Tag Archives: whole30

Paleo Mango Jalapeño Dressing Recipe

Paleo Mango Jalapeño Dressing Recipe | stupideasypaleo.com

I’m still rolling out teaser recipes from my new cookbook, The Performance Paleo Cookbook, and today it’s Paleo Mango Jalapeño Dressing.

I got quite the awesome surprise when I was told that my little cookbook was in the Top 100 of ALL non-fiction books last week. That’s so crazy! It wouldn’t be possible without your support. So to say thanks, here’s another recipe from the cookbook for you to enjoy. If you’ve enjoyed it, would you do me a huge favor and pop over to Amazon to leave a quick review? Even a sentence or two will be a big help!

If you’d like to see the others I’ve shared, click for Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak, Hasselback Sweet Potatoes with Herb Ghee, and Smoked Salmon Egg Bake.

From The Performance Paleo Cookbook

Sweet, tangy and a little bit spicy

This dressing was a happy coincidence. When I was developing my Crunchy Slaw With Chicken (page 158), I wanted to add some sweet and spice. Instead of adding chopped mango and jalapeño, I threw it all into the blender and came up with this dressing. It’s surprisingly creamy, and you can customize the heat level by keeping more or less of the jalapeño seeds. It’s perfect for dipping chicken into or as a topping for fish tacos.

Creamy Mango Jalapeño Dressing: Performance Paleo Cookbook
Prep time: 
Total time: 

Serves: Serves 4
 

Ingredients
  • 1 cup (92 g) mango, fresh or frozen
  • Zest of 1 lime
  • 6 tbsp (90 mL) lime juice
  • 2 tbsp (30 mL) light-tasting olive oil
  • 1 jalapeño pepper, stem removed
  • 1⁄2 tsp sea salt
  • 1⁄4 tsp fish sauce

Instructions
  1. Combine all the ingredients in a high-powered blender or food processor and blend until smooth.

Notes
If you add the entire jalapeño pepper—seeds and inner white membrane— the dressing will be medium to spicy.

TOTAL RECIPE MACRONUTRIENTS (IN GRAMS PER SERVING)

PROTEIN TRACE

FAT 7G

TOTAL CARB 10G

NET CARB 9G

Pin this!

Paleo Mango Jalapeño Dressing Recipe | stupideasypaleo.com

What’s your favorite recipe from The Performance Paleo Cookbook so far?

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes with Herb Ghee Recipe

 

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes with Compound Herb Ghee Recipe | stupideasypaleo.com

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes with Compound Herb Ghee is another tasty recipe preview I’m sharing from newly released cookbook, The Performance Paleo Cookbook

The cookbook came out last week and already I’m seeing so many of your pictures on Instagram and around social media. It’s an absolute thrill to have so much fantastic support, and I’m really glad you’re loving the recipes!

Right now, I’m on book tour with Ciarra Hannah of Popular Paleo. We’re speaking in Salt Lake City today and next weekend we’ll be in Dallas, Austin, Phoenix and San Diego. Come out and see us!

This recipe may sound fancy of complicated, but it’s totally not. There are six ingredients (not counting the sea salt), and it can be roasting in the oven on your weekly cook up day or while you’re getting the rest of dinner prepared.

From The Performance Paleo Cookbook

Deliciously roasted sweet potatoes with a dollop of healthy fat

Hasselback potatoes originated in Sweden, and they make basic roasted spuds special. When roasted in the oven, the fan-shaped cuts get crispy and delicious. Top these sweet potatoes with a compound butter of ghee and fresh herbs for a sophisticated finish.

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes with Compound Herb Ghee: Performance Paleo Cookbook
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

Serves: Serves 2 to 4
 

Ingredients
  • 1 lb (454 g) white sweet potatoes
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) melted ghee
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 2 tbsp (30 g) ghee
  • 1 small clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp fresh chopped rosemary, about 1 sprig
  • 1 tsp fresh thyme, about 5 sprigs

Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F/204°C and line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper. Scrub the skin of the sweet potatoes thoroughly. Use a very sharp knife to make several vertical cuts from the top of the sweet potatoes most of the way through, stopping about ¼ inch/6 millimeters from the bottom. Place the sweet potatoes on the baking sheet. Brush with the melted ghee and sprinkle the sea salt on top. Roast for 60 to 75 minutes, until the sweet potatoes are soft.
  2. Meanwhile, make the compound ghee. In a small bowl, combine the ghee, garlic, rosemary and thyme. Stir well with a spoon until it forms a soft mixture. Top the hot roasted sweet potatoes with the compound ghee.

Notes
Try white potatoes instead of sweet potatoes if you desire. In this recipe, I make an exception about not eating the skin because it’s so crispy.

TOTAL RECIPE MACRONUTRIENTS (IN GRAMS PER SERVING)

PROTEIN 2G

FAT 10G

TOTAL CARB 21G

NET CARB 19G

Pin this!
Hasselback Sweet Potatoes with Compound Herb Ghee Recipe | stupideasypaleo.com

 

Do you love sweet potatoes? Have you tried Hasselback potatoes yet?

The Performance Paleo Cookbook is Here! Plus Two New Resources!

The Performance Paleo Cookbook is here!

After so many months of writing, cooking, photographing, editing and waiting, I can proudly say the day has finally arrived. The book I’ve poured my heart into is now in stores and making its way out into the world. Countless folks have posted up pictures of the cookbook in their hands today, and it’s been absolutely surreal.

It’s so hard to sum up what this day has meant to me. You’ve encouraged me and waited patiently as I blogged less to write more in the middle part of 2014. You’ve given me feedback and answered the questions that helped me craft a book that would be a better resource for you. It’s because of you that there even is a Performance Paleo Cookbook. My heart is so full.

In short, thank you.

To show my gratitude, I’ve developed two free printable PDF lists to go along with The Performance Paleo Cookbook. One lists Whole30-friendly recipes and the other AIP-friendly recipes. I know how important it is to have flexibility with food options if you’re on a modified nutrition plan.

Click the images below—or their respective links—to view, download and save these guides for free. Print them out for handy reference!

Whole30 Recipes in The Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Click here to download the Whole30 list.

AIP Recipes in The Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Click here to download the AIP list.

And if you haven’t ordered your copy of The Performance Paleo Cookbook yet, I’d love to show you more of the features, so head on over here for that.

If you have purchased a copy, I’d be so grateful if you would take a couple minutes and leave a review on Amazon. It helps folks decide whether the book is right for them!

Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins Recipe

Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins are a great pre-workout snack or quick breakfast! They’re loaded with veggies, and they’re gluten- and dairy-free. If you’re doing a Whole30, they’re 100% Whole30-friendly.

Breakfast can be the toughest meal of the day to get organized with, and my go-to tip for quick morning eats is to steam a dozen eggs on your weekly cook-up day. But sometimes, I get tired of just plain eggs, and these little Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins are the perfect solution.

Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins | stupideasypaleo.com

I started making egg muffins a couple years ago, and they can be done in a multitude of ways: Add meat and switch up the veggies and spices! You’ll be amazed how many interesting combinations you can come up with. These particular Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins would be great with some browned sausage mixed in, too.

If you don’t have Flavor God Pizza Seasoning—which I realize is quite possible—just substitute it for the spices listed in the Notes section of the recipe. Have fun with it! Even the cat thought they smelled good.

Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins | stupideasypaleo.com

4.8 from 5 reviews

Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

Serves: Makes 12
 

Ingredients
  • 8 oz sliced mushrooms
  • 2 tsp coconut oil
  • 1 cup chopped cooked broccoli
  • ¼ cup sliced black olives
  • 8 large eggs
  • 2 tbsp coconut milk
  • 1 tbsp Flavor God Pizza Seasoning*
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • ¼ tsp black pepper

Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350F. Line a 12-cup muffin tray with liners and grease them. I use silicone liners like these and grease them lightly with coconut oil. Set aside.
  2. In a medium skillet over medium-high heat, melt the coconut oil. Add the mushrooms, cooking and stirring until the moisture is drawn out and the mushrooms begin to brown slightly, about 8 minutes. Turn off the heat and add the broccoli and black olives. Stir to combine.
  3. In a large bowl, beat the eggs with the coconut milk, pizza seasoning, salt and pepper.
  4. Spoon the veggie mixture evenly into the muffin liners. They should be about ⅔ full. Now, pour the egg mixture evenly into the muffin liners until it’s about ¾ full.
  5. Bake the egg muffins for 20 to 25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the middle comes out cleanly.

Notes
*If you don’t have Flavor God Pizza Seasoning, use 1 tsp garlic powder + ¼ tsp dried basil + ¼ tsp dried oregano.

 

Are you doing a Whole30 this January? Let me know in the comments below!

Pin this!

Paleo Pizza Egg Muffins | stupideasypaleo.com

Looking for more pre-workout recipe ideas?

Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

 

Smoked Salmon Egg Bake Recipe

Smoked Salmon Egg Bake from Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

I’m so excited to share this recipe for Smoked Salmon Egg Bake with you. It’s another sneak peek from The Performance Paleo Cookbook which releases to the world in just a bit over a week!

I know how important previews can be, especially when there are so many new books are coming out. You want to pick the one that’s right for you. That’s why I’ll be sharing five recipes from Performance Paleo Cookbook so you can try before you buy! With the New Year coming soon, I’m confident this is the best cookbook out there to support your commitment to exercise / training…because we all know you can’t out-train a poor diet.

Without further adieu,…

From The Performance Paleo Cookbook

Smoked Salmon Egg Bake

Portable pre-workout protein with a smoked salmon twist

With their protein and healthy fat profile, eggs make a fantastic pre-workout food. They’re rich in essential nutrients like vitamin D, choline and folate and are a relatively inexpensive way to incorporate more protein into your diet. In this recipe, I bumped up the veggie content with the zucchini and green onions. Cut into squares, and take them with you on the go!

5.0 from 1 reviews

Smoked Salmon Egg Bake: Performance Paleo Cookbook
Serves: Serves 6
 

Ingredients
  • 1 tsp + 1 tbsp (15 mL) coconut oil
  • 1 lb (454 g) zucchini, shredded
  • 3 green onions (2 oz [57 g]), white and light green parts, thinly sliced
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • 8 large eggs, beaten
  • 1 tsp dried dill
  • 4 oz (113 g) smoked salmon, chopped

Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F/177°C and grease an 8-inch x 8-inch/20-centimeter x 20-centimeter baking dish with 1 teaspoon coconut oil.
  2. Now sweat the zucchini and green onions. Heat a large skillet over medium heat, then add 1 tablespoon/15 milliliters coconut oil. Add the zucchini, green onions, salt and pepper. Cook and stir until the veggies are wilted and lightly browned. You want most of the moisture to cook off , about 6 to 8 minutes. Let the mixture cool.
  3. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, beat the eggs together with the dill, then mix in the smoked salmon. When the zucchini and green onions are cool, add them to the eggs and stir until everything is well combined. Pour the mixture into the baking dish. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until the center is set and not liquid.

Notes
TOTAL RECIPE MACRONUTRIENTS (IN GRAMS PER SERVING)

PROTEIN 13G

FAT 11G

TOTAL CARB 3G

NET CARB 2G

Pre-order now through through AmazonBarnes & NobleiTunesGoogle Play or IndieBound!

Pin this!

Smoked Salmon Egg Bake from Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Brussels Sprouts, Blueberry & Bacon Salad Recipe

Paleo Brussels, Blueberry & Bacon Salad | stupideasypaleo.com This Paleo Brussels Sprouts, Blueberry and Bacon Salad was inspired by a dish at our local grub establishment, and it’s full of awesome flavors: crisp Brussels, sweet blueberries, savory bacon and a tangy lemon tarragon dressing. Got your attention?

Paleo Brussels, Blueberry & Bacon Salad | stupideasypaleo.com

What’s even better is that this Paleo Brussels Sprouts, Blueberry and Bacon Salad is easy to scale up and bring to a party or potluck, and it’s pretty simple to make. If you can’t find dried blueberries without a bunch of added sugar, fresh will work just fine.

Paleo Brussels, Blueberry & Bacon Salad
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

Serves: Serves 4
 

Ingredients
For the Salad
  • 3 strips thick cut bacon
  • 1 lb (454 g)Brussels sprouts
  • ⅓ cup (60 g) dried blueberries
  • ¼ cup (25 g) chopped walnuts
For the Dressing
  • 3 tbsp (45 mL) lemon juice
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped finely
  • ½ tsp dried tarragon
  • ¼ tsp dried mustard
  • ¼ tsp sea salt
  • ⅛ tsp black pepper
  • ¼ cup (60 mL) light-tasting olive oil or avocado oil

Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350F (177C) and line a baking sheet with foil. Lay the bacon strips on the foil. You may want to season the bacon by sprinkling it with a little garlic powder. Bake the bacon until it’s crispy but not burned, around 15 to 20 minutes. Set it aside to cool, and chop it.
  2. To prep the Brussels sprouts, peel off any damaged outer leaves. Using a sharp knife, carefully slice the sprouts thinly. I like to think about making 4 to 6 slices per sprout. The thinner the better. Place those in a large bowl.
  3. Add in the blueberries and walnuts.
  4. In a medium bowl, combine the lemon juice, garlic, tarragon, mustard, salt and pepper. Whisk to combine, then drizzle in the oil while whisking until it’s evenly mixed. Pour the dressing over the salad and toss everything well to combine. Top with the bacon.

Notes
Use fresh blueberries instead of dried if you prefer. This recipe is Whole30-friendly if you use sugar free bacon and blueberries without added sugar.

 

What’s your favorite recipe for Brussels sprouts?

Pin this photo!

Paleo Brussels, Blueberry & Bacon Salad | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast Recipe

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com This recipe for Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast is easy enough to do on a weeknight, but special enough for a special holiday table.

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com

Traditionally, pork loin is stuffed with bread stuffing, but I’ve kept this Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast super flavorful with a mixture of dried tart cherries, sweet dried apricots, tender walnuts, and earthy sage. With a basic technique, you’ll butterfly the pork loin to flatten the meat and make it perfect for stuffing and rolling. Pounding the meat so it’s uniformly flat after you’ve cut it will make rolling the meat easier.

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com

Since pork loin is a very lean cut of meat, I recommend cooking it with the fat side up to help keep it moist. You could even serve it with a simple Paleo herb gravy (like this one from Nom Nom Paleo) for extra credit points. Remember to ask your butcher for some twine when you buy your roast—most will be happy to give you a small amount on the house.

When I got my four pound roast home, I discovered it was actually two smaller pieces tied together by the butcher (oops!). I just rolled with it and did two roasts that were smaller.

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com

Here’s how to make your Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast…

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

Serves: Serves 8
 

Ingredients
  • 4 lb (1814 g) pork loin roast
  • 1 c (100 g) chopped walnuts
  • ½ c (100 g) dried apricots*, chopped
  • ½ c (75 g) tart dried cherries*
  • 15 fresh sage leaves, roughly chopped
  • 2 tsp (14 g) fine sea salt
  • 1 tsp (5 g) ground black pepper

Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 375F (191C). Line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper.
  2. Prepare the pork loin roast by butterflying or cutting it in a roll fashion. Here’s how to cut it in a roll so the meat looks beautiful and spiraled when you cut into it. You may want to pound the meat so it’s uniformly flat. Set it aside and prepare the filling.
  3. In a small bowl, mix the walnuts, dried apricots, dried cherries and sage.
  4. With the meat lying open, sprinkle about half the salt and pepper on the inside. Now, place the filling on the meat in one layer. You’ll want to stay away from the edges so the filling won’t fall out when you roll it.
  5. Starting with the thinnest end toward you, roll the meat up carefully. Place the rolled edge down and the fat up. Wrap butcher’s twine around the roast every few inches so it doesn’t open up during roasting.
  6. Roast the pork for approximately 40-50 minutes or until a thermometer inserted into the meat reads 145F (63C). Allow the roast to cool for about 10 minutes, then slice it into rounds with a sharp knife.

Notes
*Look for dried fruit that in unsweetened when possible.

 

Paleo Stuffed Pork Loin Roast | stupideasypaleo.com

What’s your favorite meat for your holiday table? Tell me in the comments below!

Paleo or Whole30: Which Is Better?

Paleo or Whole30: Which is better?

It’s a question I get a lot. I’m answering it for you today so that you can go forward with confidence and select the best nutrition approach for yourself—especially if you’re planning to kick off the New Year with a renewed focus to eat better.

A Bit About Paleo First

Paleo is a way of eating focusing on real, whole, minimally processed foods. Foods that support gut health, hormonal balance, stable energy, and lean body mass. The stars of the show are meat, seafood, and eggs; veggies and fruit; and healthy fats. Most people start with a yes and no list of foods to eat and avoid, respectively.

Yes: Meat, seafood, and eggs; veggies and fruit; and healthy fats.

No: Grains, legumes, dairy, added sugars, processed foods, and salt. (There are others.)

Five years ago when I first started eating this way (on January 10, 2010 to be exact), the list of what was and wasn’t Paleo was pretty fixed across the board. It was easy to find a lot of consistency from book to book or website to website.

My, my…how things have changed.

Now it’s anyone’s guess, especially when every nutrient-poor baked good under the sun and processed / packaged food is now labeled with the “P” word because it’s “technically” Paleo. It’s kind of a mess, especially for newbies.

One site says white potatoes are okay. Another says to avoid them like the plague. One book says never, ever salt your food. The world replies back with, “But some salt makes food taste good.” Confusing, right?

While a yes / no list is a decent way to start your Paleo lifestyle and wrap your brain around it, it’s no way to live the rest of your life.

And, it’s not the smartest idea either. Why? Here’s an example.

Athletes need more carbohydrate than sedentary folks. By adhering to extremely low carbohydrate Paleo approaches and training extremely hard, many athletes have gotten into hot water with their cortisol levels, thyroid health, and poor performance (to name a few). Applying one Paleo protocol across the board where everyone eats the same exact thing—with disregard for life context, goals, health history, etc.—can have negative implications over time.

Another example. My husband’s been Paleo since 2007, but in the last couple years, he’s battled skin irritation like eczema around his eyes and elbows. Trial and error seemed to link it to certain foods like beef and eggs, but after much research, he narrowed it to a histamine intolerance. Eating a lot of fermented veggies, kombucha, leftover meat, bone broth and even certain vegetables—all foods widely lauded and encouraged in a Paleo diet—actually made his symptoms worse.

Long story short, you are an individual and context matters, which is why you need to learn about yourself and your relationship with food. That’s where Whole30 comes in.

Get Your Learn On With Whole30

[Note: I am an Envoy Extraordinaire for Whole30, which means I help educate the community and answer questions about the program.]

Whole30 is a month long elimination plan that’s been described more than once as “squeaky clean Paleo.” Dallas and Melissa Hartwig created this strategy to help people learn about their relationships with potentially problematic foods, then develop a plan for which foods to avoid long-term and which to reintroduce.

You see, we don’t all react to foods in the same ways. Me? I had a really tough time with sugar. Even after 18 months of Paleo eating, I couldn’t shake it. It consumed me. I wanted to stop eating sweets and craving junk food, but I was stuck. Even notoriously “healthy” foods like dried fruit were irresistible to me. I could slam back a whole bag of Trader Joe’s dried mango in about 10 minutes, then go back for more.

In 2011, I did my first Whole30 which required me to cut out all added sugar. (And, I avoided dried fruit because I knew it was a trigger food.) By the end, I had broken the cycle. Something I struggled with my WHOLE LIFE no longer had a grip on me.

Was I allergic to sugar? No. Do I have a sugar sensitivity? Maybe, but it depends on how you define that. Did I have a bad psychological relationship with it? Eff yeah, I did. What you learn about yourself during and after a Whole30 might surprise you.

So, completing a Whole30 will give you valuable, personalized feedback about which foods affect you positively / negatively, then allow you to make informed modifications to a Paleo approach for life. Sounds cool, right? You get to drive your boat based on how foods make you feel, not because of what some yes / no list you read five years ago told you to eat.

To Summarize…

Paleo or Whole30: Which is better? The answer is neither. They’re just different. They both serve their own purposes and have distinct goals.

The simple solution: Do a Whole30 at the start of your Paleo journey so you know how to better eat Paleo for life.

Paleo is a long-term nutrition and lifestyle strategy where nutrient-dense foods are encouraged, but inflammatory, nutrient-poor foods are avoided.

Whole30 is a short-term, very strict program designed to help you learn about which foods may be problematic for you. You can then apply what you learn to a slightly looser, less strict (but very much informed) Paleo approach to eating for life.

Whole30 Resources To Help You Plan for January 1

1: Get a copy of It Starts with Food. It’s really easy to read, and it’ll set clear guidelines for you. (Plus it has a ton of tasty recipes from Mel Joulwan of Well Fed and Well Fed 2.) No time or dinero to get one? You can read about the program on the Whole30 website here. Not sure if you should get the book? Check out my review here: 5 Reasons to Read It Starts with Food.

2: I’ve tagged every recipe from the blog that’s Whole30-friendly (over 100 to date) for easy searching in the Recipe Index. If it says W30, it’s made from Whole30-friendly ingredients. There are hundreds!

3: My Whole30 Pinterest board. Love to pin? You can find all my Whole30 recipe pins (plus other photos and videos) by clicking here: Stupid Easy Paleo Whole30 Pinterest Board.

4: My Whole30 video tips! You can find them on the Stupid Easy Paleo YouTube channel or by clicking the blog posts here: 5 Tips for a Successful Whole30 and 5 More Tips for a Successful Whole30.

5: Other awesome bloggers who’ve written about Whole30: Nom Nom Paleo and The Clothes Make the Girl just to name a couple rockstars! Click on their blog names for kickass Whole30 posts, including recipes. Mel’s got another newly updated post here: 30 Reasons to Whole30 with lots of good stuff AND her Week 1 Meal Plan with yummies like her famous Chocolate Chili and Sunshine Sauce!

6: My Stupid Easy Paleo Guide to Clean-Eating Challenges (It’s free!)

7: The Whole30 forum. A free forum dedicated to all topics Whole30-related. Click here to join.

Still got questions about Paleo or Whole30? Leave them in the comments below, and I’ll get back to you!

Paleo or Whole30: Which is Better? | stupideasypaleo.com

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak: Performance Paleo Cookbook

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak: Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak is the first recipe preview I’m sharing with you from my soon-to-be-released cookbook, The Performance Paleo Cookbook

With less than one month before it comes out on January 6, 2015, I’ve gotten the go-ahead to start posting a few exclusive recipes here on the site to get your taste buds working! I’m starting off with a bang with this uber-tasty and flavor party of a dish, Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak.

I am so, SO excited to be nearly to release day. You’ve supported me through the better part of a year on this cookbook journey, and I know you’ll love the food. Remember to pre-order for the best savings!

From The Performance Paleo Cookbook

Tender-Asian Marinated Flank Steak

Flank steak is a really special piece of meat and when prepared well, its melt-in-your-mouth tender. Because it can be somewhat tough, there are some tricks I use to make it more delicate, like marinating it for several hours to break down the tough fibers, cooking it at really high heat to sear it and lock in the juices and slicing it against the grain. Set it up to go the night before or in the morning before you leave for work, and all youll have to do is cook it when you get home! Serve it on top of a tossed green salad with some avocado for a nourishing, complete meal.

Serves 2

Ingredients for Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak from The Performance Paleo Cookbook

  • 1 lb (454 g) flank steak
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed
  • 1” (2.5 cm) piece ginger, peeled and sliced into thin coins
  • 3 green onions (2 oz [57 g]), white and light green parts, roughly chopped
  • ¼ cup (59 mL) coconut aminos
  • 2 tbsp (30 mL) lime juice
  • 2 tsp (10 mL) dark sesame oil
  • 1 tsp fish sauce
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) coconut oil

Directions for Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak from The Performance Paleo Cookbook

Combine all the ingredients except for the coconut oil in a plastic zip-top bag or a medium bowl. Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours. Longer is definitely better, up to 24 hours. Remove the meat and pat it dry. Discard the marinade.

Heat a skillet to medium-high heat and add the coconut oil. When it shimmers, add the steak, and sear for 3 minutes until a golden brown crust has formed. Flip the steak and sear the other side for 3 minutes. Then turn the heat down to medium-low and cook until it’s to your preference, about 4 more minutes for medium.

Let rest on a cutting board for at least 5 minutes before slicing. Cut into thin strips, against the grain (muscle fibers). It’ll be really tender that way.

Try This: Instead of pan-searing the steak, grill it.

TOTAL RECIPE MACRONUTRIENTS (IN GRAMS PER SERVING)

PROTEIN 45G

FAT 36G

TOTAL CARB 12G

NET CARB 11G

Pre-order now through through AmazonBarnes & NobleiTunesGoogle Play or IndieBound!

Tender Asian-Marinated Flank Steak: Performance Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata Recipe

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata is one of my favorite post-workout foods because it’s 1) packed with protein and 2) totally portable. In fact, it’s totally representative of the tasty post-workout bites in my upcoming cookbook, The Performance Paleo Cookbook! (It comes out in just a little over a month, and it’s still on pre-order for 25 off!)

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

My pal Jesse from Whitford Foundry came down to the house today to film a video teaser for the cookbook, and I needed to whip something up as my “prep at home, take to the gym” dish. This fit the bill perfectly.

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

Normally, I like to keep post-workout food pretty low in fat—which slows digestion—but eggs are a great tradeoff for busy folks. The lean chicken bumps up the protein content, and I added sweet potato for a good carb boost.

Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients for Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata

  • 9 large eggs, beaten
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) coconut oil or ghee
  • 1 large roasted sweet potato, cooled and roughly chopped*
  • 12 oz (340 g) lean ground chicken
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1 small head broccoli, stem removed, chopped small

Directions for Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F (177°C).
  2. In a large bowl, beat the eggs together with the smoked paprika, salt and pepper. Mix in the chopped sweet potato. Set aside.
  3. In a large cast iron skillet over medium-high heat, add the coconut oil. Then, sauté the chicken until it’s cooked through, about 4 minutes. Remove to a separate bowl.
  4. In the same skillet, add the onion and broccoli and sauté on medium heat until they are softened and slightly tender, about 6 to 8 minutes. Now, add the cooked chicken back to the pan.
  5. Pour the egg mixture into the skillet. Turn off the heat and stir the ingredients to combine.
  6. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until the eggs are set and not runny.
  7. Serve directly from the skillet or slice and store for leftovers.

*My weekly big food prep involves roasting half a dozen sweet potatoes. I line a baking sheet with foil, place the washed and unpeeled sweet potatoes on it, and get that into a 400°F (204°C) oven for about 45 minutes. I cool them, then store them in the fridge. When it’s time to use them, I just peel them! (The peels loosen right up after they cool.)

Remember to check out my cookbook! It comes out on January 6th!

Click here to pin this!

Paleo Chicken Sweet Potato Frittata | stupideasypaleo.com

Tuesday Night Chicken Recipe

Tuesday Night Chicken—The Frugal Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: This recipe comes to you courtesy of my personal friend and fellow Paleo blogger / author, Ciarra Hannah of Popular Paleo. Her new cookbook, The Frugal Paleo Cookbook—all about eating delicious, flavorful Paleo food without breaking the bank—comes out on December 2, 2014!

She’s giving you a sneak peek with this tasty recipe for Tuesday Night Chicken. If you’re down for saving money while eating Paleo, you need this book. Plus, if you pre-order before December 2, you’ll get a free bonus package chock full of awesome info and coupons. Take it away Ciarra!

Truthfully this could be named after any day of the week. It’s so approachable and affordable that you won’t hesitate to make it after a long day at work or just before payday hits. This recipe highlights my favorite way to cook a rich tomato sauce quickly: red chili flakes and cinnamon. It’s how my Italian grandmother fed our family, so naturally I consider it the right way, as any true Italian would. Enjoy using these straightforward ingredients to create a bold and flavorful classic Italian dinner…any night of the week.

Serves 2 to 4

Ingredients for Tuesday Night Chicken

  • 2 large skinless, boneless chicken breasts (about 1 pound [454 g])
  • 1 tsp (5 g) House Seasoning Blend (see below)
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup (150 g) diced white or yellow onion
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 batch Italian Seasoning Blend (see below)
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 (14.5 oz [411 g]) can fire-roasted tomatoes
  • Fresh basil and/or flat-leaf parsley for garnish

For the House Seasoning Blend

For the Italian Seasoning Blend

Directions for Tuesday Night Chicken

Prepare the chicken breasts first by filleting lengthwise to make 2 thick breasts into 4 thinner ones. Dust both sides with the House Seasoning Blend.

Heat a high-sided skillet over medium-high heat and add a little bit of olive oil to the pan—enough to just coat the bottom. When the oil is hot, lay the seasoned chicken breasts in to sear. Work in batches to avoid overcrowding the pan as overcrowding leads to steaming, not browning. When the chicken has been seared (note, not fully cooked) on both sides, transfer it to a plate and set aside.

Reduce the temperature to medium and replenish the pan with a little more olive oil if it looks dry. Add the onion, garlic, Italian Seasoning Blend, kosher salt and cinnamon and cook, stirring often. If you are not accustomed to building sauces this way, I know it may appear a bit strange, but trust me on this. Applying heat and oil to the dried herbs prior to immersing in liquid revives the oils and creates a deeper flavor. It’s the trick to crafting a rich tomato sauce in such a short amount of time.

Cook until the onion is translucent and the garlic and herbs fragrant. Pour in the fire-roasted tomatoes and mix together. When the sauce bubbles, add the par-cooked chicken back to the pan, nestle it into the spiced-tomato-goodness, cover and reduce the temperature to a simmer.

Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes while chopping the fresh garnishes—use either or both basil or flat-leaf parsley. This final simmer also allows plenty of time to whip up a quick vegetable side like an easy salad, sautéed dark leafy greens or Pan-Roasted Cauliflower & Zucchini, which is available on page 157 of the book or here on www.PopularPaleo.com.

I like to serve this directly from the pan after scattering with the vibrant green fresh herbs.

Love this recipe? Pre-order The Frugal Paleo Cookbook here!

Click here to pin this!

Tuesday Night Chicken—The Frugal Paleo Cookbook | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question about this recipe? Leave it in the comments below, and we’ll get back to you!

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash Recipe

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash doubles as a hearty fall dinner or a great game day appetizer. It takes a little advance planning because the pork gets the low and slow treatment in the slow cooker, but the meat can be made a day ahead of time and reheated after the squash is roasted. Or, just make the meat itself! There are tons of options here. If you omit the honey, this recipe is Whole30-friendly and just as tasty.

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com

Delicata squash are cylindrical and generally smaller than a butternut. You’ll recognize them by their yellow skin with long green stripes. The skin is thin and edible, the flesh creamy and a bit sweet. You can even experiment with different types of squash if you can’t find delicata—acorn would work well—but instead of four, you’ll probably only need two. I slice the squash boats in halves or thirds for appetizer portions or keep them whole for dinner. Serve with a side salad or some roasted veggies for a complete meal.

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com

If you’re ever interested in checking out the pastured pork from 5280 Meat in Colorado, my readers get 10% off any order with the code SEPaleo.

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash
Prep time: 
Total time: 

 

Ingredients
  • 3 lb (1361 g) pork shoulder or pork butt
  • 2 tsp (10 g) fine sea salt
  • ¼ cup (60 mL) stone ground mustard, divided in half
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) raw honey (omit for Whole30)
  • ¼ tsp cayenne pepper
  • 4 small delicata squash, halved and seeded
  • 2 tbsp (15 mL) melted fat or oil of choice
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  • Chopped parsley, for garnish

Instructions
  1. You’ll make this recipe in two parts. First, make the pulled pork because it needs 8 hours in the slow cooker. Overnight works really well.
  2. Place the pork shoulder in the slow cooker, then rub all over with the salt and half the mustard (about 2 tablespoons / 30 mL). Cover and cook on low for 8 hours. Remove the meat, place in a bowl and shred with two forks. (The cooking liquid can get quite salty which is why I don’t shred it in the slow cooker itself.) Mix in the other half of the mustard, the honey and the cayenne pepper.
  3. About 45 minutes before you want to serve the food, get the squash roasting in the oven. This can be done ahead of time, too, and then everything can be reheated.
  4. Preheat the oven to 400F (204C). Line a baking sheet with parchment or foil. Arrange the squash halves on the sheet with the empty boat side facing up, and drizzle with the melted fat or oil. Sprinkle with some salt and pepper, then roast for about 30-40 minutes or until the squash is tender and starting to lightly brown.

Notes
If you’re doing Whole30, check labels on the mustard and omit the honey.

Nutrition Information
Serving size: Serves 4 to 6

Click here to pin this recipe for Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash!

Paleo Pulled Pork Stuffed Squash | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question? Leave it in the comments below.

Pomegranate Habanero Shredded Beef Recipe: Paleo & Whole30

Pomegranate Habanero Shredded Beef | stupideasypaleo.com

The flavors of fall always inspire me. Roasted root vegetables, soups and stews, and slow-cooked roasts are highlights, meant to warm you up on a cold day. Pomegranates are coming into season now, so I decided to make a beef roast with the juice—for a bit of sweetness—and balanced it out with some heat from the habanero pepper. (I get the juice with no added sugar.) Customize to how spicy you like it. If you want it hotter, leave in the seeds or use jalapeño pepper instead.

Pomegranate Habanero Shredded Beef | stupideasypaleo.com

I used my Dutch oven, but I’m sure you could make it in the slow cooker…I just haven’t tested it yet! Be sure to use a cut of beef roast with enough fat so it turns out tender and not dry. If you’re ever interested in checking out the grass-fed beef from 5280 Meat in Colorado, my readers get 10% off any order with the code SEPaleo.

Pomegranate Habanero Shredded Beef | stupideasypaleo.com

Pomegranate Jalapeño Shredded Beef—Paleo & Whole30
Prep time: 
Total time: 

Serves: Serves 4 to 6
 

Ingredients

Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 325F (163C). Pat the roast VERY dry with paper towels and season with the salt. You want the meat to be very dry so that a nice crust will form when you sear it. Otherwise the surface will steam instead of brown.
  2. Heat a Dutch oven over medium-high heat, then add the ghee. (Ghee is great for searing meat because it has such a high smoke point.) Sear all sides for about 4 to 6 minutes each or until a golden brown crust forms.
  3. Turn off the heat, and add the habanero (or jalapeño), beef broth, and pomegranate juice. Put the lid on the Dutch oven and put the pot into the oven.
  4. Bake for about 3 hrs or until the meat is very tender. Shred with two forks. It’s great served over roasted sweet potatoes. Bonus points for serving with a drizzle of pomegranate reduction. To make that, pour ½ cup pomegranate juice into a small pot. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer until the juice has reduced by about half and coats the back of a spoon. Just keep an eye on it because it can burn quite easily. If you’re on Whole30 I would avoid the reduction because of sugar content.

Click here to pin this recipe for Pomegranate Habanero Shredded Beef—Paleo & Whole30!

Pomegranate Habanero Shredded Beef | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question? Leave it in the comments below!

5 Questions With My Paleo Shero: Mel Joulwan

5 Questions with Mel Joulwan | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: Every once in a while, I share interviews with some of the amazing people I’ve been lucky enough to get to know in this community. I am beyond excited to interview my friend Mel Joulwan, totally badass creator of the blog The Clothes Make the Girl and author of two amazing cookbooks: Well Fed and Well Fed 2. She’s cooked up some of the most well-loved Paleo / Whole30 recipes EVER (um, hello Chocolate Chili and Homemade Paleo Mayo) and completely lives the lifestyle. I’m a die-hard fan, and still hoping that one day, her, Nom Nom Paleo and I will dress up as Charlie’s Angels for Halloween. Please enjoy!

I know a lot about you Mel, but can you tell newbies about who you are and what you do?

I’m a book nerd who plays classical piano. Along the way to being a grown up,  I fell in love with punk rock music, leopard print, and cooking. I also played flat track roller derby. If you look me up on Amazon, you’ll find Rollergirl: Totally True Tales From The Track (my book about my Derby days), Living Paleo For Dummies, and my cookbooks Well Fed: Paleo Recipes For People Who Love To Eat and Well Fed 2: More Paleo Recipes For People Who Love To Eat. (You’re welcome to download free samples of our books: Well Fed and Well Fed 2.)

5 Questions with Mel Joulwan | stupideasypaleo.com

I have a blog called The Clothes Make The Girl where I write about my triumphs and failures in the gym, in the kitchen, and in life. I like to pretend I’m a badass so I workout at KDR Fitness  (where they have me lift heavy things over and over and over, sometimes quickly.) I also enjoy frequent soaks in epsom salts, walk 10,000 steps almost every day, and meditate. I’ve seen every episode of the original Law & Order at least three times (not an exaggeration), and my favorite book is Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (not to be confused with books by Jane Austen.)

5 Questions with Mel Joulwan | stupideasypaleo.com

If you were stuck on a desert island (with a fridge), what 3 foods would you choose to have around?

A jar of Sunbutter, so I’d always have a sweet treat. (Plus, it would taste great on the bananas I’m going to assume are growing on the beach of my island.)

A jar of Thai red curry paste so I could turn the fish I’d catch and the coconuts I’d find into a luscious curry.

A bottle of champagne because…screw it! I’m stuck on a desert island! I’m having a little bubbly once in a while.

(This is all a lie. If I was on a desert island, I would wish I had Doritos, Fritos, and Jackson’s Honest Potato Chips.)

What’s your best time saving tip for making cooking at home less painful?

I have two tricks, and they’re both based on the helpful fact that I actually really love leftovers. Honestly, I think I enjoy leftover food more than the original meal. I know that makes me a weirdo.

1. I always cook a bunch of protein and veggies in advance. I grill chicken and brown ground beef. I partially steam broccoli, cabbage, green beans, Brussels sprouts…and I put everything in BPA-free containers in the fridge. When it’s time to eat, I heat some ghee or duck fat (OMG! Duck fat!) in a skillet, then add garlic and onion. When it’s soft, I plunk in protein and veggies, add some spices, and sauté everything until it’s caramelized. If I’ve done the prep of the protein and veggies in advance, the “make dinner” part takes only about 15 minutes.

2. My best secret weapon is homemade mayo. It takes about 3 minutes to make, and it makes everything you blop it on taste better. Grilled meat. Canned tuna. Raw veggies. Just add some spices and acid (lemon juice or vinegar) to the mayo and you instantly have a creamy dipping sauce.

What’s new on the horizon for The Clothes Make the Girl?

You heard it here first: We’re working on a site redesign that will be more visual to better highlight my recipes and a new structure that should make it easier to find recipes in the archive. We’re super excited to see how it all comes together. It should be launched in early 2015. Whew!

And…I’m working on recipes for our next cookbook. The theme is still a secret, but I can tell everyone this: The recipes will be internationally-inspired favorites with lots of spices — I could never give up my spice drawer! — but there’s also a new twist that I think people will really like. That’s all I can say about it for now. It should be out in early 2016.

I hear you’ve got these cool curated boxes of your favorite Mel things happening now…what’s that all about?

Quarterly is a really fun company that recruits people — like Pharrell Williams, Andrew Zimmern, Nina Garcia, Timothy Ferriss… and me (!) — to curate boxes of goodies that are sent to subscribers a few times a year. The first box I put together was a Paleo starter kit. It went out to 650 subscribers in September, and it was really fun to see the reactions online as people unboxed their care packages. (You can see what was in box EAT01 right here.)

For EAT02, the theme is “Good Morning,” and I’m really excited about the cool stuff that’s going to be in the box. Morning can be a stressful time for people, so EAT02 will be filled with hand-picked items to make mornings a little sweeter. My husband Dave and I collaborate on a hand-drawn letter and recipe for each box. In EAT01, we included an illustrated letter — my handwriting, Dave’s drawings — and a recipe for Snuggle Soup that I developed exclusively for the Quarterly box. We have some really fun ideas for the letter we’ll include in EAT02.

My goal with my Quarterly box is to always give my subscribers delicious things to eat and useful things that are delightful in some way. It’s a care package from me to them. To subscribe, head right on over here: http://on.qrtr.ly/paleobox.

5 Questions with Mel Joulwan | stupideasypaleo.com

 Click here to pin this!

5 Questions with Mel Joulwan | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question for Mel? Leave it in the comments below!

Butternut Squash Pasta Sauce Recipe: Paleo & Whole30

Butternut Squash "Pasta" Sauce—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

Sometimes, recipes are born out of necessity. My local market was sold out of a prepared butternut squash sauce, so I decided to make my own version. Of course, I had nothing to compared the taste to, but I’ll settle for “delicious” which is what I got.

Butternut Squash "Pasta" Sauce—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

This sauce uses butternut squash as the base, but adds in sautéed aromatics—similar to a classic mirepoix—to create a foundation of flavor. The red pepper gives it some body, and some tomato paste brings acidity without dominating and making it taste too tomato-y.

Butternut Squash "Pasta" Sauce—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

I served this over warmed zucchini noodles, but the possibilities are really endless!

Butternut Squash Pasta Sauce—Paleo & Whole30
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

 

Ingredients
  • 1 tbsp (15 g) ghee
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • ½ red pepper, seeded and diced
  • 1 stalk celery, diced
  • Pinch sea salt
  • 1 lb (454 g) butternut squash, peeled, halved, seeded and diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 3 tbsp (45 mL) tomato paste
  • ~3/4 cup (177 mL) water
  • Sea salt and pepper, to taste

Instructions
  1. First, get the aromatic veggie base going. In a large skillet over medium heat, warm the ghee. Add the onion, red pepper, celery and pinch of sea salt. Cook and stir until the veggies soften and lightly brown, about 8 minutes.
  2. Add the butternut squash cubes and garlic. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cover the skillet. Cook for another 10 minutes or so until the squash is tender. Stir a few times so nothing sticks. Turn off the heat and let the veggies cool for a few minutes.
  3. Then, add the veggies to a food processor or high speed blender with the tomato paste. Start with ½ cup (118 mL) water. Puree the veggies until they become a sauce. If it’s too thick, add water by the tablespoon. I found that ¾ cup (177 mL) water made a sauce that was somewhere between a thin soup and a thick puree. Of course, the moisture content of your veggies may vary so start with less and add more as you go.
  4. Season with sea salt and pepper to taste and warm in a small pot before serving.

Notes
Double the batch and freeze the extras for up to 1 month.

Nutrition Information
Serving size: Serves 3 to 4.

Click here to pin this!

Butternut Squash "Pasta" Sauce—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question? Leave it in the comments below!

Curried Kabocha Squash Soup Recipe: Paleo & Whole30

Curried Kabocha Squash Soup—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

Curried Kabocha Squash Soup is so stupid-easy to make with only five ingredients, and it’s the perfect way to celebrate my favorite fall squash. Kabocha—also called “buttercup” in other regions of the United States and simply “pumpkin” in other parts of the world—tastes like a mash up between butternut squash and sweet potato. It’s wonderfully tasty with a thin, edible skin, and it really shines when roasted. It’s recognizable by it’s mottled dark green skin and round shape.

Usually, I just slice it into semicircles and roast it in the oven. (The seeds are delicious roasted, too.) This time, though, I made a simple soup that’s the perfect accompaniment to any fall dinner. I think it’d pair really well with a basic roast chicken and a green salad. If you can’t find kabocha squash in your market, butternut makes a very good substitute.

Curried Kabocha Squash Soup—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

Curried Kabocha Squash Soup—Paleo & Whole30
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

Serves: Serves 3 to 4
 

Ingredients

Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400F (204C) and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or aluminum foil.
  2. Cut the bottom and top off the squash, then carefully cut it in half from top to bottom. Scoop out the seeds (you can save them and roast them separately). Cut the squash into a few large chunks. Drizzle with the coconut oil and season with the salt and pepper. Roast the squash for 45-55 minutes or until it’s tender and browned. You may want to flip the pieces halfway through cooking.
  3. Let the squash cool, and scoop the flesh away from the skin.
  4. Put the squash flesh into a high-powered blender along with the chicken broth, coconut milk, and curry powder. Blend for at least 15 seconds or until completely smooth.
  5. Pour into a medium pot to reheat, and adjust the seasoning with salt.

Notes
*If you have mild curry powder, it you may need 2 teaspoons or so. When in doubt, add 1 teaspoon, taste, then go from there.
Substitute butternut squash instead of kabocha.
This soup freezes well.

Curried Kabocha Squash Soup—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

Curried Kabocha Squash Soup—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

Click here to pin this!

Curried Kabocha Squash Soup—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

What’s your favorite fall soup? Let us know in the comments below!