Tag Archives: paleo

Curried Kabocha Squash Soup—Paleo & Whole30

Curried Kabocha Squash Soup—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

Curried Kabocha Squash Soup is so stupid-easy to make with only five ingredients, and it’s the perfect way to celebrate my favorite fall squash. Kabocha—also called “buttercup” in other regions of the United States and simply “pumpkin” in other parts of the world—tastes like a mash up between butternut squash and sweet potato. It’s wonderfully tasty with a thin, edible skin, and it really shines when roasted. It’s recognizable by it’s mottled dark green skin and round shape.

Usually, I just slice it into semicircles and roast it in the oven. (The seeds are delicious roasted, too.) This time, though, I made a simple soup that’s the perfect accompaniment to any fall dinner. I think it’d pair really well with a basic roast chicken and a green salad. If you can’t find kabocha squash in your market, butternut makes a very good substitute.

Curried Kabocha Squash Soup—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

Curried Kabocha Squash Soup—Paleo & Whole30

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 50 minutes

Yield: Serves 3 to 4

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400F (204C) and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or aluminum foil.
  2. Cut the bottom and top off the squash, then carefully cut it in half from top to bottom. Scoop out the seeds (you can save them and roast them separately). Cut the squash into a few large chunks. Drizzle with the coconut oil and season with the salt and pepper. Roast the squash for 45-55 minutes or until it's tender and browned. You may want to flip the pieces halfway through cooking.
  3. Let the squash cool, and scoop the flesh away from the skin.
  4. Put the squash flesh into a high-powered blender along with the chicken broth, coconut milk, and curry powder. Blend for at least 15 seconds or until completely smooth.
  5. Pour into a medium pot to reheat, and adjust the seasoning with salt.

Notes

*If you have mild curry powder, it you may need 2 teaspoons or so. When in doubt, add 1 teaspoon, taste, then go from there. Substitute butternut squash instead of kabocha. This soup freezes well.

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Curried Kabocha Squash Soup—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

Curried Kabocha Squash Soup—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

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What’s your favorite fall soup? Let us know in the comments below!

4 Paleo Swaps for Pasta & Rice

4 Paleo Swaps for Pasta & Rice | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo swaps for pasta and rice can really help ease your transition into this way of eating. When you first go Paleo, it can be challenging to construct grain-free meals particularly when pasta or rice were staples of your diet.

Luckily, there are some easy Paleo swaps you can use to replicate the “feel” of these foods. While they won’t always be the same flavor or texture, once your taste buds adjust, you’ll probably find you end up enjoying these swaps just as much. Bonus: Using veggies to sub for grains and other starches significantly bumps up the nutrient content of your meals.

Paleo Swap for Pasta: Zucchini Noodles

Zucchini noodles or “zoodles” are probably my favorite pasta substitute because they’re mild in flavor and really simple to make. Probably the biggest complaint, though, is that they can get watery when cooked, but there’s a simple solution.

To prevent water-logged zucchini noodles, salt the zoodles after you make them but before cooking. Here’s how to do it:

  • Place the zoodles in a colander. Sprinkle liberally with sea salt.
  • Place the colander in the sink or over a large bowl because liquid will be pulled from the zoodles.
  • After 15 to 20 minutes, rinse very well with fresh water. Then, gently squeeze any excess moisture from the noodles. Use raw or cooked.

How do you make zoodles? There are two basic methods: using a julienne peeler or a spiralizer. I prefer the julienne peeler for a few reasons: the noodles are “finer,” and the peeler is inexpensive and small. Lots of folks love the spiralizer because it’s faster. Either way, both will work. You can also make noodles from several other veggies such as sweet potatoes or beets.

Here’s a video of how Mel from The Clothes Make the Girl makes her zucchini noodles.

Suggested recipes: Cold Zucchini Noodle Salad with Tomatoes and Olives, Paleo Noodle Bowl

Paleo Swap for Pasta: Spaghetti Squash

Spaghetti squash also has a fantastic noodly texture and while it doesn’t taste like a plain noodle made from flour, it’s a very common swap in Paleo cooking. Once you bake the squash, you use a fork to loosen the innards into long strings, a texture unlike any other squash you’ve probably ever had. There are a few ways to prepare spaghetti squash, but my favorite is to roast it.

To do that, preheat the oven to 400°F (204°C), and line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper. With a sharp knife, slice a small section off the squash so it won’t roll around the cutting board. Then, slice the squash in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. (They’re actually dynamite when roasted separately with some salt and pepper.) Lay the halves cut side up, drizzle with oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast for about 45 minutes, then let cool. Scrape up the “noodles” with a fork.

You can also microwave it, cut side down on a plate with a little bit of water until tender, 10+ minutes. Or, if you’re brave, you can poke a LOT of holes in it and microwave it whole. I can’t really recommend that method though, because I had a spaghetti squash burst that way once. The clean up is not fun.

Suggested recipe: Paleo Chicken Florentine Spaghetti Squash

Paleo Swap for Rice: Cauliflower “Rice”

Okay, so this usually still tastes a bit like cauliflower, but the texture is very similar to rice provided it’s not overcooked or raw. Once I even fooled people at a party: My Paleo friend avoided trying my dish because she thought it was actual rice. The great part is that it’s a really blank canvas that you can add so many flavors to: Asian, Indian and Mexican are my favorites.

Cauli “rice” is relatively easy to prepare if you have a food processor. First, core it, and cut into large florets. Then, you can use a shredding blade (easiest) or use a regular blade and pulse it in small batches until it’s roughly the size of rice grains. If you don’t have a food processor, you can fill a blender pitcher with water, add chunks of cauliflower and whir it for several seconds until the pieces are small, then drain in a fine mesh strainer. I’ve never personally tried that method, but many people use it and say it works well.

I found the key to making great cauli “rice” is to cook it over high temperature and relatively fast. (Think of stir frying.) That way, the cauliflower doesn’t have a chance to get soggy. If chopped slightly smaller than rice grains, cauliflower can act as a replacement for cous cous.

Suggested recipes: Indian Pineapple Cauliflower Rice, Paleo Caramelized Onion Cauliflower “Cous Cous”

Paleo Swap for Pasta: Kelp or Mountain Yam Noodles

While not my top choice for a gluten-free noodle, kelp or mountain yam noodles are pretty neutral in flavor and even closer to the texture of actual noodles. Generally, they’re not super nutrient dense (certainly not as much as veggies), but they are pretty low in carbohydrate. For an every-once-in-a-while addition to soup, they’re probably fine, but I wouldn’t make them a daily indulgence because, well, there’s not much redeeming to them.

Where to find kelp noodles or mountain yam noodles? The refrigerated section of natural grocers (such as Whole Foods or Sprouts) near the tofu. Remember to rinse them before use.

Suggested recipes: Healing Chicken Soup, Paleo Fresh Spring Rolls

What About Other Gluten-Free Noodles?

Nowadays, the gluten-free foods section of your market is bound to contain noodles made of various gluten-free starches such as rice, tapioca, potato, quinoa, corn, etc. Some things to consider: Some of these foods are generally avoided in Paleo, and when compared to vegetables (like making zoodles), these noodles are far less nutrient dense. Also, some may contain proteins that are still problematic for folks with gluten sensitivity.

Optimizing nutrient intake and consuming enough vegetable matter is a hallmark of Paleo eating, so choosing veggie noodles or cauli “rice” is my best recommendation.

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4 Paleo Swaps for Pasta & Rice | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question or comment? Leave it in the comments below!

Beet and Brussels Sprout Salad

Beet and Brussels Sprout Salad | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: This recipe is a sneak preview of Cindy Sexton’s upcoming book “Paleo Takes 5 – Or Fewer: Healthy Eating was Never Easier with These Delicious 3, 4 and 5 Ingredient Recipes.” Cindy’s come up with a cookbook full of stupid-easy recipes with 3, 4 or 5 ingredients perfect for beginning chefs or those who like to KISS (Keep It Super Simple). Note: spices, vinegars and salts are not included in the recipe ingredient total. Paleo Takes 5 – Or Fewer releases on October 21, 2014 but you can still pre-order and snag the early bird price that saves you 24%!

I need to preface by saying that this is one spectacular little number. It could easily pose as a main for lunch or act as a superior side dish for a larger spread. The birth of this recipe began one day while strolling the farmers market. After spotting a bushel of Brussels sprouts at a vendor’s booth, and some beautiful heirloom beets at another, I decided to come up with a dish that would combine the two. Ironically, I thought of uniting one of my all-time faves, beets, with something I had (at that point) never EVER tried before, Brussels sprouts.

To put this dish over the edge, I knew it would be ideal to cook up some bacon in the oven first and then roast the beets, garlic and Brussels sprouts in the fat afterward. Two words: dynamite decision. After slow roasting, everything caramelizes together to make one huge mound of goodness. It creates an earthy and nutty sauce within itself. Every bite gives you a savory crunch that will appeal to your taste buds and leave you wanting more.

Beet and Brussels Sprout Salad

Yield: Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 lb (454 g) bacon
  • 6 beets, cubed into small pieces
  • About 24 (individual) Brussels sprouts, cleaned thoroughly (these guys can be dirty!)
  • 4 cloves fresh garlic, quartered
  • 1 tbsp (4 g) dried thyme
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 cup (62 g) pistachios, once cooked, and toasted

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F (176°C).
  2. Arrange slices of bacon on a baking sheet lined with aluminum foil and bake for about 20 minutes in the oven until crispy. When done, remove with tongs and set aside on a plate to cool. Reserve the bacon fat for cooking the vegetables.
  3. In a large roasting pan, add in the beets, Brussels sprouts and garlic. Drizzle with leftover bacon fat. Sprinkle with dried thyme, salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly using the tongs. Roast in the oven on the middle rack for about 45 minutes until everything has caramelized slightly.
  4. In the meantime, toast pistachios in a small pan over medium heat on the stovetop. Transfer contents of the roasting pan to a large bowl and top with pistachios. Crumble the cooled bacon and add it to the veggies. Use tongs to toss it all together.

Notes

Brussels sprouts are an excellent source of vitamin K and C.

Pistachios are an excellent source of copper and vitamin B6. They are also a very good source of iron, manganese, phosphorus, vitamin B1 and B5 as well as a good source of magnesium.

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Want to check out more of Paleo Takes 5 – Or Fewer? Go here and click on Look Inside.

Photo courtesy: Page Street Publishing

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Beet and Brussels Sprout Salad | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a recipe question for Cindy? Leave it in the comments below!

Join Us On a Thai Culinary Adventure!

Culinary Adventure in Thailand | stupideasypaleo.com

Nick Massie of Paleo Nick and I are teaming up for a one-week cultural and culinary adventure in Chiang Mai, Thailand…and we want YOU there!

Spend 7 days / 6 nights in gorgeous Chiang Mai, experiencing the culture and cuisine that makes this area of the world famous. You’ll participate in two cooking classes, tour local open-air markets, and soak up all the Thai culture you can possibly handle.

Here are the details…

Where?

Chiang Mai, Thailand and surrounding area.

***There is an option to fly into Bangkok a day early and take the train to Chiang Mai. You will also return to Bangkok via train at the end of the trip. This option adds two days to your trip and $200, but saves up to $500 on air travel.

When?

November 5-11th, 2014 (or November 4th – 12th if you choose the Bangkok add-on)

How much?

$1,249.00 all-inclusive

$1,449.00 all-inclusive with Bangkok add-on

When do I need to pay?

To book your spot, you must submit a deposit of $500.00. The balance will be due on or before October 15th.

Click here to pay your deposit and reserve your spot ($500.00):

Thailand Pay Now

Click here to pay in full for the Chiang Mai option ($1,249.00):

Thailand Pay Now

Click here to pay in full for the Bangkok option ($1,449.00):

Thailand Pay Now

Chiang Mai Night Bazaar

What is included?

- All transportation once on the ground in Thailand.

- Breakfast, lunch and dinner with a few exceptions. Breakfast is provided at the hotel each morning. However,while traveling on the train, at markets in the evening and on free day, you will be responsible for your own meals. Food is very inexpensive in Thailand. You can get an amazing meal for $5.00.

- Two days of Thai cooking school. These will take place on the 6th and 9th from 10:00 to 16:00. We will visit the market and learn to prepare six Thai dishes each day.

- Day Trip to Patara Elephant Farm. Click here for this day’s itinerary. Click here for tons of pics of Nom Nom Paleo’s experience there last fall.

- Day Trip to Flight of the Gibbon Rainforest Adventure where we’ll soar on a zipline through lush, ancient rainforest that is recognized as the most beautiful in all of Thailand.

- One ninety-minute Thai Massage.

- Two CrossFit sessions at CrossFit Chiang Mai. (totally optional, but included)

- The time of your life! (not optional)

What is not included?

- Airfare to and from Thailand

- A handful of meals that are outlined in the itinerary below and shouldn’t cost you more than $50 in total.

- Gratuity for hotel staff, transportation, massage therapists, etc… This is all totally up to you and while not required, is always appreciated. Be generous!

Patara Elephant Farm

When should I arrive?

If you are doing the Bangkok add-on, aim to arrive between 09:00 and 15:00 on November 4th.

If you are flying into Chiang Mai, aim to arrive between 09:00 and 15:00 on November 5th.

When should I depart?

- If you are doing the Bangkok add-on, aim to depart any time after 10:00 on November 12th. We will arrive by train into Bangkok that morning at 06:30.

- If you are flying out of Chiang Mai, aim to depart any time after noon on November 11th.

What can I expect from the Bangkok add-on?

You can expect an opportunity for a deeper cultural experience of Thailand. We will board the train in the evening and travel overnight to Chiang Mai. You will share a first class accommodation with someone else in our group. There is an upper and lower berth, which is essentially a bed for sleeping.  You could fly in early in the day on the 4th and have a handful of hours to explore Bangkok. Nick and Steph will both be on this leg of the trip.

Cooking School

Itinerary

November 4th (Bangkok Add-On ONLY)

Arrive Bangkok

18:15 Board Train to Chiang Mai

November 5th

*** Lunch and dinner are on your own this day as people will be arriving at different times and we’ll be at the Bazaar at night.

08:15 Arrive to Chiang Mai by Train (Bangkok Add-On Only)

- Arrive and check into hotel

- Dinner at Night Bazaar (North end of Chang Klan Rd.)

November 6th

*** Breakfast, lunch and early dinner will be provided on this day. They say we’ll be stuffed when we leave class, but if you want to eat later in the evening, that will be on you.

- Casual morning with breakfast at the hotel.

- 10:00 – 16:00 Cooking School

- Free evening with opportunity for CrossFit, exploring Chiang Mai and visiting local markets.

November 7th

*** Breakfast and lunch will be provided on this day. Dinner will be on your own.

- Patara Elephant Farm (Click here for this day’s itinerary including a mountainside lunch at a waterfall accessed on elephant back.)

November 8th

*** Breakfast and dinner will be provided on this day. Lunch will be on your own.

- Free Day

- Dinner at Gain Yang Cherng Doi (Nom Nom Paleo’s favorite Chiang Mai restaurant).

November 9th

*** Breakfast, lunch and early dinner will be provided on this day. They say we’ll be stuffed when we leave class, but if you want to eat later in the evening, that will be on you.

- Casual morning with breakfast at the hotel

- 10:00 – 16:00 Cooking School

- Tha Pae Gate – Sunday Night Market / Walking Street

November 10th

*** Breakfast, lunch and dinner will be provided on this day.

- 08:00 – 14:45 Flight of The Gibbon Rainforest Adventure

- 19:00 Group dinner

November 11th

*** Breakfast will be provided on this day. Lunch and dinner will be on our own.

12:00 Check out of hotel.

16:00 Depart Train Station for Bangkok (Bangkok Add-On Only)

November 12th

06:30 Arrive to Bangkok

??:00 Catch your return flight home.

 

Floating Market Paleo Thailand 

While we’ve attempted to answer any questions you might have, I’m sure that we’ve missed something. Please feel free to leave questions in the comments below or email Nick (nick@paleonick.com). 

It has been Nick’s experience with these Culinary Adventures (he’s lead them to Alaska and Nicaragua) that people “go hard in the paint.” For this reason, we’ve have left mornings and evenings pretty open and even included a free day in the middle. Part of the balance of life is rest and, while we often want to see and do everything, it is important to withdraw and actually relax. After all, that is what vacations are for, no? If you want to participate in less than what we’ve planned, you have that option too.

Thank you for checking out the details of this Culinary Adventure. We truly hope that you can join us, and we look forward to meeting all of you!

Steph & Nick

IMG_2588   Nick Massie of Paleo Nick | stupideasypaleo.com

Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice

Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice | stupideasypaleo.com

Making your own Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice means you’ll never run out again. I love shaking some into a homemade pumpkin spice latte…perfect way to celebrate fall!

Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice

Rating: 51

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Yield: 1/4 cup (22 g)

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Combine the ingredients in a small container (I like jelly jars like these) and cover.
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Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice | stupideasypaleo.com

What’s your favorite way to use pumpkin pie spice?

Do I Need to Eat Post-Workout Meal?: Ask Steph

Do I Need to Eat a Post-Workout Meal? | stupideasypaleo.com

(Want to submit your own question to be featured on Ask Steph? Submit it via the contact form, and use the subject line “Ask Steph!”)

Adam C. writes:

Steph, I’m wondering if you can help me figure out if I need to eat a post-workout meal? I usually train 3 times a week at CrossFit, and I hike once a week. There’s so much confusing info out there!

Adam C.

Adam’s question is an incredibly common one, and something I hear a lot over at The Paleo Athlete Facebook page and after folks read The Paleo Athlete. Let’s break this down.

Nutrient Timing, Simplified

For the purpose of Adam’s question, I’m going to simplify this discussion. You can really go crazy with PubMed and Google Scholar, digging into the primary literature about pre-, intra-, and post-workout nutrition. My aim here is to provide a summary of the most salient points.

Eating protein and carbohydrate after training serves two main purposes. First, consuming protein means you’re supplying the necessary amino acids for repairing muscle (via a process called muscle protein synthesis). After muscle is worked in training, microtraumas must be repaired. Protein that is dense in the branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) is preferred, and that looks like meat, seafood, eggs and for some people, whey protein. (Click here to read my stance on whey.) For a complete list of BCAA-rich proteins that are compatible with a Paleo approach, click here.

Second, eating carbohydrate in an insulin-sensitive state helps replenish your main glycogen (stored glucose) tank: muscle. A smaller amount of glycogen is also stored in the liver but is not the primary source tapped into when you train hard. Consuming a carbohydrate that is rich in glucose after training is important, especially when said training is intense and / or long. What does that type of carbohydrate look like? Starchy vegetables such as sweet potatoes, white potatoes (click here to read my stance on white potatoes), plantains and yuca provide the most nutrient bang for the carbohydrate buck. For a complete list of carbohydrates that are compatible with a Paleo approach, click here.

It’s worth mentioning here that post-workout meals are best when they don’t contain fat (or contain very little). Why? Fat causes the stomach to empty slower which is counter to the point of the post-workout refuel. Save the fat for your three square meals a day.

How soon should you eat protein and carbs after your workout is over? That’ll be covered in the next section.

The Issue of Frequency

So, we’ve established that consuming protein and carbohydrate post-workout is important for recovery. But how soon after training do you need to eat it? Is there ever a time when you don’t need to eat post-workout?

When trying to help individuals determine if eating a post-workout meal is right for them, I always come back to this one factor: frequency. How often are you training and more critically, how much time do you have between training sessions?

Let’s compare two hypotheticals.

Adam trains 3 times a week (MWF) at CrossFit and hikes once a week, typically on Sunday. In Adam’s case, he has a full day to recover and refuel between each training session. Even though his intensity is high on MWF, he has time to replenish with regular meals. His Sunday hike, while it goes for a couple hours, is low on the intensity scale. Unless Adam is trying to aggressively gain mass, it’s unlikely that he will suffer from lack of a post-workout meal.

Contrast that to Lauren who trains 6 times a week (Tu-Sun). She’s a competitive cyclist who includes long rides on the weekends and interval training during the week. Also, two days a week she strength trains then goes for a ride, including intervals. On Fridays, she trains in the afternoon after work, and Saturday morning is a long ride with her club team. She takes Mondays off. Lauren is training far more frequently than Adam. She’s working out on back to back days, doing some double sessions, and including intensity in her training. Someone like Lauren would be wise to eat a post-workout meal not only from a caloric standpoint, but also to provide the substrate for recovery. Specifically, her Friday night post-workout refuel is really important because she’s got less than 12 hours between sessions.

It’s worth mentioning that Adam, while he trains, is not really interested in being a competitive athlete. Yes, he wants to improve his lifts and his benchmark workouts, but CrossFit for him is fun and a way to stay active. He’s not really driven by performance. Lauren, on the other hand, is training for some large national-level races and has specific performance goals. It’s an important distinction to make, because, as a performance-driven athlete, Lauren really needs to pay attention to her post-workout nutrition, sleep and recovery practices more than Adam.

To summarize, the more frequently you train (especially if those sessions include intensity and / or are back to back), the more important it is to eat a post-workout meal. And, when you’re training the next day, it’s generally best to eat a post-workout meal.

When and What to Eat Post-Workout?

If eating a post-workout meal (because you’re training frequently and performance is a priority), eat as soon as possible once training is over. If the workout was particularly intense and you’re drooling and sweating all over yourself, let your body relax a bit and get closer to a parasympathetic (rest and digest) state before trying to shove some food in your mouth. For most folks, 15-30 minutes after the workout ends is a good window, though some sources will say 15-60 minutes.

I don’t think it’s worth arguing about 30 minutes, but I will caution you against the following: You’re training like Lauren and waiting a few hours to eat anything. Remember, her schedule includes a high frequency of training. Getting nutrients in as soon as possible is her best bet.

What to eat is relatively simple: something with protein and carbohydrate. The options here depend a LOT on your lifestyle, time demands, food tolerances and personal preferences. Some people like leftover meat and sweet potatoes. Some people lean toward protein shakes with added carbohydrate for convenience. (Remember, supplements are not nutritionally superior to real food.) If you are trying to lean out a bit, I recommend avoiding liquid foods like protein shakes and sticking to solid foods.

The best way to find what works for you is to test it out and make some notes in your training log about what you ate, when you ate it, and what your recovery and performance are like. Click here for a list of protein and here for a list of carbs to get started. Shameless plug: My ebook The Paleo Athlete goes into a lot more detail about how much to eat (and the theory behind all this), and my upcoming cookbook has 100 recipes specifically for performance-minded folks (and it’s on early bird sale pricing from Amazon and Barnes and Noble right now).

How much to eat varies a lot and depends largely on things like body size and activity level. Click here to see some fueling tables, but please know that you’ll need to test things out. There’s no way I can possibly give specific recommendations for as wide and varied a readership as I have because I don’t know the details of your training and life. My best advice is to start with a modest amount of protein and carbs and track your recovery and performance data. Write down how much you ate (roughly, don’t be a crazy person carrying around a food scale) and when. Write down how you felt in training, if you felt recovered, etc. If you notice that over time you’re not performing well, it may be time to bump up your post-workout protein and / or carbohydrate.

For example, I might eat a chicken breast and half a sweet potato about 30 minutes after I train. If I do this for a couple weeks and notice that I feel really sluggish, sore and generally not recovered, I might bump it to a whole sweet potato. Then, I’ll stick to that for a couple weeks and note any changes.

Hopefully this has given you the tools to evaluate whether or not a post-workout meal is necessary for you.

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Do I Need to Eat a Post-Workout Meal? | stupideasypaleo.com

What do you usually eat post-workout? Leave your answer in the comments below.

HUGE 50k Instagram Giveaway

50k Instagram Giveaway | stupideasypaleo.com Instagram is probably my favorite social media platform because I get to share tons of images about food, fitness and life. Recently, I ticked over 50,000 fans, and to celebrate this growing community, I’ve got a HUGE giveaway going.

I’ve pooled together some amazing prizes from my personal favorite food and fitness brands into one gigantic package worth over $900! This is all made possible by the generosity of these great companies, so show them some love by checking out what they have to offer, and following them on social media.

What’s Up for Grabs

Total prize value: $975+

How to Enter

  1. The action is all happening on Instagram, so be sure to head there to enter.
  2. Follow me (@stupideasypaleo) and the other brands in the giveaway: @5280meat, @gingernewtrition, @purepharma, @epicbar, @kasandrinos, @meljoulwan, @paleoparents, @burgerlounge@nomnompaleo, @realfoodliz, @whole9life, @coffeeblocks, @fatfaceskincare, @petespaleo, @powerathletehq and @omgheebutter.
  3. Tag 3 friends in the original photo, OR regram the original photo and use the hashtag #SEP50K.
  4. The contest ends 11:59 pm PST on Thursday September 4, 2014.

*The winner will be announced within 24 hours here and on Instagram. You have 24 hours to reply to info@stupideasypaleo.com with your full name, shipping address and phone number. If that winner does not reply in 24 hours, a new winner will be selected. Then, your shipping info will be forwarded to the brands involved in the giveaway, and they will each fulfill their listed prize. Open to US residents only due to shipping costs.

50k Instagram Giveaway | stupideasypaleo.com

 

Introducing a Better Way to Save & Print Recipes

Introducing a Better Way to Save & Print Recipes | stupideasypaleo.com

Want a better way to save and / or print recipes from my site? Many folks have requested an easier way to do just that, and I’ve finally implemented something I think you’ll like.

From now going forward (and as soon as I have time to start working back into the archives), I’m using an application called ZipList for the recipes I post. This makes it much more convenient for you!

Here’s how it works:

  • If you want to view recipes on the site as you always have, nothing has changed except a bit of formatting.
  • If you want to print a recipe, simply click the printer icon in the upper right corner.

Introducing a Better Way to Save & Print Recipes | stupideasypaleo.com

Introducing a Better Way to Save & Print Recipes | stupideasypaleo.com

  • If you want to save a recipe to ZipList, click “Save Recipe.” It’ll take you to ZipList, and you’ll be able to sign up for a free account that works like a recipe box. In the future, you can click on the recipe “card” and it’ll take you back to my site for the full directions. You can also create an optional shopping list, too.

Introducing a Better Way to Save & Print Recipes | stupideasypaleo.com

Introducing a Better Way to Save & Print Recipes | stupideasypaleo.com

Introducing a Better Way to Save & Print Recipes | stupideasypaleo.com

I hope you find the upgraded features helpful! I’m in the midst of an overall website redesign, but some of the features will be rolling out on the existing site / blog as we get ready to transition!

Make sure to pin this post!

Introducing a Better Way to Save & Print Recipes | stupideasypaleo.com

Pork Chile Verde—Paleo & Whole30

Pork Chili Verde—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com Pork Chile Verde is a classic, flavorful recipe that’s Paleo and Whole30-friendly. Instead of the usual jalapeño peppers, I used some Hatch chiles. They’re in season right now at the end of August, and their mild heat really rounds out the base of flavors from the onion, garlic and tomatillos. If you can’t find fresh Hatch chiles, you can often find them canned in the ethnic foods section of the market.

Probably my favorite thing about this Pork Chile Verde recipe is that it’s affordable. Pork shoulder is inexpensive, but the meat can be tough, so simmering it for a couple hours makes it melt-in-your-mouth tender. If you have leftovers, try reheating the meat and sauce, then dropping a couple eggs into the pan and putting a lid on it until the eggs are poached through. It’s a fantastic breakfast, and so delicious. Serve with some cauliflower rice and my Simple Paleo Tortillas for a complete meal.

Pork Chile Verde—Paleo & Whole30

Rating: 51

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 2 hours, 15 minutes

Yield: 2 to 3 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 to 2-1/2 lb (907 to 1134 g) pork shoulder, pork butt or Boston butt
  • 1 tsp (5 g) sea salt
  • 1 tsp (2 g) ground cumin
  • 1 tsp (2 g) ground coriander
  • 1/2 tsp (1 g) black pepper
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) ghee
  • 1/2 large onion, diced
  • 3 Hatch green chiles* (6 oz / 171 g), seeded and diced
  • 3/4 lb (340 g) tomatillos, husk removed and diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 c (473 mL) chicken broth
  • Large handful of fresh cilantro for garnish
  • *If you can't find fresh Hatch green chiles (available in late summer), you can use canned Hatch green chiles (two 4 oz / 113 g cans)

Directions

  1. Trim the fat off the pork, and cut it into 1 inch (2.5 centimeter) chunks. Put the pork in a medium bowl, and toss it with the salt, cumin, coriander, and pepper.
  2. Heat a large, deep-sided skillet over medium-high, and melt the ghee. Add the pork and brown each side for about 2 minutes. You're just trying to develop some color, not cook it all the way through. Remove the pork to a clean bowl while you cook the veggies.
  3. Reduce the heat to medium, then add the onion, tomatillos, and chiles. Cook and stir for 5 to 7 minutes until the onions soften and turn translucent. Then, add the garlic and chicken broth, and put the pork back in the skillet. Stir to combine.
  4. Bring this mixture to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Cover and simmer for 1 hour. Remove the lid and simmer for 1 more hour, until the sauce has reduced a bit and the pork is very tender.
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Change It Up

  • Double the recipe, and freeze the leftovers.
  • I haven’t tried this recipe in the slow cooker yet, but I suspect it would come out well if cooked on low for about 5 hours. I’d still brown the meat and onion / peppers before throwing everything in the slow cookers.

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Pork Chili Verde—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question? Leave it in the comments below!

Beet Ginger Sauerkraut

Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com

Beet Ginger Sauerkraut has long been on my agenda to make, especially after I picked up a bag from Farmhouse Cultures. It was so delicious, and while buying it pre-made is convenient, it’s far more affordable to make it myself. The beets add a bit of sweetness—plus, the color is fantastic—and the ginger is so flavorful and provides a little bite.

I have a few sauerkraut / fermentation posts on this site already, and this isn’t really any different from those. If you’re a newbie to making sauerkraut, take a deep breath (it’s going to be okay!), and read through the whole post before you start the process. It’s actually very, very simple but there are a couple key points to remember:

  • This method uses lacto-fermentation with only salt and whatever Lactobacillus bacteria are kickin’ around your kitchen environment. There is no whey in this method.
  • The veggies must stay submerged under the brine (in an anaerobic environment) the *whole* time you’re fermenting them…and even after they’re done. If not, they’ll mold quickly.
  • Clean all your glassware, utensils and hands well before you start. For extra insurance against contamination, rinse everything with white vinegar.
  • You don’t have to use a fancy fermentation cap like this, but they make the process a bit easier, and there’s less chance of contamination. I used the Kraut Source prototype for this batch, and I’m super impressed at how simple it was. It was especially good at keeping the veggies submerged. They are about to finish their Kickstarter, so get in on it while you can!
  • I’ve included a troubleshooting section at the end of this post, so if you’re seeing odd things during fermentation, check there to see if it’s normal or you should toss your ferment.

Prep time: 30 min     Ferment time:  7–14 days     Makes: 1-quart (946 mL) jar

Ingredients for Beet Ginger Sauerkraut

  • 2 lb (907 g) green cabbage (you’ll use half unless making a double batch)
  • 8 oz (227 g) red beets
  • 2–3 oz (57–85 g) fresh ginger
  • 1-1/2 tbsp (22 g) coarse sea salt (I like this one)
  • If you need extra brine, use 1 tsp (5 g) salt in 1 cup (237 mL) water

Directions for Beet Ginger Sauerkraut

The basic method for making sauerkraut goes like this:

Thinly slice the vegetables, then salt them. Pulverize the veggies by crushing them with your hands to release the juices. Pack them tightly into a jar, submerging the veggies underneath the brine. Cover with something—like fabric—so dust and bugs stay out, but air can still escape. (Gas is generated as part of the fermentation process, so don’t cover it with an airtight lid unless it’s one specifically made for fermenting or you run the risk of the jar exploding due to pressure.) Let it sit in a dark cabinet for at least a week—or longer, depending on how sour you like it—then refrigerate.

For this batch:

  1. Cut the cabbage in half. You’ll only be using half for this recipe, unless you decide to double it. (In that case, you’ll need to double the amount of beets, ginger, and sea salt, and you’ll need another jar set-up.) Very thinly slice the cabbage. I used a mandolin, but I’ve done it plenty of times with a sharp knife. Toss the cabbage into a very large bowl. Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com
  2. To prepare the beets, I scrubbed but didn’t peel them. If you’d like, you can peel them, but it’s just an extra step. I thinly sliced the beets into rounds using a mandolin, then stacked them up, and sliced them into matchsticks. Alternatively, you could shred them in a food processor or with a box grater (but that is SUPER messy because beet juice stains). Place the beets into the bowl with the cabbage.
  3. For the ginger, I grated it down finely using a microplane grater. You could also mince it by hand, just be sure the pieces are very small since biting into chunks of ginger is very spicy. Place the grated ginger in the bowl with the beets and cabbage. Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com
  4. Now, add the salt. With clean hands, start to scrunch the veggies as you mix everything together. You have to get aggressive here because you’re trying to break down the cells in the veggies and (with the help of the salt) draw out the moisture. This takes at least 5 minutes of scrunching and squeezing. (Yay for kitchen fitness!) If there’s not a lot of moisture after that time, add more by making some brine (salt water) with 1 teaspoon salt in 1 cup of water. Some cabbages are just drier than others. C’est la vie! Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com
  5. Pack the veggies into a wide-mouth quart-sized Mason jar. Really push them down. (I use my fist or a spoon.) The veggies should come up to about the shoulder of the jar. If there is not at least an inch of liquid covering the veggies, add some brine to cover. Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com Now, you have a couple options: use a special lid for fermenting to cap it all off or use a simple DIY cover. For this batch, I used a new prototype lid from Kraut Source. It uses a spring mechanism to hold the veggies down under the brine. However, if you don’t have that, the other method I’ve used successfully is to place a 4-ounce jelly jar INTO the wide-mouth jar to keep the veggies submerged. It works really, really well. Click here to see pictures and video. Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com
  6. Place the jar into a bowl or on a plate in case any liquid bubbles out. If you’re using the jar in jar method, cover with a kitchen towel and place in a cupboard or pantry for at least a week. Check the level of the liquid every couple days. If the level has dropped, add more brine. After a week, remove a bit of kraut with a fork and test the flavor. If it’s not sour enough for your liking, keep fermenting. (I find that it’s good for me around 10-14 days, but everyone is different. Some like to keep it going for weeks!) When it’s done, cover with a metal Mason jar lid and refrigerate. Keeps for a few months. Remember to keep the kraut submerged in brine the whole time, even in the fridge or it’ll mold.

 Troubleshooting your Beet Ginger Sauerkraut

  • My veggies are slimy. Bad bacteria have probably started to grow in your jar. Best to toss it out to be safe.
  • My veggies have run out of liquid. If this was recent, within a day or so, top off with more brine. If it’s been several days, you may want to throw it out and start again.
  • Help! My veggies are foaming! This is normal especially after the first couple days of fermentation because gases are being released by the bacteria and can cause bubbles or foam. You can skim the foam and keep on rockin’.
  • I see white stuff at the bottom of the jar. Is this okay? Yes. These are the bacteria. It’s totally normal.
  • Um, my veggies have greenish-black mold on top. If you’re adventurous, you can skim it and keep going. This is how moldy ferment has been dealt with for ages (and I can tell you lots of stories about what they do with moldy cheese in the grocery store). If you’re totally grossed out, just start over.
  • It’s been a couple weeks and the veggies still aren’t sour or tangy. You may have them in too cold of a spot. Try putting them in a warmer location to speed up the process a bit.

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Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question about making sauerkraut? Leave it in the comments below!

Muscle Mavens: AHS 2014 Wrap-Up

 

Muscle Mavens: AHS14 Wrap-Up | stupideasypaleo.com

If the theme at PaleoFX earlier this year was “stress,” it’s safe to say that “muscle” was a popular word at the Ancestral Health Symposium (AHS), held just a couple weeks ago. This year’s conference was held at UC Berkeley, and was attended by scientists and researchers, medical practitioners, bloggers and writers, and folks curious to know more about what’s new in the field of ancestral health.

I heard some pretty amazing talks, and while the variety of topics was as diverse as gut health to sustainable coffee (and everything in between), I was pretty taken with how many folks at AHS were talking about muscle.

First worth mentioning was “Specific Requirements & Health Benefits of Strength Training for Women,” the talk I gave with Stacy from Paleo Parents. She is an avid strongwoman competitor, and I’m an Olympic weightlifter, so it was a natural fit to talk about something we are both so passionate about.

Muscle Mavens: AHS14 Wrap-Up | stupideasypaleo.com

photo courtesy Sarah Ballantyne, The Paleo Mom

Here’s our presentation on the AHS14 YouTube channel (I encourage you to check out the other talks…the one on bone broth is excellent!), and here’s a summary:

  • A vast majority of women lack the genetic capability to build very large muscle mass (due to a gene for the protein myostatin and the very small amount of testosterone we produce).
  • To be most effective and positively influence metabolism and body composition, lifting should be 1) heavy (relative to the person’s current capacity); 2) low rep (in the realm of 1-5 reps); 3) involve compound movements such as squats, deadlifts and presses; and 4) involve type II (fast twitch) fibers that are most active under heavy load and “fast” speeds.
  • The 1600+ women who took our survey most often cited improvements in body composition, confidence and a sense of community amongst the reasons they like lifting.

Another excellent talk was Jamie Scott’s lecture on “The Underappreciated Role of Muscle in Health and Disease” (which you can watch for free by clicking here). In it, Jamie elucidated muscle’s grossly underestimated role as an endocrine organ, involved intimately in our body’s metabolism. I highly, HIGHLY recommend you watch his talk.

Muscle Mavens: AHS14 Wrap-Up | stupideasypaleo.com

He also brought home a critical point: In the world of ancestral health and in conventional medicine, we (as a collective) are often focused so much on fat gain or loss that we overlook how important muscle is. This has incredible implications, not just in terms of moving our bodies for sport, but for the regulation of metabolism, and as an incredible protective mechanism as we age.

A couple other great presentations on muscle were by Skyler Tanner and Keith Norris.

I also got to work at my publisher’s booth, and finally got to meet some of the folks involved in making our books reality.  It was pretty surreal to see my cover up there with some other sweet Paleo titles such as The Frugal Paleo Cookbook, The Paleo Foodie, and Paleo Takes 5. My book is being copyedited right now, and then it’s on to the final design phase. You can pre-order through Amazon or Barnes & Noble and save 25%!

Muscle Mavens: AHS14 Wrap-Up | stupideasypaleo.com Muscle Mavens: AHS14 Wrap-Up | stupideasypaleo.com Muscle Mavens: AHS14 Wrap-Up | stupideasypaleo.com

I’m already looking forward to attending the New Zealand AHS next year (with these guys above), and I’m already plotting my presentation.

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Muscle Mavens: AHS14 Wrap-Up | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question? Leave it in the comments section below!

Healing Chicken Soup—Paleo & Whole30

Healing Chicken Soup—Paleo & Whole30 |stupideasypaleo.com

It’s hardly a secret that chicken soup is “good for what ails you”—as my grandmother used to say. If you’re a science nerd like me and want to know the how and why, click here and here. If you’re just here for the yummy recipe, you can skip all that. Suffice to say, maybe this soup isn’t a panacea, but it is definitely delicious.

I kicked up the healing properties of bone broth with the trio of ginger, turmeric, and garlic. Besides tasting aromatic and well, decidedly victorious, ginger and turmeric bring their anti-inflammatory compounds to this dish, and garlic, its antiviral properties. Infusing the broth is well worth the extra twenty minutes!

You can really dress this up anyway you’d like. I added some shredded chicken, green onion, carrot and shiitake mushrooms (gotta love that umami!) along with some gluten-free noodles made from mountain yam. Consider the broth a blank palette upon which to draw with your favorite flavors.

Healing Chicken Soup—Paleo & Whole30

Rating: 51

Yield: Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 4 cups (946 mL) chicken broth
  • 2 inch (5.1 cm) piece fresh ginger, sliced into thin coins
  • 1 inch piece (2.5 cm) fresh turmeric*, sliced into thin coins
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled & smashed
  • 1/2 teaspoon (3 mL) fish sauce
  • 2 cups (280 g) cooked shredded chicken
  • 4 ounces (113 g) shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  • 3 green onions (48 g), white and light green parts, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium carrot (40 g), julienned or shredded
  • Sea salt, to taste
  • Optional: 1 cup (227 g) zucchini noodles, kelp noodles, or mountain yam shiritaki noodles
  • Optional: Paleo Sriracha for drizzling

Directions

  1. Pour the chicken broth into a medium pot, and add the ginger, turmeric, garlic and fish sauce. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for 20 to 30 minutes to really infuse the broth with flavor. Note: If using turmeric powder (ground turmeric), start with 1/4 teaspoon (0.5 gram), and increase to 1/2 teaspoon (1 gram), depending on your preference. I find turmeric powder to be insanely potent, much more so than the fresh root, so always add less and bump it up if you'd like. While the broth is simmering, prepare the rest of the ingredients.
  2. Using a slotted spoon, remove the ginger, turmeric and garlic. Discard. Or, if you like to live dangerously, leave it all in the soup and pick around it while you're eating (like I did in the photo). Just be aware: Biting into a large chunk of ginger, turmeric or garlic is usually not pleasant.
  3. Add the chicken, mushrooms, green onions, carrot and if desired, your noodles. Heat about 5 minutes on medium-low or until everything is warmed through. Taste and adjust the seasoning with sea salt.
  4. Serve with a drizzle of sriracha for some extra heat.

Notes

*If you can't find fresh turmeric root, sub in 1/4 teaspoon (0.5 g) turmeric powder. When working with any form of turmeric, take care because it stains hands, clothing and porous surfaces.

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Change It Up!

  • Use beef or fish broth instead of chicken.
  • Use any protein you prefer or have on hand.
  • Add in your favorite thinly cut veggies.
  • Instead of fish sauce, substitute 1 teaspoon coconut aminos.

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Healing Chicken Soup—Paleo & Whole30 |stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question? Leave it in the comments below!

August Giveaway: $100 Gift Certificate for 5280 Beef

August Giveaway—$100 Gift Certificate for 5280 Beef | stupideasypaleo.com

August’s giveaway is gift certificate worth $100 for 5280 Beef!

When a box with a handwritten #meatgram hashtag shows up at your doorstep, you tend to take notice!

I’m so excited to offer up a $100 gift certificate for 5280 Beef for the August giveaway. I first learned about them when I saw them on Instagram. In a very short time, they’ve become an integral part of the Paleo / real food community because, simply put, the quality of their grass-fed beef and pasture-raised pork (and soon to come, grass-fed lamb) is top-notch. Couple that with excellent customer service and the personal touches of a family run business, and you’ve got an unbeatable combination.

A little bit about 5280 Beef…

I sat down recently and interviewed Rachel and Ty Gates, 5280 Beef’s masterminds. They, along with Ty’s dad and brother, are responsible for everything that goes into running their Colorado ranch where the animals are raised. Ty recognized the growing demand for better-quality meat, and their family moved back to Meeker, CO to start 5280 Beef.

Says Rachel, “Ultimately, we wanted to offer customers meat products that were clean—meaning free of added growth hormones, steroids and antibiotics that are pumped into the animal’s feed. We are ultimately taking the large commercialization of animals and their meat, out of our equation. ” 

August Giveaway—$100 Gift Certificate for 5280 Beef | stupideasypaleo.com

5280 Beef’s cows (those are actually them in the picture above) are grass-fed which results in better quality meat—specifically an higher amount of anti-inflammatory Omega-3 fatty acids and more conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), an important antioxidant—compared to feedlot, grain-fed animals. Because the cows eat grass, their natural food source, the result is not only healthier meet, but a happier, more ethically-raised animal.

Rachel notes, “…we wanted to raise animals in a conscious, humane environment—low stress, no feedlots or small cages, having the processing be done swiftly and humanely in a family-owned local USDA inspected facility. Each animal is treated with love and care and not taken for granted. These animals make the ultimate sacrifice so we can eat & nourish our bodies and with that, we owe them the utmost respect.”

The Gates family, though they’re relative newcomers to the Paleo community, have experienced firsthand why the movement toward real food is so powerful. Rachel adds, “There is a…demand from consumers to know more about their food and even more importantly, what makes up the ingredients in the foods we eat.”

I’ve cooked my way through several cuts of beef and pork from 5280 Beef (I even made jerky for my cookbook with one of their gorgeous rump roast…best jerky ever), and it’s absolutely delicious.

The winner will receive a gift certificate for $100 for any products from the 5280 Beef online store that (s)he chooses.

The giveaway has now ended. Congratulations to Amanda S., a**************1@gmail.com!

To enter for a chance to win a $100 Gift Certificate for 5280 Beef!

#1 Use the Rafflecopter widget below to finalize your entry and unlock other bonus entries! (This is how the winner will be drawn, so don’t skip this step!)

#2 Check out 5280 Beef’s products, and leave a comment telling us one thing from their store you’re most excited to try.

Enter here:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The contest ends August 31, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. PST, and the winner will be announced here on the blog by September 2, 2014. Be sure to check back to see if you won!

The winner will be emailed and will have 48 hours to confirm back with his or her full name, address, and phone number (for shipping purposes) to claim the prize. Open to readers worldwide. If someone outside the US wins, a gift certificate to Amazon.com for $100 will be provided instead due to shipping costs.

Connect with 5280 Beef on social media: Instagram (they share TONS of recipe inspiration), Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter.

Click here to pin this!

August Giveaway—$100 Gift Certificate for 5280 Beef | stupideasypaleo.com

Remember to comment below with which product—beef, pork or lamb—you’d be most excited to try!

(Image credits: 5280 Beef)

Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer with Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee

Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer with Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee | stupideasypaleo.com

It’s time to break up with the chemical-filled coffee creamers! One of the more common questions I get from folks is what to substitute for their favorite coffee creamer once they go Paleo. Luckily, with a few easy swaps, you can create your own deliciously flavorful dairy-free creamer. Customize it by adding a bit of natural sweetener if you prefer or leave it out for a sugar-free creamer. The choice is up to you! For a joint- and gut-soothing boost, add high-quality collagen.

To go with this Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer, I’m showing you how easy it is to make your own cold-brew coffee. Cold-brew is gaining in popularity because it’s less acidic and tends to have a smoother taste than other brew methods. This ratio of beans to water is perfect for my palate, but you can always cut back to 3 cups of water if you like it stronger. Of course, you can use the creamer in any coffee or tea you’d like.

Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer with Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee | stupideasypaleo.com

For the Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer

Makes ~2 cups (473 grams)

Ingredients

Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer with Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee | stupideasypaleo.com

Directions

  1. Place the hazelnuts in a glass jar or bowl—I like to use a quart-sized Mason jar—and add 2 cups (473 grams) cold water. Cover loosely, and let the jar sit at room temperature for 12 to 24 hours. When you’re ready to make the creamer, pour off the soaking water.
  2. In a high-speed blender, combine the soaked and drained hazelnuts and 2 cups (473 grams) fresh water. Blend on high for 30 to 60 seconds, or until the nuts are broken down. Strain the mixture through a nut milk bag or several layers of cheesecloth, squeezing out as much moisture as possible. Discard the pulp or save it to make hazelnut flour. Pour the hazelnut milk back into the blender.
  3. On a cutting board, use a sharp knife to split the vanilla bean down the middle and gently scrape out the black seeds. Add the vanilla seeds to the blender. If desired, add the honey and / or collagen. Blend on medium-high for 15 to 30 seconds until everything is combined.
  4. Pour into a storage jar and cover tightly. Keeps for 3 to 4 days in the refrigerator.

*Omit the sweetener for Whole30.

Note: You can replicate this creamer with whatever kind of nuts you prefer.

Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer with Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee | stupideasypaleo.com

For the Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee

Makes 4 cups.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup (50 g) ground coffee beans (look for a fair trade variety)
  • 4 cups (946 mL) water

Directions

  1. Pour the coarse-ground coffee beans into a 1-liter French press. Add the water, and stir with a wooden spoon.
  2. Refrigerate the French press for 12 to 24 hours. Add the plunger and carefully press it down until the ground are filtered out. If your beans were finely ground, you may want to filter the coffee through a coffee filter before drinking to remove any excess residue.
  3. Pour over ice cubes to serve cold with Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer!
  4. Stores for up to a few days in the fridge when covered tightly (for best freshness).

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Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer with Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer with Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee | stupideasypaleo.com

Questions? Leave them in the comments below!

Slow Cooker Thai Beef Stew—Plus a Chance to Win Meals Made Simple

Paleo Slow Cooker Thai Beef Stew | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: Today’s recipe is a sneak peek from Danielle Walker’s new book, “Meals Made Simple” which releases on September 2, 2014. I’ve been lucky to preview the cookbook, and it’s amazing…great for newbie cooks or anyone who just enjoys simple, delicious food. Danielle notes: “Jicama may seem like a strange ingredient to add to this dish, but it provides a slight crunch similar to that of water chestnuts or bamboo shoots and adds a mildly sweet flavor.” Serve with cauliflower rice (pictured).

Slow Cooker Thai Beef Stew

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 5 hours

Yield: Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients

  • 2 Tablespoons coconut oil, divided
  • 3 pounds beef stew meat, trimmed of fat
  • 1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons peeled and minced fresh ginger
  • 1 (13½-ounce) can full-fat coconut milk
  • 1/3 cup tomato paste
  • 1/2 cup Thai red curry paste
  • 2 Tablespoons fish sauce
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lime juice
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 2 cups broccoli florets
  • 2 cups julienned carrots
  • 1 cup peeled and julienned jicama*
  • Fresh cilantro, for garnish

Directions

  1. Heat 1 tablespoon of the coconut oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Working in batches, brown the meat on all sides.
  2. Use a slotted spoon to transfer each batch of browned meat directly to the slow cooker, then continue browning. Wipe out the skillet between batches if a lot of liquid has accumulated at the bottom to ensure even browning.
  3. Wipe out the skillet and add the remaining 1 tablespoon of coconut oil. Sauté the onion, garlic, and ginger over medium-high heat for 5 minutes.
  4. Pour in the coconut milk and stir continuously to release the browned bits on the bottom of the pan.
  5. Add the tomato paste, curry paste, fish sauce, lime juice, and salt, then pour the mixture over the beef in the slow cooker.
  6. Cook on high for 5 hours or low for 8 hours. Add the broccoli, carrots, and jicama during the last 30 minutes if cooking on high, or the last hour if cooking on low. Serve garnished with cilantro.

Notes

*Omit for SCD

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Stretch It

The leftover meat tastes fabulous in scrambled eggs!

Make-Ahead Tip

Prepare Steps 1 through 5, then place the contents in an airtight container or bag. Freeze for up to 3 months, then thaw overnight in the refrigerator

The giveaway is now closed. Congratulations to the winner, Julia B. at a*****9@gmail.com!

To enter for a chance to win a free copy of “Meals Made Simple!

Use the Rafflecopter widget below to finalize your entry and unlock other bonus entries! (This is how the winner will be drawn, so don’t skip this step!)

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The contest ends August 10, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. PT, and the winner will be announced here on the blog by August 12, 2014. Be sure to check back to see if you won!

The winner will be emailed and will have 48 hours to confirm back with his or her full name, address, and phone number to claim the prize. Open to US residents only.

Click here to pin this!

Paleo Slow Cooker Thai Beef Stew | stupideasypaleo.com

Chicken Wings Scarpariello

Chicken Wings Scarpariello—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: Today’s recipe is brought to you by my guest blogger Bob from Not So Fast Food. Bob runs San Diego’s first Paleo food truck and is mega-creative in the kitchen. You may remember him from this interview I posted last year. Enjoy this flavor-packed wing recipe!

Ingredients for Chicken Wings Scarpariello

Chicken Wings Scarpariello

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Yield: Serves 1 or 2

Ingredients

    For the wings:
  • 12 chicken wings
  • 2 Tablespoons avocado oil
  • 1/2 bunch fresh rosemary (about 3 sprigs)
  • 1/2 bunch fresh sage (about 3 large leaves)
  • 1/2 bunch fresh oregano (about 3 sprigs)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 lemon, squeezed
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  • For the Sauce:
  • 1 large shallot, chopped
  • 1/2 cup chicken stock
  • 1/2 lemon, squeezed
  • 2 Tablespoons white wine*
  • 1 Tablespoon ghee
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Directions

  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the avocado oil, lemon juice, garlic, and the leaves of rosemary, sage, and oregano. Taste and adjust the seasoning with the salt and pepper before adding the wings. Mix thoroughly and add the chicken wings. Cover and refrigerate the wings 24 hours to marinate them.
  2. Preheat oven to 425ºF (218ºC), and line a baking sheet with foil.
  3. Remove the wings from the marinade and discard it. Roast the wings in the oven for 15 minutes. Use tongs to turn over the wings and bake for another 15-20 minutes depending on level of crispiness you want.
  4. Meanwhile, in a cast iron skillet over medium heat, sauté the shallots in ghee until soft.
  5. Add the white wine, chicken stock, and lemon juice and bring it to a boil, stirring the sauce as it reduces. Add the wings to the skillet and toss for 1-2 minutes until they're well coated.
  6. Serve immediately!

Notes

*Use 2 extra tablespoons chicken stock if you're avoiding wine or for Whole30.

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