Tag Archives: whole30

Pork Chile Verde—Paleo & Whole30

Pork Chili Verde—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com Pork Chile Verde is a classic, flavorful recipe that’s Paleo and Whole30-friendly. Instead of the usual jalapeño peppers, I used some Hatch chiles. They’re in season right now at the end of August, and their mild heat really rounds out the base of flavors from the onion, garlic and tomatillos. If you can’t find fresh Hatch chiles, you can often find them canned in the ethnic foods section of the market.

Probably my favorite thing about this Pork Chile Verde recipe is that it’s affordable. Pork shoulder is inexpensive, but the meat can be tough, so simmering it for a couple hours makes it melt-in-your-mouth tender. If you have leftovers, try reheating the meat and sauce, then dropping a couple eggs into the pan and putting a lid on it until the eggs are poached through. It’s a fantastic breakfast, and so delicious. Serve with some cauliflower rice and my Simple Paleo Tortillas for a complete meal.

Pork Chile Verde—Paleo & Whole30

Rating: 51

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 2 hours, 15 minutes

Yield: 2 to 3 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 to 2-1/2 lb (907 to 1134 g) pork shoulder, pork butt or Boston butt
  • 1 tsp (5 g) sea salt
  • 1 tsp (2 g) ground cumin
  • 1 tsp (2 g) ground coriander
  • 1/2 tsp (1 g) black pepper
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) ghee
  • 1/2 large onion, diced
  • 3 Hatch green chiles* (6 oz / 171 g), seeded and diced
  • 3/4 lb (340 g) tomatillos, husk removed and diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 c (473 mL) chicken broth
  • Large handful of fresh cilantro for garnish
  • *If you can't find fresh Hatch green chiles (available in late summer), you can use canned Hatch green chiles (two 4 oz / 113 g cans)

Directions

  1. Trim the fat off the pork, and cut it into 1 inch (2.5 centimeter) chunks. Put the pork in a medium bowl, and toss it with the salt, cumin, coriander, and pepper.
  2. Heat a large, deep-sided skillet over medium-high, and melt the ghee. Add the pork and brown each side for about 2 minutes. You're just trying to develop some color, not cook it all the way through. Remove the pork to a clean bowl while you cook the veggies.
  3. Reduce the heat to medium, then add the onion, tomatillos, and chiles. Cook and stir for 5 to 7 minutes until the onions soften and turn translucent. Then, add the garlic and chicken broth, and put the pork back in the skillet. Stir to combine.
  4. Bring this mixture to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Cover and simmer for 1 hour. Remove the lid and simmer for 1 more hour, until the sauce has reduced a bit and the pork is very tender.
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Change It Up

  • Double the recipe, and freeze the leftovers.
  • I haven’t tried this recipe in the slow cooker yet, but I suspect it would come out well if cooked on low for about 5 hours. I’d still brown the meat and onion / peppers before throwing everything in the slow cookers.

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Pork Chili Verde—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question? Leave it in the comments below!

Beet Ginger Sauerkraut

Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com

Beet Ginger Sauerkraut has long been on my agenda to make, especially after I picked up a bag from Farmhouse Cultures. It was so delicious, and while buying it pre-made is convenient, it’s far more affordable to make it myself. The beets add a bit of sweetness—plus, the color is fantastic—and the ginger is so flavorful and provides a little bite.

I have a few sauerkraut / fermentation posts on this site already, and this isn’t really any different from those. If you’re a newbie to making sauerkraut, take a deep breath (it’s going to be okay!), and read through the whole post before you start the process. It’s actually very, very simple but there are a couple key points to remember:

  • This method uses lacto-fermentation with only salt and whatever Lactobacillus bacteria are kickin’ around your kitchen environment. There is no whey in this method.
  • The veggies must stay submerged under the brine (in an anaerobic environment) the *whole* time you’re fermenting them…and even after they’re done. If not, they’ll mold quickly.
  • Clean all your glassware, utensils and hands well before you start. For extra insurance against contamination, rinse everything with white vinegar.
  • You don’t have to use a fancy fermentation cap like this, but they make the process a bit easier, and there’s less chance of contamination. I used the Kraut Source prototype for this batch, and I’m super impressed at how simple it was. It was especially good at keeping the veggies submerged. They are about to finish their Kickstarter, so get in on it while you can!
  • I’ve included a troubleshooting section at the end of this post, so if you’re seeing odd things during fermentation, check there to see if it’s normal or you should toss your ferment.

Prep time: 30 min     Ferment time:  7–14 days     Makes: 1-quart (946 mL) jar

Ingredients for Beet Ginger Sauerkraut

  • 2 lb (907 g) green cabbage (you’ll use half unless making a double batch)
  • 8 oz (227 g) red beets
  • 2–3 oz (57–85 g) fresh ginger
  • 1-1/2 tbsp (22 g) coarse sea salt (I like this one)
  • If you need extra brine, use 1 tsp (5 g) salt in 1 cup (237 mL) water

Directions for Beet Ginger Sauerkraut

The basic method for making sauerkraut goes like this:

Thinly slice the vegetables, then salt them. Pulverize the veggies by crushing them with your hands to release the juices. Pack them tightly into a jar, submerging the veggies underneath the brine. Cover with something—like fabric—so dust and bugs stay out, but air can still escape. (Gas is generated as part of the fermentation process, so don’t cover it with an airtight lid unless it’s one specifically made for fermenting or you run the risk of the jar exploding due to pressure.) Let it sit in a dark cabinet for at least a week—or longer, depending on how sour you like it—then refrigerate.

For this batch:

  1. Cut the cabbage in half. You’ll only be using half for this recipe, unless you decide to double it. (In that case, you’ll need to double the amount of beets, ginger, and sea salt, and you’ll need another jar set-up.) Very thinly slice the cabbage. I used a mandolin, but I’ve done it plenty of times with a sharp knife. Toss the cabbage into a very large bowl. Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com
  2. To prepare the beets, I scrubbed but didn’t peel them. If you’d like, you can peel them, but it’s just an extra step. I thinly sliced the beets into rounds using a mandolin, then stacked them up, and sliced them into matchsticks. Alternatively, you could shred them in a food processor or with a box grater (but that is SUPER messy because beet juice stains). Place the beets into the bowl with the cabbage.
  3. For the ginger, I grated it down finely using a microplane grater. You could also mince it by hand, just be sure the pieces are very small since biting into chunks of ginger is very spicy. Place the grated ginger in the bowl with the beets and cabbage. Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com
  4. Now, add the salt. With clean hands, start to scrunch the veggies as you mix everything together. You have to get aggressive here because you’re trying to break down the cells in the veggies and (with the help of the salt) draw out the moisture. This takes at least 5 minutes of scrunching and squeezing. (Yay for kitchen fitness!) If there’s not a lot of moisture after that time, add more by making some brine (salt water) with 1 teaspoon salt in 1 cup of water. Some cabbages are just drier than others. C’est la vie! Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com
  5. Pack the veggies into a wide-mouth quart-sized Mason jar. Really push them down. (I use my fist or a spoon.) The veggies should come up to about the shoulder of the jar. If there is not at least an inch of liquid covering the veggies, add some brine to cover. Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com Now, you have a couple options: use a special lid for fermenting to cap it all off or use a simple DIY cover. For this batch, I used a new prototype lid from Kraut Source. It uses a spring mechanism to hold the veggies down under the brine. However, if you don’t have that, the other method I’ve used successfully is to place a 4-ounce jelly jar INTO the wide-mouth jar to keep the veggies submerged. It works really, really well. Click here to see pictures and video. Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com
  6. Place the jar into a bowl or on a plate in case any liquid bubbles out. If you’re using the jar in jar method, cover with a kitchen towel and place in a cupboard or pantry for at least a week. Check the level of the liquid every couple days. If the level has dropped, add more brine. After a week, remove a bit of kraut with a fork and test the flavor. If it’s not sour enough for your liking, keep fermenting. (I find that it’s good for me around 10-14 days, but everyone is different. Some like to keep it going for weeks!) When it’s done, cover with a metal Mason jar lid and refrigerate. Keeps for a few months. Remember to keep the kraut submerged in brine the whole time, even in the fridge or it’ll mold.

 Troubleshooting your Beet Ginger Sauerkraut

  • My veggies are slimy. Bad bacteria have probably started to grow in your jar. Best to toss it out to be safe.
  • My veggies have run out of liquid. If this was recent, within a day or so, top off with more brine. If it’s been several days, you may want to throw it out and start again.
  • Help! My veggies are foaming! This is normal especially after the first couple days of fermentation because gases are being released by the bacteria and can cause bubbles or foam. You can skim the foam and keep on rockin’.
  • I see white stuff at the bottom of the jar. Is this okay? Yes. These are the bacteria. It’s totally normal.
  • Um, my veggies have greenish-black mold on top. If you’re adventurous, you can skim it and keep going. This is how moldy ferment has been dealt with for ages (and I can tell you lots of stories about what they do with moldy cheese in the grocery store). If you’re totally grossed out, just start over.
  • It’s been a couple weeks and the veggies still aren’t sour or tangy. You may have them in too cold of a spot. Try putting them in a warmer location to speed up the process a bit.

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Beet Ginger Sauerkraut | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question about making sauerkraut? Leave it in the comments below!

Healing Chicken Soup—Paleo & Whole30

Healing Chicken Soup—Paleo & Whole30 |stupideasypaleo.com

It’s hardly a secret that chicken soup is “good for what ails you”—as my grandmother used to say. If you’re a science nerd like me and want to know the how and why, click here and here. If you’re just here for the yummy recipe, you can skip all that. Suffice to say, maybe this soup isn’t a panacea, but it is definitely delicious.

I kicked up the healing properties of bone broth with the trio of ginger, turmeric, and garlic. Besides tasting aromatic and well, decidedly victorious, ginger and turmeric bring their anti-inflammatory compounds to this dish, and garlic, its antiviral properties. Infusing the broth is well worth the extra twenty minutes!

You can really dress this up anyway you’d like. I added some shredded chicken, green onion, carrot and shiitake mushrooms (gotta love that umami!) along with some gluten-free noodles made from mountain yam. Consider the broth a blank palette upon which to draw with your favorite flavors.

Healing Chicken Soup—Paleo & Whole30

Rating: 51

Yield: Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 4 cups (946 mL) chicken broth
  • 2 inch (5.1 cm) piece fresh ginger, sliced into thin coins
  • 1 inch piece (2.5 cm) fresh turmeric*, sliced into thin coins
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled & smashed
  • 1/2 teaspoon (3 mL) fish sauce
  • 2 cups (280 g) cooked shredded chicken
  • 4 ounces (113 g) shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  • 3 green onions (48 g), white and light green parts, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium carrot (40 g), julienned or shredded
  • Sea salt, to taste
  • Optional: 1 cup (227 g) zucchini noodles, kelp noodles, or mountain yam shiritaki noodles
  • Optional: Paleo Sriracha for drizzling

Directions

  1. Pour the chicken broth into a medium pot, and add the ginger, turmeric, garlic and fish sauce. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for 20 to 30 minutes to really infuse the broth with flavor. Note: If using turmeric powder (ground turmeric), start with 1/4 teaspoon (0.5 gram), and increase to 1/2 teaspoon (1 gram), depending on your preference. I find turmeric powder to be insanely potent, much more so than the fresh root, so always add less and bump it up if you'd like. While the broth is simmering, prepare the rest of the ingredients.
  2. Using a slotted spoon, remove the ginger, turmeric and garlic. Discard. Or, if you like to live dangerously, leave it all in the soup and pick around it while you're eating (like I did in the photo). Just be aware: Biting into a large chunk of ginger, turmeric or garlic is usually not pleasant.
  3. Add the chicken, mushrooms, green onions, carrot and if desired, your noodles. Heat about 5 minutes on medium-low or until everything is warmed through. Taste and adjust the seasoning with sea salt.
  4. Serve with a drizzle of sriracha for some extra heat.

Notes

*If you can't find fresh turmeric root, sub in 1/4 teaspoon (0.5 g) turmeric powder. When working with any form of turmeric, take care because it stains hands, clothing and porous surfaces.

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Change It Up!

  • Use beef or fish broth instead of chicken.
  • Use any protein you prefer or have on hand.
  • Add in your favorite thinly cut veggies.
  • Instead of fish sauce, substitute 1 teaspoon coconut aminos.

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Healing Chicken Soup—Paleo & Whole30 |stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question? Leave it in the comments below!

Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer with Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee

Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer with Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee | stupideasypaleo.com

It’s time to break up with the chemical-filled coffee creamers! One of the more common questions I get from folks is what to substitute for their favorite coffee creamer once they go Paleo. Luckily, with a few easy swaps, you can create your own deliciously flavorful dairy-free creamer. Customize it by adding a bit of natural sweetener if you prefer or leave it out for a sugar-free creamer. The choice is up to you! For a joint- and gut-soothing boost, add high-quality collagen.

To go with this Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer, I’m showing you how easy it is to make your own cold-brew coffee. Cold-brew is gaining in popularity because it’s less acidic and tends to have a smoother taste than other brew methods. This ratio of beans to water is perfect for my palate, but you can always cut back to 3 cups of water if you like it stronger. Of course, you can use the creamer in any coffee or tea you’d like.

Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer with Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee | stupideasypaleo.com

For the Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer

Makes ~2 cups (473 grams)

Ingredients

Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer with Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee | stupideasypaleo.com

Directions

  1. Place the hazelnuts in a glass jar or bowl—I like to use a quart-sized Mason jar—and add 2 cups (473 grams) cold water. Cover loosely, and let the jar sit at room temperature for 12 to 24 hours. When you’re ready to make the creamer, pour off the soaking water.
  2. In a high-speed blender, combine the soaked and drained hazelnuts and 2 cups (473 grams) fresh water. Blend on high for 30 to 60 seconds, or until the nuts are broken down. Strain the mixture through a nut milk bag or several layers of cheesecloth, squeezing out as much moisture as possible. Discard the pulp or save it to make hazelnut flour. Pour the hazelnut milk back into the blender.
  3. On a cutting board, use a sharp knife to split the vanilla bean down the middle and gently scrape out the black seeds. Add the vanilla seeds to the blender. If desired, add the honey and / or collagen. Blend on medium-high for 15 to 30 seconds until everything is combined.
  4. Pour into a storage jar and cover tightly. Keeps for 3 to 4 days in the refrigerator.

*Omit the sweetener for Whole30.

Note: You can replicate this creamer with whatever kind of nuts you prefer.

Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer with Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee | stupideasypaleo.com

For the Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee

Makes 4 cups.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup (50 g) ground coffee beans (look for a fair trade variety)
  • 4 cups (946 mL) water

Directions

  1. Pour the coarse-ground coffee beans into a 1-liter French press. Add the water, and stir with a wooden spoon.
  2. Refrigerate the French press for 12 to 24 hours. Add the plunger and carefully press it down until the ground are filtered out. If your beans were finely ground, you may want to filter the coffee through a coffee filter before drinking to remove any excess residue.
  3. Pour over ice cubes to serve cold with Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer!
  4. Stores for up to a few days in the fridge when covered tightly (for best freshness).

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Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer with Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo Vanilla Hazelnut Creamer with Homemade Cold-Brew Coffee | stupideasypaleo.com

Questions? Leave them in the comments below!

Slow Cooker Thai Beef Stew—Plus a Chance to Win Meals Made Simple

Paleo Slow Cooker Thai Beef Stew | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: Today’s recipe is a sneak peek from Danielle Walker’s new book, “Meals Made Simple” which releases on September 2, 2014. I’ve been lucky to preview the cookbook, and it’s amazing…great for newbie cooks or anyone who just enjoys simple, delicious food. Danielle notes: “Jicama may seem like a strange ingredient to add to this dish, but it provides a slight crunch similar to that of water chestnuts or bamboo shoots and adds a mildly sweet flavor.” Serve with cauliflower rice (pictured).

Slow Cooker Thai Beef Stew

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 5 hours

Yield: Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients

  • 2 Tablespoons coconut oil, divided
  • 3 pounds beef stew meat, trimmed of fat
  • 1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons peeled and minced fresh ginger
  • 1 (13½-ounce) can full-fat coconut milk
  • 1/3 cup tomato paste
  • 1/2 cup Thai red curry paste
  • 2 Tablespoons fish sauce
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lime juice
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 2 cups broccoli florets
  • 2 cups julienned carrots
  • 1 cup peeled and julienned jicama*
  • Fresh cilantro, for garnish

Directions

  1. Heat 1 tablespoon of the coconut oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Working in batches, brown the meat on all sides.
  2. Use a slotted spoon to transfer each batch of browned meat directly to the slow cooker, then continue browning. Wipe out the skillet between batches if a lot of liquid has accumulated at the bottom to ensure even browning.
  3. Wipe out the skillet and add the remaining 1 tablespoon of coconut oil. Sauté the onion, garlic, and ginger over medium-high heat for 5 minutes.
  4. Pour in the coconut milk and stir continuously to release the browned bits on the bottom of the pan.
  5. Add the tomato paste, curry paste, fish sauce, lime juice, and salt, then pour the mixture over the beef in the slow cooker.
  6. Cook on high for 5 hours or low for 8 hours. Add the broccoli, carrots, and jicama during the last 30 minutes if cooking on high, or the last hour if cooking on low. Serve garnished with cilantro.

Notes

*Omit for SCD

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Stretch It

The leftover meat tastes fabulous in scrambled eggs!

Make-Ahead Tip

Prepare Steps 1 through 5, then place the contents in an airtight container or bag. Freeze for up to 3 months, then thaw overnight in the refrigerator

The giveaway is now closed. Congratulations to the winner, Julia B. at a*****9@gmail.com!

To enter for a chance to win a free copy of “Meals Made Simple!

Use the Rafflecopter widget below to finalize your entry and unlock other bonus entries! (This is how the winner will be drawn, so don’t skip this step!)

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The contest ends August 10, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. PT, and the winner will be announced here on the blog by August 12, 2014. Be sure to check back to see if you won!

The winner will be emailed and will have 48 hours to confirm back with his or her full name, address, and phone number to claim the prize. Open to US residents only.

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Paleo Slow Cooker Thai Beef Stew | stupideasypaleo.com

Chicken Wings Scarpariello

Chicken Wings Scarpariello—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: Today’s recipe is brought to you by my guest blogger Bob from Not So Fast Food. Bob runs San Diego’s first Paleo food truck and is mega-creative in the kitchen. You may remember him from this interview I posted last year. Enjoy this flavor-packed wing recipe!

Ingredients for Chicken Wings Scarpariello

Serves: 1 or 2
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes

For the Wings

  • 12 chicken wings
  • 2 Tablespoons avocado oil
  • 1/2 bunch fresh rosemary (about 3 sprigs)
  • 1/2 bunch fresh sage (about 3 large leaves)
  • 1/2 bunch fresh oregano (about 3 sprigs)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 lemon, squeezed
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste

For the Sauce

*use 2 extra tablespoons chicken stock if you’re avoiding wine or for Whole30

Directions for Chicken Wings Scarpariello

Equipment: cast iron skillet, cutting board, chef’s knife, tongs, baking sheet

  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the avocado oil, lemon juice, garlic, and the leaves of rosemary, sage, and oregano. Taste and adjust the seasoning with the salt and pepper before adding the wings. Mix thoroughly and add the chicken wings. Cover and refrigerate the wings 24 hours to marinate them.
  2. Preheat oven to 425ºF (218ºC), and line a baking sheet with foil.
  3. Remove the wings from the marinade and discard it. Roast the wings in the oven for 15 minutes. Use tongs to turn over the wings and bake for another 15-20 minutes depending on level of crispiness you want.
  4. Meanwhile, in a cast iron skillet over medium heat, sauté the shallots in ghee until soft.
  5. Add  the white wine, chicken stock, and lemon juice and bring it to a boil, stirring the sauce as it reduces. Add the wings to the skillet and toss for 1-2 minutes until they’re well coated.
  6. Serve immediately!

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Chicken Wings Scarpariello—Paleo & Whole30 | stupideasypaleo.com

Have a question? Leave it in the comments below!

The Whole30 Gets an Update

The Whole30 Gets an Update | stupideasypaleo.com

If you’ve been a reader of the blog for a while, you’ll know I’m a huge proponent of, participant in and Envoy Extraordinaire for the Whole30 Program. (It helped me kick my sugar addiction.)

There have been a couple changes to the Whole30 recently, and an official site-wide Whole30 kicks off on August 1 through their site and social media, so you’ll have tons of support if you decide to start in a couple days. Don’t worry: You can do a Whole30 at any time, so if you can’t join in right away or you are a few days behind, it’s okay.

What is Whole30?

It’s a thirty day nutritional reset where you eliminate potentially problematic foods. Then, at the end, you can reintroduce the foods you want in a systematic way, note any negative or positive effects, and decide if / how you want to modify your dietary intake for the long-term. In other words, it’s about learning how food affects you. No lifelong promise to eat perfectly. No unsafe restriction of food. Nothing you have to pay a membership for.

Just you, learning about you + food for a month. That’s it.

What are the Whole30 Changes?

Recently, Whole30 made a couple modifications to its basic template. The biggest—and the one that caused more drama than Ronda Rousey at a Miesha Tate party—is that you can now eat white potatoes if you’re doing a Whole30. (This includes white potatoes with flesh of any color.) Click here to read WHY this change was made.

Remember, you never *HAVE TO* eat a food on Whole30 if you don’t want to, so if you think you’re better off without white potatoes, guess what? You don’t have to eat them. I’d recommend this for anyone who is sensitive to nightshades or is struggling with blood sugar regulation or losing significant body fat. And—whammy!—chips and French fries are excluded (To find out my position on white potatoes, click here.)

A minor change regarding table salt can be read here.

How Do I Get Started?

  1. Get your paws on a copy of It Starts With Food, the Whole30 book, and read it. Doing a Whole30 without reading it is sort of like speaking the words for another language without knowing what you’re actually saying. It works, but it’s less effective. How do I know that? I did my first Whole30 before ISWF was published. At the very least, peruse Whole30′s website and read all you can. Start with “Start Here!”
  2. Set a date. No, there will never be a month that doesn’t have a holiday or a friend’s wedding or a birthday celebration. You’ll have to deal with those when they come up. Commit. Put it on the calendar and get prepared.
  3. Remove “no” foods from your kitchen when possible, and stock up with “yes” foods. Here’s a good resource for that.
  4. Plan some meals. The possibilities are endless here. The official Whole30 Recipes feed on Instagram is AWESOME for getting inspiration. Plus, you won’t have to second guess if the ingredients really are Whole30-friendly or not. ISWF even has recipes in it, as does my site and many others (listed below).
  5. Jump in. Take one day at a time. Be mindful. Learn about yourself. Apply those lessons to your life. Go out and live. Be well.

Where Can I Find Resources?

Questions? Write them in the comments below.

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The Whole30 Gets an Update | stupideasypaleo.com

Bone Broth 101: How to Make the Best Broth

Bone Broth 101 | stupideasypaleo.com

Bone Broth 101: How to Make the Best Broth

Steph’s note: Today’s awesome tutorial is brought to you by Ryan Harvey, founder of Bare Bones Broth Co. Bare Bones offers hand-crafted broth shipped right to you, but if you’re more of a DIY type of person, Ryan shares some of the secrets for making the best bone broth right here for you.

All About Bone Broth

So what’s the big deal with bone broth these days? It has less to do with bone broth and more to do with the rising awareness of the role our gut health plays in the overall health of our mind, body and soul.

We’re finally starting to acknowledge that what we use to fuel our bodies directly affects the way we think, the things we do and how well we do them. Often referred to as our “second brain,” the human gut is home to over 10 trillion bacteria, a number no human can fully comprehend, yet we’re always looking for and believing in that one all-inclusive lab-manufactured antidote promised to make us feel better.

News flash: There isn’t just one food, one medicine or one supplement. There is, however, bone broth, which can be added to any diet as any or all three of these things. What other real food source contains as many bio-available vitamins and easily assimilated nutrients and extracts of pure collagen (A.K.A gelatin), skin, bone and fat ⎼ you know, the stuff that pretty much makes us human, gives us our silky smooth skin and allows us to grunt beautifully while hitting our max power snatch with ease.

Funny thing about bone broth: It’s nothing new. In fact, broths and stocks have been used for centuries by cultures around the world as a remedy to anything and everything. It also happens to be the base for all cooking, as it’s the first thing you would learn how to make in kitchens around the world as a chef’s apprentice or culinary student.

It’s what stops a stomachache dead in its tracks by soothing and healing the gut, and it quickly returns our joints to normal after an intense workout or rigorous hike. We have the natural occurring gelatin and glucosamine to thank for this; something all commercially available broths lack.

With that said, I want to share a handful of factors that will influence the outcome of your homemade bone broth. Got gelatin?

Factor #1 That Makes Great Bone Broth: Animal’s Upbringing

When deciding how to fuel my body, I always ask where my fuel came from and how it came to be.

Chances are, if you are here reading this then you and I have something in common. It’s no secret that what the animal eats, we eat. This doesn’t just apply to meat. Bones contain marrow, and marrow in turn pretty much contains the essence of our being.

If we’re healthy, that’s great but if we’re sick, our marrow is sick. The same goes for animals. The whole idea is that we’re extracting all this healthy good stuff from the animal and using it as both a food and a medicine for our bodies.

Believe it or not, this all matters on a molecular level, where everything that makes you you is working hard to maintain your optimal health as efficiently as possible. If the animal was factory farmed, ate garbage and didn’t see a pasture a day in its life, you won’t be doing your body any favors in the long run by using its bones.

Pardon my soapbox, but supporting the ranchers and farmers that raise pastured animals and grow organic produce is the only way we’ll ever see a change in our current food system. You want better access to healthy and sustainably raised meats and fresh produce? Then find and support a farm. I’ve seen numerous farms and ranches here in Southern California grow rapidly under the support of enthusiastic communities looking towards a better future in food.

Factor #2 That Makes Great Bone Broth: Animal’s Age 

That’s right. Animals are no different from us in that their bones and joints wear down and degrade over time, reducing the amount of connective tissue and consequently reducing the amount of gelatin that will end up in your broth.

The younger the animal, the more gelatinous your broth will be. Veal bones, joints, feet and necks would yield the most gelatin, as these animals are butchered very young.

You can usually find veal bones at a local butcher for a decent price. Stocks made from veal are a chef’s secret weapon in the kitchen, taking everything from soups and sauces to risottos and braised meats to the next level.

Factor #3 That Makes Great Bone Broth: Bone Type

This is where most people run into trouble.

In my experience the most commercially available bones are usually beef or veal femurs. Femurs are great as they contain a ton of marrow but very little collagen. You want a good mix of bones, joints and feet. I suggest using a 1:1:1 ratio of bones, joints and feet. This will almost guarantee you achieve that victorious gel.

Just remember to always use joints and feet, this is where you will find the most collagen. If you can’t find all of these, go ahead and make your broth with whatever you can get your hands on, you’ll still benefit greatly from the added vitamins and nutrients.

Factor #4 That Makes Great Bone Broth: Bone to Water Ratio 

Whether it’s in a crockpot or on your stove, add water just to cover the bones, and no more.

This is where a lot of folks think they’ve messed up. You’ve spent all those hours simmering away, finally cooling and refrigerating your liquid gold only to wake up in the morning to find no jiggle. You haven’t been defeated! Simply bring your broth back up to a gentle simmer and let evaporation take over. Reduce your broth by an inch or so, cool and refrigerate. If it’s still not jiggling, repeat the process.

A combination of things could have happened here – too much water, bones from sick animals, or you simply didn’t let it simmer long enough. In most cases, the gelatin simply isn’t concentrated enough to give your broth a Jello-like consistency. This is OKAY. Your broth is still loaded with plenty of good stuff.

Try not to get so caught up on the aesthetics. I see people everyday crying out for help because their broth didn’t gel, as if the broth gods are smiting their attempt at glory.

Factor #5 That Makes Great Bone Broth: Time

The beautiful thing about making broth is that once started, it requires very little attention.

The biggest issue here is not letting your broth simmer long enough. We simmer our beef broth for 48 hours and 24 hours for our chicken. Simmering for multiple days is a great way to really get everything out of the bones.

Something we do, and that I highly suggest, is to wait until you have 6-8 hours left to add your vegetables or leafy greens, such as parsley or leaves on your celery. This will prevent any bitter or burnt tastes from being imparted into your broth. The vegetables can only be cooked for so long before they begin to break down, giving your broth and undesirable and often burnt flavor.

It only takes 8 or so hours at a simmer to extract the nutrients and flavor from them, anyway. Anything much longer than this and the vegetables become sponges, soaking up all your hard-earned nutrients.

In my opinion, those are the most important things to keep in mind when making bone broth. As with most things, the more you make it the better you will get. And the better you will get at noticing all these little idiosyncrasies during the process, like waiting to add your veggies until later in the process. It took me several burnt, bitter and off-flavored batches before I finally started figuring out at what times to add what ingredients.

A Simple Bone Broth Recipe

Run through this simple checklist when making any bone broth your gut desires:

  • Roast any bones beforehand for added depth and flavor, except fish.
  • Put bones in pot and add water just to cover bones.
  • Add your acid to help draw out the good stuff. We use apple cider vinegar.
  • Bring to a boil and then reduce to a simmer.
  • Skim, skim and skim some more. Scum and impurities rise to the top during the initial simmer phase. Simply skim, discard and keep simmering.
  • Once there is no longer any scum rising to the surface, keep simmering, adding water only to cover the bones as necessary.
  • Prep your veggies. Peel onions, as the peel can impart a burnt or bitter flavor.
  • After about 15-18 hours for chicken and 35-40 hours for beef, add your veggies, herbs and spices. Wait until the final hour to add parsley or celery leaves.
  • Return to a simmer for the final leg, and this time don’t worry about adding more water. You want the nutrients and gelatin to concentrate as we bring in the flavors from the veggies and herbs.
  • Add your parsley and / or celery greens if desired. Let simmer for another hour or two.
  • That’s it. You’ve done it! Strain your broth and cool it down or use immediately for making your favorite soup, stew, sauce or meat dish!

If you’re ever short on time or can’t seem to procure bones from healthy animals come check us out at Bare Bones Broth Co.! We’ll ship our broths directly to your door, nationwide!

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Bone Broth 101 | stupideasypaleo.com

Questions about making bone broth? Leave them in the comments below!

Kohlrabi Salad with Apple Ginger Vinaigrette

Kohlrabi Salad with Apple Ginger Vinaigrette | stupideasypaleo.com

Kohlrabi is definitely not a vegetable I’d ever had gumption to try. Its funky, globular shape and oddly placed leaves always looked so strange to me. Let’s just say, kohlrabi was never on the menu…until now. I picked up a bunch at the store a few days ago and decided it was high time I give kohlrabi a try.

Interestingly, the word kohlrabi is a mashup of German phraseology that translates roughly into “cabbage turnip.” The flavor tastes of mild cabbage or something like broccoli stem but without the sulfurous undertones. In terms of nutrition, it’s rich in Vitamin C and the healthy phytochemicals that other members of the Brassica family are renowned for.

Photo Jun 14, 11 29 23 AM

I prepared this kohlrabi like a salad, but if you’ve got more time, you could certainly slice it thinner / smaller like a slaw. The simple apple ginger vinaigrette is a great complement to the kohlrabi’s crunch.

Ingredients for the Kohlrabi Salad with Apple Ginger Vinaigrette

For the Salad

  • 1 lb (454 g) kohlrabi, tops removed, halved and sliced
  • 1/4 lb (113 g) carrots, halved and sliced
  • 1/4 lb (113 g) red apple (I like Pink Lady, about half an apple), sliced
  • 1/4 cup packed (3 oz / 85 g) fresh parsley
  • 2 large (1 oz / 28 g) green onions, white and light green parts, sliced
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste

For the Dressing

  • 1/4 lb (113 g) red apple (I like Pink Lady, about half an apple), chopped
  • 1/2 inch (1.3 cm) piece of ginger, peeled and finely chopped
  • 3 Tablespoons (45 mL) apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 tsp (2 g) sea salt
  • 1/8 tsp (0.5 g) black pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons (30 mL) light-tasting olive oil or avocado oil

Directions for the Kohlrabi Salad with Apple Ginger Vinaigrette

  1. Prepare the salad by mixing the salad ingredients together in a large bowl. Set aside.
  2. Make the dressing by combining the apple, ginger, apple cider vinegar, salt and pepper in a high-powered blender or food processor. Run the blender until the mixture is broken down and starts to liquify, then with the motor running, drizzle in the olive oil.
  3. Pour the dressing over the salad and mix thoroughly to combine.

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kohlrabi2

June Giveaway: Elete Electrolyte Prize Packs

June Giveaway: Elete Electrolyte Prize Packs | stupideasypaleo.com

With summer about to officially start on June 21, I’m super excited to share this month’s giveaway with you!

Maintaining a proper electrolyte level when you’re exerting yourself through training or even strenuous work is really important. They help keep your muscles and nervous system functioning properly and guard against dehydration. Unfortunately, many electrolyte replacements available on the market are rammed with sugar and artificial ingredients. And that’s where Elete comes in! It’s a tasteless, colorless, sugarless liquid that contains vital electrolytes: sodium, magnesium, potassium and chloride.

Elete is something I’ve personally used since 2009 when I was racing mountain bikes, and I’ve definitely felt the effects of not using it—especially when I suffered severe double quad cramps during a 6 hour endurance mountain bike race in 2011. Coconut water has become a popular option for naturally occurring electrolytes, but know that it’s very low in sodium so isn’t actually a complete replacement. Bonus: Elete products are Whole30-approved.

Here’s what’s up for grabs!

THREE winners will each receive a prize pack worth over $40 with:

To enter for a chance to win an Elete prize pack!

The giveaway is now closed and winners are displayed on the widget below.

#1 Use the Rafflecopter widget below to finalize your entry and unlock other bonus entries! (This is how the winner will be drawn, so don’t skip this step!)

#2 In the comments below, tell me what sport or training you do and / or when you’d use Elete!

Enter here:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The contest ends June 30, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. PST, and the winner will be announced here on the blog by July 2, 2014. Be sure to check back to see if you won!

The winner will be emailed and will have 48 hours to confirm back with his or her full name, address, and phone number to claim the prize. Open to readers worldwide. If a non-US resident wins, an Amazon gift card for $40 will be provided.

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June Giveaway: Elete Electrolyte Prize Packs | stupideasypaleo.com

Comment below with the sport / training you do or when you’d use Elete!

6 Common Slow Cooker Problems—And How To Fix Them

6 Common Slow Cooker Problems—And How To Fix Them | stupideasypaleo.com

Slow cooker problems can turn one of Paleo’s most useful kitchen tools into a headache. These appliances are utterly indispensable for busy people who want to cook healthy food, so dialing it in can really help your time in the kitchen. From stews to bone broth to roasts and even veggies, with a little know-how, you’ll be well on your way to making satisfying meals.

Here are 6 common slow cookers problems and what to do if and when you encounter them!

Slow Cooker Problems #1: Meat comes out dry / tough.

When you’re cooking meat in the slow cooker, the leaner the cut, the drier it tends to get. That means fattier cuts of meat—think pork shoulder roasts and beef pot roasts—do better than leaner ones, like pork sirloin or chops. If the meat comes with skin or a fat cap, leave that intact to keep the meat from drying out.

It’s also possible that the meat simply cooked too long. Generally, start out with about 1 to 1.25 hours per pound for cooking on high and 1.25 to 1.5 hours per pound for cooking on low.

Slow Cooker Problems #2: The food’s too liquidy.

For slow cookers, you need about half the amount of liquid that a traditional recipe (for the oven or stovetop) calls for. If the recipe isn’t optimized for a slow cooker, cut the amount of liquid by about 50%. In fact, when I cook a whole chicken or pork roast in the slow cooker, I put the meat in without any liquid at all.

If your final dish comes out too watery, remove the lid and turn the slow cooker to high for about an hour. This will allow some of the moisture to evaporate, thickening the sauce / broth.

Slow Cooker Problems #3: There’s no automatic shut off / timer.

This one’s a valid concern with a simple solution. If you can’t be around to switch off the slow cooker and yours has no automatic shut off, purchase a lamp timer! Then, plug your machine into that, set it, and it’ll turn off even if you aren’t home.

Slow Cooker Problems #4: It makes too much food.

Many slow cooker recipes make large portions, especially for small households. Luckily, many meats / roasts, soups and stews freeze well so you can store them for days you’re too busy to cook.

Slow Cooker Problems #5: The food isn’t cooking evenly.

This is a common problem with slow cookers. If you’re making a beef stew with carrots, for example, some carrots may be mushy while some are too hard. Food that’s cut into pieces that are the same size will cook more evenly than food that’s chopped haphazardly. Very soft / fast cooking vegetables can usually be added toward the end of the total cooking time so they don’t break down into mush.

Slow Cooker Problems #6: You aren’t sure whether to use the low or high setting.

Believe it or not, the low versus high settings aren’t different final temperatures. Rather, the high setting gets the slow cooker to boiling point faster than the low setting. Then, the contents will remain at a simmer for the rest of the cooking process. I personally prefer the low setting because I think meat comes out a bit more tender with the longer cooking time.

Want my free Quick Slow Cooker Recipe Guide? Click here! Also, check out my favorite slow cooker cookbook, The Paleo Slow Cooker. Happy eating!

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6 Common Slow Cooker Problems—And How To Fix Them | stupideasypaleo.com

Questions? Leave them in the comments below.

Paleo Avocado Bacon Sliders

Paleo Avocado Bacon Sliders | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: Please welcome my guest blogger Ashley from Livin Paleo! I first learned of Ashley through her Instagram account where I saw her throwing around heavy barbells, so needless to say, she became an instant girl crush. She’s a CrossFit badass—competing in the NorCal Regionals soon—and a whiz in the Paleo kitchen, coming up with all sorts of simple but really tasty eats to fuel her endeavors. Definitely check out her blog for lots of awesome gluten free bites. Take it away, Ashley!

Serves: 6      Prep Time: 15 min      Cook Time: 30 min

Ingredients for Paleo Avocado Bacon Sliders

  • 1 large sweet potato
  • 1 pound (454 grams) ground beef
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon (2.5 grams) salt 
  • 1/4 teaspoon (0.5 grams) black pepper
  • 1/4 pound (115 grams) bacon
  • 1 red bell pepper, sliced
  • 1/2 onion, chopped
  • 1 avocado
  • 1/2 tablespoon (22 mL) lime juice
  • Olive oil or fat of choice for cooking
  • 1/2 head romaine lettuce

Directions for Paleo Avocado Bacon Sliders

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F (204°C).
  2. Wash the sweet potato and cut into 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) slices.
  3. Line two baking sheets with foil or parchment paper, lightly coat one with olive oil or fat of choice and lay out the sweet potato slices. You will need 12 slices. Lay out the bacon on the other sheet.
  4. Bake both for 20−25 minutes. Flip the bacon and sweet potatoes halfway through. While the sweet potatoes and bacon cook prepare the burgers, bell pepper and onions, and smash the avocado.
  5. In a medium bowl combine the ground beef, minced garlic, salt and pepper and form into six patties.
  6. Heat olive oil or fat of choice in a large skillet over medium heat and add the patties. Cook for about 5 minutes on each side.
  7. Heat olive oil or fat of choice in a separate small skillet over medium heat and cook the bell pepper and onions until soft and slightly charred.
  8. In a medium bowl smash together the avocado and lime juice. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  9. Assemble each slider by topping a sweet potato slice with lettuce, a burger patty, bacon, smashed avocado, bell pepper and onions and another sweet potato slice.

You can connect with Ashley via social media here: blog, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest.

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Paleo Avocado Bacon Sliders | stupideasypaleo.com

Questions for Ashley? Leave them in the comments below!

5 Recipes To Ease Your Real Food Transition

5 Foods To Ease Your Real Food Transition | stupideasypaleo.com Paleo, Primal and real food lifestyles are gaining in popularity by the day. While the benefits—such as fat loss and stable energy—are enough to convince most people to take the leap and leave their processed food-based diets behind, for others the transition can be pretty overwhelming. If you’re just starting out on your journey to Paleo, this post is dedicated to you.

These five recipes I’ve compiled from my archives can help you make the switch to a gluten- and dairy-free nutrition plan a LOT easier. And, if you don’t tell anyone what they’re about to eat is Paleo, they’ll probably never know!

5 Foods To Ease Your Real Food Transition | stupideasypaleo.com

Slow Cooker Mocha-Rubbed Pot Roast

Slow Cooker Mocha-Rubbed Pot Roast. What’s not to love already? You’re probably thinking, “Coffee? Pot roast? What?!” but rest assured that it’s not like downing a cup of joe. The coffee adds a subtle depth of flavor that the spices alone can’t achieve. The end result was fall-apart tender. If you have time, I highly recommend taking the liquid from the crock pot and reducing it down by boiling until it becomes thicker. It’s nice to drizzle on top, almost like a gravy. Of course, if you’re in a rush, you can skip that step. If you don’t have access to this awesome cold-brew coffee, and java will do. Whole30-friendly.

5 Foods To Ease Your Real Food Transition | stupideasypaleo.com

Simple Paleo Tortillas

Are Simple Paleo Tortillas really possible?! If you’re looking for a really easy Paleo version of a flour tortilla—or a French crepe—look no further. These are pretty much foolproof and are much more flexible than other Paleo tortillas I’ve tried before that mostly use coconut flour as a base. I had a huge bag of arrowroot powder to use up (a gluten-free flour alternative) so this fit the bill quite well. These Paleo tortillas hold up to folding or rolling and can be used in sweet or savory applications, and it’s easy to make a double or triple batch in advance and save them for upcoming meals. They’d also be perfect for making up some tasty lunches on the go, and I think they’d be super popular with kids (of all ages)! I tested these to see how well they’d freeze. I rolled the tortillas up, froze them, and they thawed flexible and easy to fold!

5 Foods To Ease Your Real Food Transition | stupideasypaleo.com

Paleo Chick-fil-A

This Paleo Chick-fil-A is dedicated to my friend Ricky. Being from the south, he’s been rattling on about Chick-fil-A for SO long, I finally decided to make a Paleo version for him. It came out so tasty that I’m going to bring some to party this weekend for him to officially try. The secret’s in the pickle juice! It basically brines the chicken which makes it super moist and tender. The recipe easily doubles. Whole30-friendly.

5 Foods To Ease Your Real Food Transition | stupideasypaleo.com

Watermelon Mojito Salad

This Watermelon Mojito Salad recipe was inspired by a Southern California road trip I took with one of my best friends. There may have been some mojitos consumed. I decided to make a mojito-esque—but clearly non-alcoholic—dish that would capture the flavors of this iconic Cuban drink. Plus watermelon. I love watermelon. Whole30-friendly.

5 Foods To Ease Your Real Food Transition | stupideasypaleo.com

Cinnamon French Toast Panna Cotta

Cinnamon French Toast Panna Cotta is a riff on a traditional Italian panna cotta, but mine is dairy-free. Usually panna cotta is made from a combination of milk, cream, sugar and gelatin—creamy with a slightly firm texture. Of course, there’s no actual bread in my version, but I incorporated all my favorite French toast flavors: the butteriness from the ghee, richness from the egg yolks, warmth from cinnamon and of course a bit of sweet from maple syrup. A bit of crumbled crispy bacon on top gives a savory counterpoint to the sweetness. And of course, I used coconut milk to keep it dairy-free. Seriously delicious. Keep in mind that this panna cotta doesn’t set up like super-firm gelatin desserts. I serve it in small Mason jars for a few small, rich bites.

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5 Foods To Ease Your Real Food Transition | stupideasypaleo.com

What’s your favorite Paleo recipe to serve to non-Paleo eaters?

Chicken Florentine Spaghetti Squash (Paleo)

Chicken Florentine Spaghetti Squash | Popular Paleo for StupidEasyPaleo.com

Steph’s note: Please welcome Ciarra from Popular Paleo back to the blog. Not only is she a close personal friend of mine, she’s a whiz in the kitchen AND she’s just finished writing a cookbook (releasing December 2nd so click here to pre-order) called The Frugal Paleo Cookbook: Affordable, Easy & Delicious Paleo Cooking. I know y’all are going to love it because she’s done an amazing job. (I got to test drive some of the recipes!) This Chicken Florentine dish is representative of the budget-friendly bites she’s known for. Take it away, Ciarra!

I have a not-so-secret love affair with spaghetti squash, but in my part of the country (the Pacific Northwest) it can get expensive depending on the time of year. Since I make one Paleo-friendly meal to feed my little semi-Paleo family of four each night for dinner, I’m always looking for ways to stretch a pricier ingredient. For spaghetti squash, I do that by mixing it up with chicken Italian sausage and fresh organic baby spinach for Chicken Florentine Spaghetti Squash Boats. I like to serve it all in the shell of the spaghetti squash and top it some fresh herbs and pine nuts if I have some hanging around in my pantry.

Makes: 4 servings

Ingredients for Chicken Florentine Spaghetti Squash Boats

  • 1 medium to large spaghetti squash
  • 16 ounces (454 grams) chicken Italian sausage (organic, gluten-free)
  • 1 organic white or yellow onion, diced
  • 2–3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 cups (700 grams) organic baby spinach leaves, packed into measuring cup
  • 2–3 tablespoons (30–45 mL) extra virgin olive oil
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  • Optional: 1 tablespoon (7 grams) pine nuts and chopped flat-leaf parsley

Directions for Chicken Florentine Spaghetti Squash Boats

  1. First things first, let’s get that spaghetti squash in the oven to roast while we prepare the filling. Preheat the oven to 400°F (204°C). Using a large knife and steady hand, split the squash in half lengthwise. The best way to do this is usually by scoring the squash and then inserting the tip of the blade into an end. Apply strong and even pressure on the knife, using it more like a splitting wedge on a large log rather than the familiar slicing action of a blade. Once the squash is split open, use a spoon to remove the seeds and pulp (just toss that stuff). Place the halved squash cut-side down on a roasting pan, add a few tablespoons of water to the pan and roast for 35 to 40 minutes in a preheated oven.
  2. Meanwhile, prepare the chicken Florentine portion of the dish. Heat a large skillet to medium-high and drizzle in a few tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil. Once it comes to temp, crumble in the chicken Italian sausage, garlic and diced onion. Cook and stir until the sausage is fully cooked and the onion is translucent—this should take about 12 minutes or so. A few minutes before the meat is done, pile the baby spinach on top of the sausage so that it wilts as the rest of the items in the pan finish. Stir the spinach into the sausage mixture as it cooks down. Then set it aside until the spaghetti squash has finished roasting.
  3. After you pull the squash out of the oven, turn them over so they cool a little faster. Once you can handle them comfortably (or if you can manage holding them with an oven mitt), use a fork to scrape with the grain of the squash to harvest the strands. Transfer the harvested strands into the pan with the sausage mixture, season with sea salt and black pepper to taste and the pine nuts if you want to use them. Toss the squash strands with the sausage and spinach so everything gets evenly combined.
  4. I like to serve this plated inside the spaghetti squash shell or “boat-style.” It’s pretty and, well, if I can save myself another dish to wash, then I’m all for it. Top with some toasted pine nuts and / or fresh flat-leaf parsley and dig in!

p.s.: If you happen to have any leftovers, this makes a great frittata for breakfast or a to-go lunch the next day!

Be sure to follow Ciarra and Popular Paleo on: Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter and Instagram!

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Chicken Florentine Spaghetti Squash | Popular Paleo for StupidEasyPaleo.com

Questions for Ciarra? Leave them in the comments below!

Strawberry Chili Grilled Chicken

Strawberry Chili Grilled Chicken | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: Please welcome Candace from Beyoutifully Delicious to the blog again. A couple weeks ago, I featured her PeaNOT Pineapple Slaw, and it’s gotten rave reviews. Candace is all about good food with big flavor, and this recipe will not disappoint. Without further adieu, take it away Candace!

Last Easter I came up with a fresh strawberry dressing that gave a subtle sweetness to a spring green salad. For the protein to compliment the slaw, I updated it as a marinade with some heat. There’s nothing like salty, sweet AND spicy. Now we’re talking game-changer.

I love this marinade on mahi-mahi, it’s a flakey fish that has a really clean taste to it. None of that “fishy” business that tends to draw people away from ocean proteins. If seafood is not your thing, this is perfect for chicken too.

You can easily flavor swap blackberry or apricot for the strawberry as they work well with chili peppers. I would use fresh apricots rather than dried just because I want to keep my sugar in check. It’s very easy for that to get crazy if I’m not intentional about food preparation.

Ingredients for the Strawberry Chili Dressing / Marinade

This is enough for two (6 ounce or 340 grams) filets of mahi-mahi or chicken breasts.

  • 1-1/4 cups fresh strawberries
  • 3 tablespoons coconut vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon freeze-dried strawberries, crushed into a powder (sub: 1 Tbsp apple juice)
  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoon dried Thai chilis or 2 teaspoons chili paste
  • 1 clove garlic
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated ginger
  • Pinch of salt
  • Black pepper, to taste
  • 3 tablespoons melted coconut oil

Directions for the Strawberry Chili Dressing / Marinade

  1. In a blender, add all the ingredients except coconut oil and blend on high.
  2. Turn down the speed a little and slowly drizzle in coconut oil.
  3. Marinate the meat or fish for at least 2 hours and grill it until it’s no longer pink inside, about 4 minutes per side. Discard the leftover marinade. Or, bring the leftover marinade to a boil and cook it for 5 minutes to kill any bacteria.

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Strawberry Chili Grilled Chicken | stupideasypaleo.com

Questions? Leave them in the comment box below!

PeaNOT Pineapple Slaw

PeaNOT Pineapple Slaw | stupideasypaleo.com

Steph’s note: Please give a super warm welcome to my guest blogger Candace, better known around the Web as the creative mind behind Beyoutifully Delicious. She’s incredibly sweet and wickedly innovative in the kitchen, and I know you’re going to love her Paleo recipes. In fact, look out for part two of this recipe (a Strawberry Chili Grilled Chicken) that’ll be posting next week! Without further adieu, take it away Candace!

Coleslaw was never really my thing. Anytime I had it, it was mushy, drippy and tasted like that Miracle Whip crap. Bleh!

The greatest thing about cooking is you can always make something your own and give it your personal signature. I love peanut dressing and Pad Thai but I have really given up the peanut madness since turning my food over to the “Paleo Way.” I think I was having issues with it anyhow.

I love the texture of Napa cabbage so I make this star of the show, complimented by grated beets which are perfect for sweeping out those pesky phytoestrogens, carrots and fresh pineapple. No canned fruit in syrup here! This combination makes the perfect second post-workout meal where I start tapering off my carbs, upping my fat along with another big hunk o’ protein. It’s satisfying without leaving me weighted down.

Ingredients for PeaNOT Pineapple Slaw

For the slaw

  • 1 cup shredded carrots
  • 1 cup grated beets
  • 3 cups shredded Napa Cabbage
  • 1 cup fresh chopped pineapple
  • 2 Tablespoons crushed raw cashews
  • 2 Tablespoons thinly sliced green onion
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh cilantro leaves, torn

For the dressing

Directions for the PeaNOT Pineapple Slaw

  1. Make sure you dry the veggies with paper towels or kitchen towels if they’re really damp. The pineapple will add moisture so you don’t need any extra.
  2. Add veggies and pineapple to a large bowl.
  3. Make the dressing: In a blender add the water, then add the remainder of ingredients. Blend on high until you have a smooth, creamy dressing.
  4. Use half of the dressing and toss the salad together, mixing well until everything is coated.
  5. Garnish with the cashews, green onions and cilantro.

Connect with Candace and Beyoutifully Delicious here: blog, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest

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PeaNOT Pineapple Slaw | stupideasypaleo.com

Questions for Candace? Leave them in the comments below!