes, rinse very well with fresh water. Then, gently squeeze any excess moisture from the noodles. Use raw or cooked.

How do you make zoodles? There are two basic methods: using a julienne peeler or a spiralizer. I prefer the julienne peeler for a few reasons: the noodles are “finer,” and the peeler is inexpensive and small. Lots of folks love the spiralizer because it’s faster. Either way, both will work. You can also make noodles from several other veggies such as sweet potatoes or beets.

Here’s a video of how Mel from The Clothes Make the Girl makes her zucchini noodles.

Suggested recipes: Cold Zucchini Noodle Salad with Tomatoes and Olives, Paleo Noodle Bowl

Paleo Swap for Pasta: Spaghetti Squash

Spaghetti squash also has a fantastic noodly texture and while it doesn’t taste like a plain noodle made from flour, it’s a very common swap in Paleo cooking. Once you bake the squash, you use a fork to loosen the innards into long strings, a texture unlike any other squash you’ve probably ever had. There are a few ways to prepare spaghetti squash, but my favorite is to roast it.

To do that, preheat the oven to 400°F (204°C), and line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper. With a sharp knife, slice a small section off the squash so it won’t roll around the cutting board. Then, slice the squash in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. (They’re actually dynamite when roasted separately with some salt and pepper.) Lay the halves cut side up, drizzle with oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast for about 45 minutes, then let cool. Scrape up the “noodles” with a fork.

You can also microwave it, cut side down on a plate with a little bit of water until tender, 10+ minutes. Or, if you’re brave, you can poke a LOT of holes in it and microwave it whole. I can’t really recommend that method though, because I had a spaghetti squash burst that way once. The clean up is not fun.

Suggested recipe: Paleo Chicken Florentine Spaghetti Squash

Paleo Swap for Rice: Cauliflower “Rice”

Okay, so this usually still tastes a bit like cauliflower, but the texture is very similar to rice provided it’s not overcooked or raw. Once I even fooled people at a party: My Paleo friend avoided trying my dish because she thought it was actual rice. The great part is that it’s a really blank canvas that you can add so many flavors to: Asian, Indian and Mexican are my favorites.

Cauli “rice” is relatively easy to prepare if you have a food processor. First, core it, and cut into large florets. Then, you can use a shredding blade (easiest) or use a regular blade and pulse it in small batches until it’s roughly the size of rice grains. If you don’t have a food processor, you can fill a blender pitcher with water, add chunks of cauliflower and whir it for several seconds until the pieces are small, then drain in a fine mesh strainer. I’ve never personally tried that method, but many people use it and say it works well.

I found the key to making great cauli “rice” is to cook it over high temperature and relatively fast. (Think of stir frying.) That way, the cauliflower doesn’t have a chance to get soggy. If chopped slightly smaller than rice grains, cauliflower can act as a replacement for cous cous.

Suggested recipes: Indian Pineapple Cauliflower Rice, Paleo Caramelized Onion Cauliflower “Cous Cous”

Paleo Swap for Pasta: Kelp or Mountain Yam Noodles

While not my top choice for a gluten-free noodle, kelp or mountain yam noodles are pretty neutral in flavor and even closer to the texture of actual noodles. Generally, they’re not super nutrient dense (certainly not as much as veggies), but they are pretty low in carbohydrate. For an every-once-in-a-while addition to soup, they’re probably fine, but I wouldn’t make them a daily indulgence because, well, there’s not much redeeming to them.

Where to find kelp noodles or mountain yam noodles? The refrigerated section of natural grocers (such as Whole Foods or Sprouts) near the tofu. Remember to rinse them before use.

Suggested recipes: Healing Chicken Soup, Paleo Fresh Spring Rolls

What About Other Gluten-Free Noodles?

Nowadays, the gluten-free foods section of your market is bound to contain noodles made of various gluten-free starches such as rice, tapioca, potato, quinoa, corn, etc. Some things to consider: Some of these foods are generally avoided in Paleo, and when compared to vegetables (like making zoodles), these noodles are far less nutrient dense. Also, some may contain proteins that are still problematic for folks with gluten sensitivity.

Optimizing nutrient intake and consuming enough vegetable matter is a hallmark of Paleo eating, so choosing veggie noodles or cauli “rice” is my best recommendation.

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4 Paleo Swaps for Pasta & Rice | stupideasypaleo.com

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Slow Cooker Thai Beef Stew—Plus a Chance to Win Meals Made Simple

Paleo Slow Cooker Thai Beef Stew | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: Today’s recipe is a sneak peek from Danielle Walker’s new book, “Meals Made Simple” which releases on September 2, 2014. I’ve been lucky to preview the cookbook, and it’s amazing…great for newbie cooks or anyone who just enjoys simple, delicious food. Danielle notes: “Jicama may seem like a strange ingredient to add to this dish, but it provides a slight crunch similar to that of water chestnuts or bamboo shoots and adds a mildly sweet flavor.” Serve with cauliflower rice (pictured).

Slow Cooker Thai Beef Stew
Prep time: 
Total time: 
Serves: Serves 6 to 8
 
Ingredients
  • 2 Tablespoons coconut oil, divided
  • 3 pounds beef stew meat, trimmed of fat
  • 1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons peeled and minced fresh ginger
  • 1 (13½-ounce) can full-fat coconut milk
  • ⅓ cup tomato paste
  • ½ cup Thai red curry paste
  • 2 Tablespoons fish sauce
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lime juice
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 2 cups broccoli florets
  • 2 cups julienned carrots
  • 1 cup peeled and julienned jicama*
  • Fresh cilantro, for garnish
Instructions
  1. Heat 1 tablespoon of the coconut oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Working in batches, brown the meat on all sides.
  2. Use a slotted spoon to transfer each batch of browned meat directly to the slow cooker, then continue browning. Wipe out the skillet between batches if a lot of liquid has accumulated at the bottom to ensure even browning.
  3. Wipe out the skillet and add the remaining 1 tablespoon of coconut oil. Sauté the onion, garlic, and ginger over medium-high heat for 5 minutes.
  4. Pour in the coconut milk and stir continuously to release the browned bits on the bottom of the pan.
  5. Add the tomato paste, curry paste, fish sauce, lime juice, and salt, then pour the mixture over the beef in the slow cooker.
  6. Cook on high for 5 hours or low for 8 hours. Add the broccoli, carrots, and jicama during the last 30 minutes if cooking on high, or the last hour if cooking on low. Serve garnished with cilantro.
Notes
*Omit for SCD

Stretch It

The leftover meat tastes fabulous in scrambled eggs!

Make-Ahead Tip

Prepare Steps 1 through 5, then place the contents in an airtight container or bag. Freeze for up to 3 months, then thaw overnight in the refrigerator

The giveaway is now closed. Congratulations to the winner, Julia B. at a*****9@gmail.com!

To enter for a chance to win a free copy of “Meals Made Simple!

Use the Rafflecopter widget below to finalize your entry and unlock other bonus entries! (This is how the winner will be drawn, so don’t skip this step!)

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The contest ends August 10, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. PT, and the winner will be announced here on the blog by August 12, 2014. Be sure to check back to see if you won!

The winner will be emailed and will have 48 hours to confirm back with his or her full name, address, and phone number to claim the prize. Open to US residents only.

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Paleo Slow Cooker Thai Beef Stew | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Baked Avocado Fries

Paleo Baked Avocado Fries | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Baked Avocado Fries are a deliciously different way to enjoy this healthy fat source in your diet.

This appetizer was inspired by a dish the hubs and I enjoyed at a local cafe. While their version was gluten-free, I’m pretty certain they used rice flour and deep fried them. Convinced I could do better, I took some time off from shooting pics for The Performance Paleo Cookbook and developed these delectable little snacks. My first experiment worked! (These are also reminiscent of Fed and Fit’s brilliant guest post for Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers.)

Basically, you’ll coat the avocado “fries” with crushed pork rinds. They bake up brown and crisp! I like this brand the best because it’s just pork, olive oil and salt already crushed up and ready to use. You’ll coat the avocado in arrowroot (tapioca) flour, egg wash, and finally seasoned pork rinds, then bake and eat. If you have Flavor God seasonings, just sub the spices in this recipe for 2 Tablespoons of any variety.

If you can’t eat eggs, I made a version without. Though I don’t have exact quantities, all I did was replace the egg with stone-ground mustard that I thinned with a little water. The result was just as tasty.

Ingredients for Paleo Baked Avocado Fries

Serves 2 to 4.

Directions for Paleo Baked Avocado Fries

  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F (218°C), and line a baking sheet with foil.
  2. Slice the avocados in half, and carefully remove the pit. (To do that, place the avocado on a cutting board, and gently but firmly thwack the pit with a knife, then twist.) Cut each half into three or four slices, and set them aside.
  3. You’ll need three small bowls for the dipping stations. In the first, combine the arrowroot and half the seasonings. In the second, combine the beaten egg, water and mustard. In the third, combine the pork rinds and the other half of the seasonings.
  4. Dip the avocado slices into the arrowroot, then the eggs, then the pork rinds. Lay them on the baking sheet. When they’re all dipped, bake the avocado fries for 10 to 12 minutes, then flip and bake another 2 to 4 minutes. They’re best enjoyed while they’re fresh!

*Tip: To select avocados that aren’t overripe, flick off the stem. If it’s white / green underneath, you still have time before it’s mushy and brown. If it’s brown, avoid.

Paleo Baked Avocado Fries | stupideasypaleo.com

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Paleo Baked Avocado Fries | stupideasypaleo.com

Questions? Leave a comment below, and I’ll get back to you!

Simple Braised Root Veggies

Simple Braised Root Veggies | stupideasypaleo.com

Simple braised root veggies are so easy to make, and they’re an inexpensive way to round out a meal. The leftovers keep well and find their way into my breakfast scrambles or even my post-workout snack. This dish is hearty and warming in the winter, a perfect way to take advantage of all the root veggies lying around as we really hit the cold months. And, this recipe is Whole30-friendly.

If you want to customize this, look at the bottom of the post for suggestions to change it up, but once you dial in the technique, the sky’s the limit. You’ll be braising the veggies, which basically means to develop a bit of brown, caramelly goodness when it first hits the pan, add liquid and simmer until tender, then raise the heat back up to cook off most of the liquid and concentration the flavors. No Dutch oven or similar cooking vessel? I’ve done this in a large frying pan with a lid, and it works just fine. One tip: don’t season with salt until the end if your broth is salted because will concentrate during cooking.

Ingredients for Simple Braised Root Veggies:

  • 1–2 Tablespoons ghee or coconut oil
  • 2 large carrots
  • 2 large parsnips
  • 1 small celery root (celeriac) or 1 small rutabaga, peeled
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 Tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh sage
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste

Directions for Simple Braised Root Veggies:

  1. If desired, peel the carrots and parsnips. Cut in half lengthwise and then into ~1/4″ thick pieces. Peel the celery root and cut into similar-sized pieces to the carrot and parsnip. If you make the pieces too thin, you’ll end up with a pot of mush.
  2. In a large, heavy bottomed pot, like a Dutch oven, heat the ghee or coconut oil over medium-high heat. Toss in the carrots, parsnips, celery root and onion. Allow the veggies to caramelize and slightly brown, though not burn. Stir enough so you get good color on many of the pieces.
  3. Add the garlic, rosemary, thyme, sage and chicken broth. Allow the liquid to come to a boil, then reduce the heat to low. Cover the pot. Allow the veggies to cook until just fork-tender, about 20 minutes.
  4. Uncover the pot. Turn the heat to high and allow the braising liquid to reduce down until it’s a slightly thickened sauce. Don’t let it go too long or walk away because this can very quickly start to burn the bottom of the veggies.
  5. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper.

Change It Up:

  • No Dutch oven? You can accomplish the same result in a large frying pan with a tightly fitting lid.
  • No fresh herbs? Instead of 1 Tablespoon fresh herbs, use 1 teaspoon dried. Rub the herbs between your fingers before adding to the pot to unleash more flavor.
  • Use whatever root veggies you have in any combination you’d like.
  • Double the batch and use leftovers for morning hash.

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  Simple Braised Root Veggies | stupideasypaleo.com

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What’s your favorite root vegetable?

Top 10 Paleo Posts of 2013

Top 10 Paleo Posts of 2013 | stupideasypaleo.comHere we go…it’s the Top 10 Paleo Posts of 2013 from right here on the blog!

On Christmas Day at 3 p.m., it’s customary for Brits to watch the Queen give her annual holiday broadcast. (I’ve been in Scotland for the past two Christmases, and I can say, this time-honored tradition is taken pretty seriously!) Her message this year was about reflection which gave me pause to think about all the cool things that have happened with Stupid Easy Paleo this year.

In June, I launched the newly designed WordPress.org version of the blog. This meant I now had a fully functioning, completely capable platform to bring you all the best features for delivering recipes and articles. I also debuted the Easy Paleo Quickstart Mini-Course that month (formerly called the Easy Paleo Quickstart Guide) which has helped over 16,000 people to date get started learning about Paleo. June also marked my one year sabbatical from teaching to focus on building Stupid Easy Paleo into a better resource for you.

Since then, things have grown more than I ever imagined possible. Your support has meant so much to me: through blog comments and emails, the Facebook page and other social media, and purchasing courses and cookbooks and clicking on Amazon links so I can continue to keep the blog going…I’m continually motivated to bring you the best I can. Your letters and comments about how much Paleo has improved your life is nothing short of inspiring. Thank you sincerely for having me along as part of the journey.

As I look ahead to 2014, I’m excited about the great things I’ve got planned for you (my real-deal ebook, The Paleo Athlete, launches very soon), hitting the road with Whole9 for our Whole Athlete Seminar and so much more.

And so, to close out 2013, I bring you a quick recap of the top 10 Paleo posts from the blog!

The Top 5 Stupid Easy Paleo Recipes of 2013:

Simple Paleo Tortillas | stupideasypaleo.com Simple Paleo Tortillas. This was the sleeper hit of the year, concocted while FaceTiming my better half in Scotland about a week before I left the US for my trip. It’s proven to be ultra-popular because it’s one of the only gluten-free tortilla recipes I’ve seen that’s truly easy and yields a foldable, versatile product.

 

DSC_0197 Easy Pan-Fried Lemon Chicken. No grill? No problem. Keeping chicken breast moist while cooking is always a challenge, but this recipe always get the job done. Pound the chicken flat for even cooking, marinate and cook on high heat to seal in the juices.

 

 

DSC_0679 Homemade Kombucha. This has probably been the Paleo drink of the year. This post is a basic tutorial (recipe + video) showing you how to make it. If you’re intimidated by the process (which you shouldn’t be!), this is a simple way to get started. Of course, if you want me to show you in detail from start to finish, there’s always my Kombucha eClass.

 

DSC_0062 Dairy-Free Dark Chocolate Pudding. No dairy, no egg desserts are hard to come by in Paleo, but this four-ingredient treat makes a few lush bites without the extra added sugar or problematic ingredients. If you’re looking for an alternative that doesn’t use gelatin, check out the sister recipe for chia pudding here.

 

IMG_3760 Paleo Cabbage Rolls (aka Golumbki). I’m so surprised by this one being in the top five because I didn’t even think many people would know what they are! This is a Paleo-friendly variation on my Grandma’s cabbage rolls and a shout out to my Polish heritage. It makes a large batch and is finished right in the crock pot.

The Top 5 Stupid Easy Paleo Articles of 2013:

mini course 3 The Easy Paleo Quickstart Mini-Course. If you’re wondering what the heck Paleo’s all about and want a free way to learn more, this is exactly the thing for you. Over two weeks, the mini-course is delivered to your inbox. Super convenient. Zero risk.

 

 

1515012_10202329515426956_202370259_n Can Coffee Really Improve Your Health? Meet Bulletproof®. This is probably the other most popular Paleo drink of the year. While I do give a few recipes in this post, it’s also a full explanation of what Bulletproof® coffee is and why the heck people drink it to begin with.

 

Stupid Easy Paleo Guide to Clean-Eating Challenges | stupideasypaleo.com The Stupid Easy Paleo Whole30®. Back in July, I ran the first of what’s to be many Whole30s on the blog. In conjunction, I developed a video series and shared lots of clean recipes to make your experience even better. (Pssst…there’s another one—complete with my newest free Guide to Clean-Eating Challengesstarting January 1, 2014!)

 

Top 5 Paleo Mistakes Newbies Make | stupideasypaleo.com Top 5 Paleo Mistakes Newbies Make. This post is the product of working with my readers and also some personal experience throw into the mix. If you’re new to Paleo or you’re a veteran who isn’t seeing the results you did at first, definitely check this one out.

 

 

abs 3 Five Things You’re Overlooking in Your Quest for Abs. Despite its title, the overall message of this post is all about health first and foremost.

 

 

That’s a wrap! I’m eagerly looking forward to the upcoming year. Check back frequently as I’ll be posting at least three times a week, or better yet, sign up here to get new posts delivered right to your inbox.

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Top 10 Paleo Posts of 2013 | stupideasypaleo.com

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What are your final reflections on 2013? Share them in the comments below!

Simple Paleo Tortillas

Simple Paleo Tortillas | stupideasypaleo.comAre simple Paleo tortillas really possible?! If you’re looking for a really easy Paleo version of a flour tortilla – or a French crepe – look no further. These are pretty much foolproof and are much more flexible than other Paleo tortillas I’ve tried before that mostly use coconut flour as a base. I had a huge bag of arrowroot powder to use up (a gluten-free flour alternative) so this fit the bill quite well.

Simple Paleo Tortillas | stupideasypaleo.com

These Paleo tortillas hold up to folding or rolling and can be used in sweet or savory applications, and it’s easy to make a double or triple batch in advance and save them for upcoming meals. They’d also be perfect for making up some tasty lunches on the go, and I think they’d be super popular with kids (of all ages)!

Update: I tested these to see how well they’d freeze. I rolled the tortillas up, froze them, and they thawed flexible and easy to fold!

Makes: Three 8″ tortillas

Ingredients for Simple Paleo Tortillas

Directions for Simple Paleo Tortillas

  1. Crack the eggs into a medium-sized bowl and whisk in the melted ghee and water.
  2. Add the dry ingredients—arrowroot, coconut flour and salt—and beat well to combine.  Simple Paleo Tortillas | stupideasypaleo.com
  3. In a small (8″) skillet over medium heat, pour in about 1/3 of the batter and immediately roll it around to evenly coat the bottom. The tortilla should start to pull away from the edges as it cooks. Simple Paleo Tortillas | stupideasypaleo.com
  4. Cook for 1 minute on each side.
  5. If saving for later, cool completely and store in a plastic bag or airtight glass container. Simple Paleo Tortillas | stupideasypaleo.com Simple Paleo Tortillas | stupideasypaleo.com

Sweet Plantain “Buns”

DSC_0725

Trying to use up more of my pantry before I go on my big trip, and I was staring at the bottom of a bag of coconut flour and a ripe plantain so I decided to mix it together with an egg and a bit of leavening agent to see what I could make. The coconut flour gives it the density it needed to stand up to eating a grass-fed beef slider with my hands.

It’d be easy to double or triple this recipe. It yielded about 4 small / medium “bun” halves, enough for two sliders. It’s really important to use a blender or food processor to break this down so you don’t end up with a chunky batter. No pastry bag? Me neither. I used a ziplock bag with the corner cut off to pipe the buns into perfect(ish) circles.

Makes: 4 bun halves, enough for two sliders or small burgers

Ingredients for Sweet Plantain “Buns”

Directions for Sweet Plantain “Buns”

  1. In a food processor or blender, combine all the ingredients and process until it becomes a smooth batter.
  2. Load the batter into a ziplock bag. Cut off the corner. This is your pastry bag. Sweet Plantain Buns | stupideasypaleo.com Sweet Plantain Buns | stupideasypaleo.com
  3. In an oiled skillet (I used coconut oil), over medium low heat, pipe a circle of dough about the same size as your sliders or burgers. Cook for a couple minutes on each side or until cooked through.  Sweet Plantain Buns | stupideasypaleo.com
  4. I served mine as a slider with avocado, tomato, jalapeño sauerkraut and spinach.  Sweet Plantain Buns | stupideasypaleo.com

Everyone Has Skeletons…

…in their pantry.

I went on a purging mission today, peaking into the depths of my cupboards. Here’s what I found:

whuuuuuuuut?

Holy Gluten/Grain (and unhealthy fat), Batman! Into the trash they go. Not that I’ve even used any of this in AGES, but it just kind of blended into the background of my pantry.

Just a reminder to take a look at what remnants of an unhealthy diet (say “Sayonara” to grains and gluten as a start) may be lurking in the depths of your kitchen!